The Frogs

The Frogs

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The Project Gutenberg EBook of The Frogs, by Aristophanes #6 in our series by AristophanesCopyright laws are changing all over the world. Be sure to check the copyright laws for your country beforedownloading or redistributing this or any other Project Gutenberg eBook.This header should be the first thing seen when viewing this Project Gutenberg file. Please do not remove it. Do notchange or edit the header without written permission.Please read the "legal small print," and other information about the eBook and Project Gutenberg at the bottom ofthis file. Included is important information about your specific rights and restrictions in how the file may be used. Youcan also find out about how to make a donation to Project Gutenberg, and how to get involved.**Welcome To The World of Free Plain Vanilla Electronic Texts****eBooks Readable By Both Humans and By Computers, Since 1971*******These eBooks Were Prepared By Thousands of Volunteers!*****Title: The FrogsAuthor: AristophanesRelease Date: April, 2005 [EBook #7998] [Yes, we are more than one year ahead of schedule] [This file was firstposted on June 10, 2003] [Last updated on January 5, 2007]Edition: 10Language: English*** START OF THE PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK THE FROGS ***Produced by Ted Garvin, Marvin A. Hodges, Charles Franks and the Online Distributed Proofreading Team.THE HARVARD CLASSICSEDITED BY CHARLES W ELIOT LLDNINE GREEK DRAMASBY ÆSCHYLUS, SOPHOCLES, EURIPIDES AND ...

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The Project Gutenberg EBook of The Frogs, byAristophanes #6 in our series by AristophanesCopyright laws are changing all over the world. Besure to check the copyright laws for your countrybefore downloading or redistributing this or anyother Project Gutenberg eBook.This header should be the first thing seen whenviewing this Project Gutenberg file. Please do notremove it. Do not change or edit the headerwithout written permission.Please read the "legal small print," and otherinformation about the eBook and ProjectGutenberg at the bottom of this file. Included isimportant information about your specific rights andrestrictions in how the file may be used. You canalso find out about how to make a donation toProject Gutenberg, and how to get involved.**Welcome To The World of Free Plain VanillaElectronic Texts****eBooks Readable By Both Humans and ByComputers, Since 1971*******These eBooks Were Prepared By Thousandsof Volunteers!*****Title: The Frogs
Author: AristophanesRelease Date: April, 2005 [EBook #7998] [Yes, weare more than one year ahead of schedule] [Thisfile was first posted on June 10, 2003] [Lastupdated on January 5, 2007]Edition: 10Language: English*** START OF THE PROJECT GUTENBERGEBOOK THE FROGS ***Produced by Ted Garvin, Marvin A. Hodges,Charles Franks and the Online DistributedProofreading Team.
THE HARVARD CLASSICSEDITED BY CHARLES W ELIOT LLDNINE GREEK DRAMASBY ÆSCHYLUS, SOPHOCLES, EURIPIDES ANDARISTOPHANESTRANSLATIONS BY E D A MORSHEAD EH PLUMPTRE GILBERT MURRAY AND BB ROGERSWITH INTRODUCTIONS AND NOTESVOLUME 8    *****THE FROGS OF ARISTOPHANES
INTRODUCTORY NOTEAristophanes, _the greatest of comic writers inGreek and in the opinion of many, in any language,is the only one of the Attic comedians any ofwhose works has survived in complete form Hewas born in Athens about the middle of the fifthcentury B C, and had his first comedy producedwhen he was so young that his name was withheldon account of his youth. He is credited with overforty plays, eleven of which survive, along with thenames and fragments of some twenty-six others.His satire deal with political, religious, and literarytopics, and with all its humor and fancy is evidentlythe outcome of profound conviction and a genuinepatriotism. The Attic comedy was produced at thefestivals of Dionysus, which were marked by greatlicense, and to this, rather than to the individualtaste of the poet, must be ascribed the undoubtedcoarseness of many of the jests. Aristophanesseems, indeed, to have been regarded by hiscontemporaries as a man of noble character. Hedied shortly after the production of his "Plutus," in388 B. C."The Frogs" was produced the year after the deathof Euripides, and laments the decay of Greektragedy which Aristophanes attributed to thatwriter. It is an admirable example of the brillianceof his style, and of that mingling of wit and poetrywith rollicking humor and keen satirical point which
is his chief characteristic. Here, as elsewhere, hestands for tradition against innovation of all kinds,whether in politics, religion, or art. The hostility toEuripides displayed here and in several otherplays, like his attacks on Socrates, is a result ofthis attitude of conservatism. The present play isnotable also as a piece of elaborate if not over-serious literary criticism from the pen of a greatpoet._*****    THE FROGSOF ARISTOPHANESDRAMATIS PERSONÆTHE GOD DIONYSUSXANTHIAS, his slaveAESCHYLUSEURIPIDESHERACLES
PLUTOCHARON AEACUS, house porter to PlutoA CORPSEA MAIDSERVANT OF PERSEPHONEA LANDLADY IN HADESPLATHANE, her servantA CHORUS OF FROGSA CHORUS OF INITIATED PERSONS_Attendants at a Funeral;Women worshipping Iacchus;Servants of Pluto, &c._XanthiasShall I crack any of those old jokes, master,At which the audience never fail to laugh?DIONYSUS. Aye, what you will, except I'm gettingcrushed: Fight shy of that: I'm sick of that already.
XAN. Nothing else smart?DIO. Aye, save my shoulder's aching.XAN. Come now, that comical joke?DIO. With all my heart. Only be careful not to shiftyour pole,And—XAN. What?DIO. And vow that you've a bellyache.XAN. May I not say I'm overburdened soThat if none ease me, I must ease myself?DIO. For mercy's sake, not till I'm going to vomit.XAN. What! must I bear these burdens, and notmakeOne of the jokes Ameipsias and LycisAnd Phrynichus, in every play they write,Put in the mouths of all their burden-bearers?DIO. Don't make them; no! I tell you when I seeTheir plays, and hear those jokes, I come awayMore than a twelvemonth older than I went.XAN. O thrice unlucky neck of mine, which nowIs getting crushed, yet must not crack its joke!DIO. Now is not this fine pampered insolenceWhen I myself, Dionysus, son of—Pipkin,Toil on afoot, and let this fellow ride,
Taking no trouble, and no burden bearing?XAN. What, don't I bear?DIO. How can you when you're riding?XAN. Why, I bear these.DIO. How?XAN. Most unwillingly.DIO. Does not the donkey bear the load you'rebearing?XAN. Not what I bear myself: by Zeus, not he.DIO. How can you bear, when you are borneyourself?XAN. Don't know: but anyhow my shoulder'saching.DIO. Then since you say the donkey helps you not,You lift him up and carry him in turn.XAN. O hang it all! why didn't I fight at sea?You should have smarted bitterly for this.DIO. Get down, you rascal; I've been trudging onTill now I've reached the portal, where I'm goingFirst to turn in.Boy! Boy! I say there, Boy!HERACLES. Who banged the door? How like aprancing Centaur
He drove against it! Mercy o' me, what's this?DIO. Boy.XAN. Yes.DIO. Did you observe?XAN. What?DIO. How alarmed He is.XAN. Aye truly, lest you've lost your wits.HER. O by Demeter, I can't choose but laugh.Biting my lips won't stop me. Ha! ha! ha!DIO. Pray you, come hither, I have need of you.HER. I vow I can't help laughing, I can't help it.A lion's hide upon a yellow silk, a club and buskin!What's it all about? Where were you going?DIO. I was serving lately aboard the—Cleisthenes.HER. And fought?DIO. And sank more than a dozen of the enemy'sships.HER. You two?DIO. We two.HER. And then I awoke, and lo!