The German Classics of the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries, Volume 01 - Masterpieces of German Literature Translated into English.
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The German Classics of the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries, Volume 01 - Masterpieces of German Literature Translated into English.

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The Project Gutenberg EBook of The German Classics of The Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries, Volume I., byEditor-in-Chief: Kuno FranckeThis eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it,give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online atwww.gutenberg.netTitle: The German Classics of The Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries, Volume I. Masterpieces of GermanLiterature Translated into English. In Twenty Volumes.Author: Editor-in-Chief: Kuno FranckeRelease Date: February 17, 2004 [EBook #11123]Language: English*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK GERMAN CLASSICS, VOL. I. ***Produced by Stan Goodman, Jayam Subramanian and PG Distributed Proofreaders[Illustration: On the Way Toward the Grail. By Hans Thoma]TheGerman ClassicsofThe Nineteenth andTwentieth CenturiesMasterpieces of German LiteratureTranslated into EnglishEDITOR-IN-CHIEFKuno Francke, Ph.D., LL.D., Litt.D.In Twenty Volumes IllustratedALBANY, N.Y. J.B. LYON COMPANY PUBLISHERS1913CONTENTS OF VOLUME IEditor's PrefacePublishers ForewordGeneral Introduction. By Richard M. MeyerThe Life of Goethe. By Calvin ThomasPOEMSGreeting and Departure. Translated by Charles Wharton StorkThe Heathrose. Adapted from the translation by E.A. BowringMahomet's Song. Translated by E.A. BowringPrometheus. Translated by E.A. BowringThe Wanderer's Night-Song. ...

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The Project Gutenberg EBook of The German Classics of The Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries, Volume I., by Editor-in-Chief: Kuno Francke This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.net Title: The German Classics of The Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries, Volume I. Masterpieces of German Literature Translated into English. In Twenty Volumes. Author: Editor-in-Chief: Kuno Francke Release Date: February 17, 2004 [EBook #11123] Language: English *** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK GERMAN CLASSICS, VOL. I. *** Produced by Stan Goodman, Jayam Subramanian and PG Distributed Proofreaders [Illustration: On the Way Toward the Grail. By Hans Thoma] The German Classics of The Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries Masterpieces of German Literature Translated into English EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Kuno Francke, Ph.D., LL.D., Litt.D. In Twenty Volumes Illustrated ALBANY, N.Y. J.B. LYON COMPANY PUBLISHERS 1913 CONTENTS OF VOLUME I Editor's Preface Publishers Foreword General Introduction. By Richard M. Meyer The Life of Goethe. By Calvin Thomas POEMS Greeting and Departure. Translated by Charles Wharton Stork The Heathrose. Adapted from the translation by E.A. Bowring Mahomet's Song. Translated by E.A. Bowring Prometheus. Translated by E.A. Bowring The Wanderer's Night-Song. Adapted from the translation by E.A. Bowring The Sea-Voyage. Translated by E.A. Bowring To the Moon. Translated by E.A. Bowring The Fisherman. Translated by E.A. Bowring The Wanderer's Night-Song. Translated by E.A. Bowring The Erl-King. Translated by E.A. Bowring The Godlike. Translated by E.A. Bowring Mignon. Translated by E.A. Bowring Proximity of the Beloved One. Translated by E.A. Bowring The Shepherd's Lament. Translated by W.E. Aytoun and Theodore Martin. Nature and Art Translated by A.I. du P. Coleman. Comfort in Tears. Translated by W.E. Aytoun and Theodore Martin Epilog to Schiller's "Song of the Bell." Translated by W.E. Aytoun and Theodore Martin Ergo Bibamus. Translated by E.A. Bowring The Walking Bell. Translated by E.A. Bowring Found. Translated by E.A. Bowring Hatem. Translated by A.I. du P. Coleman Reunion. Translated by A.I. du P. Coleman Procemion. Translated by E.A. Bowring The One and The All. Translated by A.I. du P. Coleman Lines on Seeing Schiller's Skull. Translated by E.A. Bowring A Legacy. Translated by A.I. du P. Coleman * * * * * Introduction to Hermann and Dorothea. By Arthur H. Palmer Harmann and Dorothea. Translated by Ellen Frothingham DRAMAS Introduction to Iphigenia in Tauris. By Arthur H. Palmer Iphigenia in Tauris. Translated by Anna Swanwick * * * * * The Faust Legend from Marlowe to Goethe. By Kuno Francke Introduction to Faust. Calvin Thomas Faust (Part I). Translated by Anna Swanwick Faust (Part II). Translated by Anna Swanwick ILLUSTRATIONS-VOLUME I On the Way Toward the Grail. By Hans Thoma Frontispiece Goethe. By J. Jäger Goethe. By J. Stieler Goethe's Houses in Weimar Goethe in the Campagua. By J.H.W. Tischbein Monument to Goethe in Berlin. By Fritz Schaper Monument to Goethe in Rome. By Eberlein The Death of Goethe. By Fritz Fleischer The Heathrose. By K. Kogler Prometheus. By Titian The Fisherman and the Mermaid. By Georg Papperitz Hermann's Parents in the Doorway of the Tavern. By Ludwig Richter Hermann hands to Dorothea the Linen for the Emigrants. By Ludwig Richter The Mother defending Hermann. By Ludwig Richter Mother and Son. By Ludwig Richter The Emigrants in the Village. By Ludwig Richter The Parson and the Apothecary watch Dorothea. By Ludwig Richter Hermann and Dorothea meet at the Fountain. By Ludwig Richter Hermann and Dorothea under the Pear tree. By Ludwig Richter The Betrothal. By Ludwig Richter Iphigenia. By Ansehn Feuerbach The Meeting of Orestes, Iphigenia, and Pylades. By Angelica, Kauffmann Iphigenia. By Max Nonnenbruch Faust and Mephistopheles. By Liezen-Mayer Margaret. By Wilhelm von Kaulbach Faust and Margaret. By Carl Becker Faust and Margaret in the Garden. By Liezen-Mayer The Death of Valentine. By Franz Simm Margaret's Downfall. By Wilhelm von Kaulbach EDITOR'S PREFACE It is surprising how little the English-speaking world knows of German literature of the nineteenth century. Goethe and Schiller found their herald in Carlyle; Fichte's idealistic philosophy helped to mold Emerson's view of life; Amadeus Hoffmann influenced Poe; Uhland and Heine reverberate in Longfellow; Sudermann and Hauptmann appear in the repertory of London and New York theatres—these brief statements include nearly all the names which to the cultivated Englishman and American of to-day stand for German literature. THE GERMAN CLASSICS OF THE NINETEENTH AND TWENTIETH CENTURIES has been planned to correct this narrow and inadequate view. Here for the first time English readers will find a panorama of the whole of German literature from Goethe to the present day; here for the first time they will find the most representative writers of each period brought together and exhibited by their most representative works; here for the first time an opportunity will be offered to form a just conception of the truly remarkable literary achievements of Germany during the last hundred years. For it is a grave mistake to assume, as has been assumed only too often, that, after the great epoch of Classicism and Romanticism in the early decades of the nineteenth century, Germany produced but little of universal significance, or that, after Goethe and Heine, there were but few Germans worthy to be mentioned side by side with the great writers of other European countries. True, there is no German Tolstoy, no German Ibsen, no German Zola— but then, is there a Russian Nietzsche, or a Norwegian Wagner, or a French Bismarck? Men like these, men of revolutionary genius, men who start new movements and mark new epochs, are necessarily rare and stand isolated in any people and at all times. The three names mentioned indicate that Germany, during the last fifty years, has contributed a goodly share even of such men. Quite apart, however, from such men of overshadowing genius and all- controlling power, can it be truly said that Germany, since Goethe's time, has been lacking in writers of high aim and notable attainment? It can be stated without reservation that, taken as a whole, the German drama of the nineteenth century has maintained a level of excellence superior to that reached by the drama of almost any other nation during the same period. Schiller's Wallenstein and Tell, Goethe's Iphigenie and Faust, Kleist's Prinz Friedrich von Homburg, Grillparzer's Medea, Hebbel's Maria Magdalene and Die Nibelungen, Otto Ludwig's Der Erbförster, Freytag's Die Journalisten, Anzengruber's Der Meineidbauer, Wilbrandt's Der Meister von Palmyra, Wildenbruch's Konig Heinrich, Sudermann's Heimat, Hauptmann's Die Weber and Der arme Heinrich, Hofmannsthal's Elektra, and, in addition to all these, the great musical dramas of Richard Wagner—this is a century's record of dramatic achievement of which any nation might be proud. I doubt whether either the French or the Russian or the Scandinavian stage of the nineteenth century, as a whole, comes up to this standard. Certainly, the English stage has nothing which could in any way be compared with it. That German lyric verse of the last hundred years should have been distinguished by beauty of structure, depth of feeling, and wealth of melody, is not to be wondered at if we remember that this was the century of the revival of folk- song, and that it produced such song-composers as Schubert and Schumann and Robert Franz and Hugo Wolf and Richard Strauss. But it seems strange that,