The Ghost Breaker - A Melodramatic Farce in Four Acts

The Ghost Breaker - A Melodramatic Farce in Four Acts

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Project Gutenberg's The Ghost Breaker, by Paul Dickey and Charles Goddard This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.net
Title: The Ghost Breaker  A Melodramatic Farce in Four Acts Author: Paul Dickey  Charles Goddard Release Date: February 27, 2008 [EBook #24702] Language: English Character set encoding: ISO-8859-1 *** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK THE GHOST BREAKER ***
Produced by K Nordquist, David Cortesi, Renald Levesque and the Online Distributed Proofreading Team at http://www.pgdp.net (This file was produced from images generously made available by The Internet Archive/American Libraries.)
THE GHOST BREAKER
By PAUL DICKEY and CHARLES GODDARD
[i]
SAMUEL FRENCH, 25 West 45th St., New York
Cast List ACT I ACT II ACT III ACT IV Stage Manager's Plot Carpenter's Plot Property Plot Electrical Plot
CONTENTS (Supplied by Transcriber)
LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS (Supplied by Transcriber)
Plate based on Act I Plate based on Act II Plate based on Act III Plate based on Act IV
p. 3 p. 5 p. 19 p. 39 p. 56 p. 70 p. 71 p. 72 p. 73
p. 16 p. 24 p. 49 p. 56
Pollyanna The glad play, by Catherine Chisholm Cushing, after the novel by Eleanor H. Porter. 5 males, 6 females. 2 interiors. Costumes, modern. Plays 2¼ hours. An orphan girl is thrust into the home of a maiden aunt. In spite of the trials that beset her, she manages to find something to be glad about, and brings light into sunless lives. Finally Pollyanna straightens out the love affairs of her elders, and finds happiness for herself in Jimmy. "Pollyanna" gives a better appreciation of people and the world. It reflects the humor and humanity that gave the story such wonderful popularity among young and old. Produced in New York, and for two seasons on tour. Royalty, $25.00. Price, 75 cents.
Martha By-the-Day An optimistic comedy in 3 acts, by Julie M. Lippmann, author of the "Martha" stories. 5 males. 5 females. 3 interiors. Costumes, modern. Plays 2½ hours. Full of quaint humor, old-fashioned, homely sentiment, the kind that people who see the play will recall and chuckle over tomorrow and the next day. Miss Lippmann has herself adapted her successful book for the stage and has selected from her novel hl tdheeli gmhotfsutl .t eRllionyga litny,c i$d2e5n.t sP, riicnfee, c6ti0o ucse nctos.medy and homely sentiment for the play, and the result is thorougy
Seventeen A comedy of youth, in 4 acts, by Booth Tarkington. 8 males, 6 females. 1 exterior. 2 interiors. Costumes, modern. Plays 2½ hours. It is the tragedy of William Sylvanus Baxter that he has ceased to be sixteen and is not yet eighteen. Seventeen is not an age, it is a disease. In his heart William knows all the tortures and delights of love. But he is still sent by his mother on errands of the most humiliating sort and depends on his father for every nickel, the use of which he must justify before he gets it. "Silly" Bill fell in love with Lola, the "Baby-Talk Lady," a vapid little flirt. To woo her in a manner worthy of himself (and of her) he steals his father's evening clothes. When his wooings become a nuisance to the neighborhood, his mother steals them back, and has them let out to fit the middle-aged form of her husband, thereby keeping William at home. But when it comes to the "Baby-Talk Lady's" good-bye dance, not to be present was unendurable. Now William again gets the dress suit, and how he wears it at the party, and Genesis discloses the fact that the proud garment is in reality his father's makes up the story of the play. "Seventeen" is a work of exquisite human sympathy and delicious humor. Royalty, $25.00. Price. 75 cents.
SAMUEL FRENCH. 25 West 45th Street, New York City New and Explicit Descriptive Catalogue Mailed Free on Request
The Ghost Breaker
[ii]
[1]
A M E L O D R A M A T I C F A R C
BY PAUL DICKEYANDCHARLES GODDARD
Copyright, 1909, by Charles W. Goddard and Paul Dickey Copyright assigned, 1914, to Sanger & Jordan
 
  
 ALL RIGHTS RESERVED CAUTION: Professionals and amateurs are hereby warned that "THE GHOST BREAKER," being fully protected under the copyright laws of the United States, the British Empire, and the other countries of the Copyright Union, is subject to a royalty, and anyone presenting the play without the consent of the owners or their authorized agents will be liable to the penalties by law provided. Applications for the amateur acting rights must be made to Samuel French, 25 West 45th Street, New York, N.Y.
 
New York: SAMUEL FRENCH Publisher 25 West 45th Street
London: SAMUEL FRENCH, LTD. 26 Southampton Street Strand
"THE GHOST BREAKER" All Rights Reserved Especial notice should be taken that the possession of this book without a valid contract for production first having been obtained from the publisher, confers no right or license to professionals or amateurs to produce the play publicly or in private for gain or charity. In its present form this play is dedicated to the reading public only, and no performance, representation, production, recitation, public reading or radio broadcasting may be given by amateurs except by special arrangement with Samuel French, 25 West 45th Street, New York. This play may be presented by amateurs upon payment of a royalty of twenty-five dollars for each performance, payable to Samuel French, 25 West 45th Street, New York, one week before the date when the play is given. Whenever the play is produced by amateurs the following notice must appear on all programs, printing and advertising for the play: "Produced by special arrangement with Samuel French of New York." Attention is called to the penalty provided by law for any infringement of the author's rights, as follows: SECTION 4966:—Any person publicly performing or representing any dramatic or musical composition for which copyright has been obtained, without the consent of the proprietor of said dramatic or musical composition, or his heirs and assigns, shall be liable for damages thereof, such damages, in all cases to be assessed at such sum, not less than one hundred dollars for the first and fifty dollars for every subsequent performance, as to the court shall appear to be just. If the unlawful performance and representation be wilful and for profit, such person or persons shall be guilty of a misdemeanor, and upon conviction shall be imprisoned for a period not exceeding one year.—U.S. Revised Statutes: Title 60, Chap. 3.
THE CAST
PSSECNIRMARIATHERESA OFARAGON. WARRENJARVIS,of Kentucky. NITA,the Princess' Maid. HOUSEDTECEITEV,Manhattan Hotel. RUSTYSNOW,Warren Jarvis' Colored Servant.
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DTESEVITCE,from Police Headquarters. HOTELPORTER. STEWARD,on S.S. Aquitania. CARLOS,Duke d'Alva. DSRELOO,the Innkeeper's Daughter. VARDOS,Messenger to the Missing Prince. DONROBLEDO,a Soldier of Fortune. PEDRO,the Innkeeper. MAXIMO,a Spanish Soldier. GASPAR,a Villager. JOSE,Chauffeur. TIME:The Present. ACTI. York. Five A.M.A Room in the Hotel Manhattan, New ACTII.A Cabin on Board S.S. Aquitania. Same Morning. ACTIII.An Old Tavern, Segura, Spain. Evening. ACTIV.The Castle. Same Night.
The Ghost Breaker
ACT I
SCENE:Room 1121, Manhattan Hotel, New York City. onli ht streams use. Tower clock At sritrsieki edssto.ar , gTgewr ood warigknu. n-Msohots gheard off sttahgreo urigghh tt.h eD owoirn dsolaw.m sS mofafl l sctlaogcek.  sFtroioktesst efipvse .h ePaard coming along acbonerdhrindhiRmE.N JARgV ISh uubbbnd aom citom.nontererries hui  nld,yol nPgR INcCoEaStS inevd gnvoe reinosag ssrecl, pokes head throgu huctriasn. nRd.bur oodpe otsrsn ght eod obtlnior  WAR  shoPurlidnecre sasg.a iMnsatdirt. ed e(! osDi )'ohWht sereS?howing only her head.) (JARVIS kicks in door, shuts it, and throws his JARVIS. Sh! Don't make any noise. PESNCRIS. (Winding her dressing gown closely about her and coming a little way into the room) What do you want? JARVIS. Silence! PSSECNIR. (Switches on lamp on right table) How dare you enter! JARVIS. Sh! Not a sound—do you understand? VOICEOFF. (R.) What's the row? SECONDVOICE. (R.) Somebody fired a pistol. PSSCEINR. What right—? JARVIS. Quiet! VOICE. Where'd he go? Look on the fire-escape. SECONDVOICE. No, he's on this floor. PSNCESRIWhat do you want here? What have you done?. What is it? JARVIS. (Turning to herI'm not going to harm you. If you will just keep quiet. Is that) Now, it's all right. clear to you? PSESIRCNAll the money I have is on that dressing table. (. Is it money you want? Pointing.) Take it and go. JARVIS. I'm not a burglar. I don't want your money. PSNCESRI. Well, then, what do you want? (Sound of running in corridor coming toward door R.) ARVI. Li n—— kT rn r. Th 'r min h r .T PRIN E Th m n' r hi h
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