The Gold Of Fairnilee

The Gold Of Fairnilee

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The Project Gutenberg EBook of The Gold Of Fairnilee, by Andrew Lang
This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with
almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or
re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included
with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.org
Title: The Gold Of Fairnilee
Author: Andrew Lang
Release Date: June 25, 2007 [EBook #21934]
Language: English
*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK THE GOLD OF FAIRNILEE ***
Produced by David Widger
THE GOLD OF FAIRNILEE By Andrew Lang
TO
JEANIE LANG,
LARRA
Dear Jeanie,
For you, far away on the other side of the world, I made this little tale of our own country. Your father and I have dug for
treasure in the Camp of Rink, with our knives, when we were boys. We did not find it: the story will tell you why.
Are there Fairies as well as Bunyips in Australia? I hope so.
Yours always,
WHUPPITY STOORIE'S SONG IN THIS TALE
IS BY THE AUTHOR'S FRIEND, F. De Q. M. Contents
THE GOLD OF FAIRNILEE
CHAPTER I.—The Old House
CHAPTER II.—How Randal's Father Came Home
CHAPTER III.—How Jean was brought to Fairnlee
CHAPTER IV.—Randal and Jean.
CHAPTER V.—The Good Folk
CHAPTER VI.—The Wishing Well
CHAPTER VII.—Where is Randal?
CHAPTER VIII.—The Ill Years
CHAPTER IX.—The White Roses
CHAPTER X.—Out of fairyland
CHAPTER XI.—The Fairy Bottle
CHAPTER XII.—At the Catrail
CHAPTER XIII.—The Gold of Fairnilee. List of Illustrations
Chapter Ten
Frontispiece
Chapter Six Page 290
Chapter ...

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The Project Gutenberg EBook of The Gold Of Fairnilee, by Andrew Lang
This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.org
Title: The Gold Of Fairnilee
Author: Andrew Lang
Release Date: June 25, 2007 [EBook #21934]
Language: English
*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK THE GOLD OF FAIRNILEE ***
Produced by David Widger
THE GOLD OF FAIRNILEE
By Andrew Lang
TO JEANIE LANG, LARRA
Dear Jeanie, For you, far away on the other side of the world, I made this little tale of our own country. Your father and I have dug for treasure in the Camp of Rink, with our knives, when we were boys. We did not find it: the story will tell you why. Are there Fairies as well as Bunyips in Australia? I hope so. Yours always,
WHUPPITY STOORIE'S SONG IN THIS TALE IS BY THE AUTHOR'S FRIEND, F. De Q. M.
THE GOLD OF FAIRNILEE
CHAPTER I.—The Old House
Contents
CHAPTER II.—HowRandal's Father Came Home
CHAPTER III.—HowJean was brought to Fairnlee
CHAPTER IV.—Randal and Jean.
CHAPTER V.—The Good Folk
CHAPTER VI.—The Wishing Well
CHAPTER VII.—Where is Randal?
CHAPTER VIII.—The Ill Years
CHAPTER IX.—The White Roses
CHAPTER X.—Out of fairyland
CHAPTER XI.—The Fairy Bottle
CHAPTER XII.—At the Catrail
CHAPTER XIII.—The Gold of Fairnilee.
Frontispiece Chapter One Chapter Two Page 240 Chapter Three Page 248 Chapter Four Tracks of Hare and Fox Page 254 Chapter Five
List of Illustrations
Chapter Ten Chapter Six Page 290 Page 265 Page 291 Page 267 Page 293 Chapter Seven Chapter Eleven Chapter Eight Page 298 Page 281 Chapter Twelve Page 282 Chapter Thirteen Chapter Nine Page 308 Page 287 Page 309 Page 311
THE GOLD OF FAIRNILEE
Page 237 Chapter One
CHAPTER I —The Old House .
YOU may still see the old Scotch house where Randal was born, so long ago. Nobody lives there now. Most of the roof has fallen in, there is no glass in the windows, and all the doors are open. They were open in the days of Randal's father —nearly four hundred years have passed since then—and everyone who came was welcome to his share of beef and broth and ale. But now the doors are not only open, they are quite gone, and there is nobody within to give you a welcome. So there is nothing but emptiness in the old house where Randal lived with Jean, three hundred and sixty years or so before you were born. It is a high old house, and wide, with the broken slates still on the roof. At the corner there are little round towers, like pepperboxes, with sharp peaks. The stems of the ivy that covers the walls are as thick as trees. There are many trees crowding all round, and there are hills round it too; and far below you hear the Tweed whispering all day. The house is called Fairnilee, which means "the Fairies' Field;" for people believed in fairies, as you shall hear, when Randal was a boy, and even when my father was a boy. Randal was all alone in the house when he was a little fellow—alone with his mother, and Nancy the old nurse, and Simon Grieve the butler, who wore a black velvet coat and a big silver chain. Then there were the maids, and the grooms, and the farm folk, who were all friends of Randal's. He was not lonely, and he did not feel unhappy, even before Jean came, as you shall be told. But the grown-up people were sad and silent at Fairnilee. Randal had no father; his mother, Lady Ker, was a widow. She was still quite young, and Randal thought her the most beautiful person in the world. Children think these things about their mothers, and Randal had seen no ladies but his mother only. She had brown hair and brown eyes and red lips, and a grave kind face, which looked serious under her great white widow's cap with the black hood over it. Randal never saw his mother cry; but when he was a very little child indeed, he had heard her crying in the night: this was after his father went away.
Chapter Two
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