The Greville Memoirs - A Journal of the Reigns of King George IV and King William IV, Vol. I
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The Greville Memoirs - A Journal of the Reigns of King George IV and King William IV, Vol. I

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Project Gutenberg's The Greville Memoirs, by Charles C. F. Greville This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.org Title: The Greville Memoirs A Journal of the Reigns of King George IV and King William IV, Volume 1 (of 3) Author: Charles C. F. Greville Editor: Henry Reeve Release Date: June 5, 2008 [EBook #25700] Language: English Character set encoding: ISO-8859-1 *** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK THE GREVILLE MEMOIRS *** Produced by Paul Murray, Eve M. Behr and the Online Distributed Proofreading Team at http://www.pgdp.net Transcriber’s Note: In this work, all spellings and punctuation were reproduced from the original work except in the very few cases where an obvious typo occurred. These typos are corrected without comment. In the original volumes in this set, each even-numbered page had a header consisting of the page number, the volume title, and the chapter number. The odd-numbered page header consisted of the year of the diary entry, a subject phrase, and the page number. In this set of e- books, the year is included as part of the date (which in the original volume were in the form reproduced here, minus the year). The subject phrase has been converted to sidenotes located below the relevant page number.

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Project Gutenberg's The Greville Memoirs, by Charles C. F. Greville
This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with
almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or
re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included
with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.org
Title: The Greville Memoirs
A Journal of the Reigns of King George IV and King William
IV, Volume 1 (of 3)
Author: Charles C. F. Greville
Editor: Henry Reeve
Release Date: June 5, 2008 [EBook #25700]
Language: English
Character set encoding: ISO-8859-1
*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK THE GREVILLE MEMOIRS ***
Produced by Paul Murray, Eve M. Behr and the Online
Distributed Proofreading Team at http://www.pgdp.net
Transcriber’s Note:
In this work, all spellings and punctuation were reproduced from the
original work except in the very few cases where an obvious typo
occurred. These typos are corrected without comment.
In the original volumes in this set, each even-numbered page had a
header consisting of the page number, the volume title, and the chapter
number. The odd-numbered page header consisted of the year of the
diary entry, a subject phrase, and the page number. In this set of e-
books, the year is included as part of the date (which in the original
volume were in the form reproduced here, minus the year). The subject
phrase has been converted to sidenotes located below the relevant
page number.
In the original book set, consisting of three volumes, the master index
was in Volume 3. In this set of e-books, the index has been duplicated
into each of the other volumes. Navigation links were created to the
entries for the current volume.
THE GREVILLE MEMOIRSA JOURNAL OF THE REIGNS
OF
KING GEORGE IV.
AND
KING WILLIAM IV.
BY THE LATE
CHARLES C. F. GREVILLE, ESQ.
CLERK OF THE COUNCIL TO THOSE SOVEREIGNS
EDITED BY
HENRY REEVE
REGISTRAR OF THE PRIVY COUNCIL
IN THREE VOLUMES
VOL. I.
SECOND EDITION
LONDON
LONGMANS, GREEN, AND CO.
1874
CONTENTS.
INDEX.PREFACE
BY THE EDITOR
[v]The Author of these Journals requested me, in January 1865, a few days
before his death, to take charge of them with a view to publication at some
future time. He left that time to my discretion, merely remarking that
Memoirs of this kind ought not, in his opinion, to be locked up until they
had lost their principal interest by the death of all those who had taken any
part in the events they describe. He placed several of the earlier volumes
at once in my hands, and he intimated to his surviving brother and
executor, Mr. Henry Greville, his desire that the remainder should be given
me for this purpose. The injunction was at once complied with after Mr.
Charles Greville’s death, and this interesting deposit has now remained
for nearly ten years in my possession. In my opinion this period of time is
long enough to remove every reasonable objection to the publication of a
contemporary record of events already separated from us by a much
longer interval, for the transactions related in these volumes commence in
1818 and end in 1837. I therefore commit to the press that portion of these
[vi]Memoirs which embraces the Reigns of King George IV. and King William
IV., ending with the Accession of her present Majesty.
In accepting the trust and deposit which Mr. Greville thought fit to
place in my hands, I felt, and still feel, that I undertook a task and a duty of
considerable responsibility; but from the time and the manner in which it
was offered me I could not decline it. I had lived for more than five-and-
twenty years in the daily intercourse of official life and private friendship
with Mr. Greville. Sir George Cornewall Lewis, to whom he had previously
intended to leave these Journals, died before him. After that event, deeply
to be regretted on so many accounts, Mr. Greville did me the honour to
select me for the performance of this duty, which was unexpected by
myself; and my strong attachment and gratitude to him for numberless acts
of kindness and marks of confidence bound me by every consideration to
obey and execute the wishes of my late friend.
In the discharge of this trust I have been guided by no other motive
than the desire to present these Memorials to the world in a manner which
their Author would not have disapproved, and in strict conformity with his
own wishes and injunctions. He himself, it should be said, had frequently
revised them with great care. He had studiously omitted and erased
passages relating to private persons or affairs, which could only serve to
gratify the love of idle gossip and scandal. The Journals contain
absolutely nothing relating to his own family, and but little relating to his
[vii]private life. In a passage (not now published) of his own writings, the
Author remarks:—
‘A journal to be good, true, and interesting, should be written
without the slightest reference to publication, but without any
fear of it: it should be the transcript of a mind that can bear
transcribing. I always contemplate the possibility that hereafter
my journal will be read, and I regard with alarm and dislike the
notion of its containing matters about myself which nobody will
care to know’ (January 2nd, 1838).
These notes were designed chiefly to preserve a record of the less
known causes and details of public events which came under the Author’s
observation, and they are interspersed with the conversations of many ofthe eminent men with whom he associated. But it must be borne in mind
that they are essentially what they profess to be—a contemporary record
of facts and opinions, not altered or made up to square with subsequent
experience. Hence some facts may be inaccurately stated, because they
are given in the shape they assumed at the time they were recorded, and
some opinions and judgments on men and things are at variance (as he
himself acknowledges and points out) with those at which the writer
afterwards arrived on the same persons and subjects. Our impressions of
what is passing around us vary so rapidly and so continually, that a
contemporary record of opinion, honestly preserved, differs very widely
from the final and mature judgment of history: yet the judgment of history
must be based upon contemporary evidence. It was remarked by an acute
observer to Mr. Greville himself, that the nuances in political society are so
[viii]delicate and numerous, the details so nice and varying, that unless caught
at the moment they escape, and it is impossible to collect them again. That
is the charm and the merit of genuine contemporary records.
The two leading qualities in the mind of Mr. Greville were the love of
truth and the love of justice. His natural curiosity, which led him to track out
and analyse the causes of events with great eagerness, was stimulated by
the desire to arrive at their real origin, and to award to everyone, with
judicial impartiality, what appeared to him to be a just share of
responsibility. Without the passions or the motives of a party politician, he
ardently sympathised with the cause of Liberal progress and Conservative
improvement, or, as he himself expresses it, with Conservative principles
on a Liberal basis. He was equally opposed to the prejudices of the old
Tory aristocracy, amongst whom he had been brought up, and to the
impetuous desire of change which achieved in his time so many vast and
various triumphs. His own position, partly from the nature of the permanent
office he held in the Privy Council, and partly from his personal intimacies
with men of very opposite opinions, was a neutral one; but he used that
neutral position with consummate judgment and address to remove
obstacles, to allay irritations, to compose differences, and to promote, as
far as lay in his power, the public welfare. Contented with his own social
position, he was alike free from ambition and from vanity. No man was
more entirely disinterested in his judgments on public affairs, for he had
[ix]long made up his mind that he had nothing to gain or to lose by them, and
in the opinions he formed, and on occasion energetically maintained, he
cared for nothing but their justice and their truth. I trust that I do not deceive
myself in the belief that the impressions of such a man, faithfully rendered
at the time, on the events happening around him, will be thought to
possess a permanent value and interest. But I am aware that opinions
governed by no party standard will appear to a certain extent to be
fluctuating and even inconsistent. I have not thought it consistent with my
duty as the Editor of these papers to suppress or modify any of the
statements or opinions of their Author on public men or public events; nor
do I hold myself in any way responsible for the tenor of them. Some of
these judgments of the writer may be thought harsh and severe, and some
of them were subsequently mitigated by himself. But those who enter
public life submit their conduct and their lives to the judgment of their
contemporaries and of posterity, and this is especially true of those who fill
the most exalted stations in society. Every act, almost every thought, which
is brought home to them leaves its mark, and those who come after them
cannot complain that this mark is as indelible as their fame. The only
omissions I have thought it right to make are a few passages and
expressions relating to persons and occurrences in private life, in which I
have sought to publish nothing which could give pain or annoyance topersons still alive.
It will be observed that these Journals begin in the year 1818, when
[x]Mr. Greville was barely twenty-four years of age, and indeed I possess
some notes of an earlier period, which it was not thought desirable to
include in this publication. At that age Mr. Greville had but a short
experience of life, without the opportunities of information which he
subsequently enjoyed; consequently the first two or three chapters of the
first volume are of secondary interest, and the political value of the work
begins with the retirement of Lord Liverpool. But it is by his own express
desire that these chapters are retained to complete the series, and the
particulars relating to the Duke of York and to the Queen’s trial are not
without interest. As the Author advanced in life his narrative increases in
value both in substance and in style, and the most important portion of it is
that which must at present be reserved for future publication.
Of the Author of these Journals it may suffice to say that Charles
Cavendish Fulke Greville was the eldest of the three sons of Charles
Greville (who was grandson of the fifth Lord Warwick), by Lady Charlotte
Cavendish Bentinck, eldest daughter of William Henry, third Duke of
Portland, K.G., who filled many great offices of State. He was born on the
2nd of April, 1794. Much of his childhood was spent at his grandfather’s
house at Bulstrode. He was educated at Eton and at Christ Church,
Oxford; but he left the University early, having been appointed private
secretary to Earl Bathurst before he was twenty.
The influence of the Duke of Portland obtained for him early in life the
sinecure appointment of the Secretaryship of Jamaica, the duties of that
[xi]office being performed by deputy, and likewise the reversion of the
Clerkship of the Council. He entered in 1821 upon the duties of Clerk of
the Council in Ordinary, which he discharged for nearly forty years. During
the last twenty years of his life Mr. Greville occupied a suite of rooms in the
house of Earl Granville in Bruton Street, and there, on the 18th of January,
1865, he expired. I was with him on the previous evening until he retired to
rest; from that sleep he never woke.
No additions whatever have been made to the text of these Journals.
The passages occasionally interposed in a parenthesis, at a later date, to
correct or comment upon a previous statement, are all by the hand of the
Author. So likewise are the notes distinguished by no mark. For the notes
included in brackets [] the Editor is responsible.
Henry Reeve.
October 1st, 1874
Contents of the First Volume
CHAPTER I.
[xiii]Queen Charlotte — Duchesses of Cumberland and Cambridge
— Westminster Election — Contest between Sir Francis
Burdett and Sir Murray Maxwell — London Election —
Oatlands — The Duke of York — Duchess of York — Ampthill
— Tixall — Mr. Luttrell — Lady Granville — Teddesley —Macao — Burleigh — Middleton — Lady Jersey — The New
Parliament — Tierney and Pitt — Princess Lieven — Madame
de Staël on the French Revolution — Westminster Election —
Hobhouse Defeated — Scarlett’s Maiden Speech — Influence
of Party — Play — The Persian Ambassador at Court — Prince
Leopold — Woburn — Anecdote of the Allies — Death of
George III. — Illness of George IV. — Queen Caroline — Fleury
de Chabaulon — The Cato Street Conspiracy — George IV. at
Ascot — Marchioness of Conyngham — Queen Caroline in
London — Message to Parliament — Debates —
Insubordination in the Guards — Wilberforce’s Motion —
Proceedings against the Queen — ‘Les Liaisons dangereuses’
— The Queen’s Trial — The Duke of Wellington on the Battle
of Waterloo and the Occupation of Paris.
CHAPTER II.
Popularity of George IV. — The Duke of York’s Racing
Establishment — Clerk of the Council — Lord Liverpool and
Mr. Sumner — Lady Conyngham — Death of Lady Worcester
— Her Character — Ball at Devonshire House — The Duke of
York’s Aversion to the Duke of Wellington — The Pavilion at
Brighton — Lord Francis Conyngham — The King and the
Duke of Wellington — Death of the Marquis of Londonderry —
His Policy — Sir B. Bloomfield sent to Stockholm — Mr.
Canning’s Foreign Secretary — Queen Caroline and
Brougham — Canning and George IV. — Lord William
Bentinck aspires to go to India — His Disappointment — The
Duke of York’s Duel with Colonel Lennox — George III.’s Will
— George IV. appropriates the late King’s Personal Property —
[xiv]The Duke of Wellington on the Congress of Verona and on the
Politics of Europe — Intervention in Spain — Ferdinand VII. —
M. de Villèle — The Duke’s Opinion of Napoleon — Sir William
Knighton — The Duke of York’s Anecdotes of George IV. —
Death of the Marquis of Titchfield — His Character
CHAPTER III.
The Panic of 1825 — Death of the Emperor Alexander — The
Duke of Wellington’s Embassy to St. Petersburg — Robinson
Chancellor of the Exchequer — Small Notes Bill — Death of
Arthur de Ros — George III. and Lord Bute — Illness and Death
of the Duke of York — His Funeral — Lord Liverpool struck with
Paralysis — Rundell’s Fortune and Will — Copley and Philpots
— The Cottage — Formation of Mr. Canning’s Administration
— Secession of the Tories — The Whigs join him — Dinner at
the Royal Lodge — Difficulties of Canning’s Government —
Duke of Wellington visits the King — Canning’s Death —
Anecdotes of Mr. Canning — Recognition of South American
States — His Industry — The Duke of Wellington on Canning
— Lord Goderich’s Administration formed — The Difficulty
about Herries — Position of the Whigs — The King’s Letter to
Herries — Peel and George IV. — Interview of Lord
Lansdowne with the King — Weakness of the Government —
First Resignation of Lord Goderich — Lord Harrowby declines
the Premiership — Lord Goderich returns — Brougham and
Rogers — Conversation and Character of Brougham — LordGoderich’s Ministry dissolved — Cause of its Dissolution —
Hostility of Herries — Position of Huskisson and his Friends —
Herries and Huskisson both join the New Cabinet
CHAPTER IV.
The Duke of Wellington’s Administration — Huskisson’s
Speech — Irritation of Mr. Canning’s Friends — Tom
Duncombe’s Maiden Speech — Mr. Huskisson resigns and the
Canningites quit the Government — Princess Lieven hostile to
the Duke — The Catholic Question — Jockey Club Dinner at
St. James’s — Lord Lyndhurst — Sir Robert Adair — Fox and
Burke — Fox and Pitt — The Lord High Admiral dismissed by
the King — Dawson’s Speech on Catholic Emancipation —
The King’s Health — His Pages — State of Ireland — Marquis
of Anglesey — O’Connell — His Influence in Ireland — Lord
Belmore Governor of Jamaica — The Duke’s Letter to Dr.
Curtis — Recall of Lord Anglesey from Ireland — Causes of
this Event — Excitement of the King on the Catholic Question
— His Aversion to Sir William Knighton — Character of George
IV. — Denman’s Silk Gown — Pension to Lady Westmeath —
Duke of Wellington on Russia — The Reis-Effendi — Duke of
Northumberland goes to Ireland — Privy Council Register —
State Paper Office — The Gunpowder Plot — Catholic
Emancipation — Navarino
CHAPTER V.
[xv]The Catholic Relief Bill — Inconsistency of the Tories — The
Catholic Association — Dinner at Charles Grant’s — The
Terceira Expedition — Tory Discontent — Peel resigns his
Seat for Oxford University — A Blunder in Chancery — The
Oxford Election — Influence of the Duke of Wellington —
Debate of Royal Dukes — Peel beaten — Sir Edward
Codrington — Violence of the King — Intrigues to defeat the
Catholic Bill — The Duke of Cumberland — Furious State of
Parties — Matuscewitz — Peel’s Speech on Catholic
Emancipation — Exclusion of O’Connell from his Seat for Clare
— Pitt’s View of Catholic Emancipation — ‘Musæ
Cateatonenses’ — ‘Thorough’ — Mr. Lowther not turned out —
Duke of Newcastle’s Audience of George IV. — The King’s
Personal Habits — The Debate — Mr. Sadler — Hardness of
the Duke of Wellington — His Duel with Lord Winchelsea —
The Bishops and the Bill — Sir Charles Wetherell — The King
on the Duel — Lord Winchelsea’s Pocket-handkerchief —
Debate on the Catholic Bill — The Duke of Richmond —
Effects of Dawson’s Speech on the King — The Bill in
Jeopardy — Lady Jersey and Lord Anglesey — Lord Falmouth
and Lord Grey — O’Connell at Dinner — The Duke breaks with
Lord Eldon — Hibner the Murderess — Theatrical Fund — The
Levee — The Duke’s Carriage stopped — The King’s Health
— Lady Conyngham — O’Connell’s Seat — Child’s Ball at
Court — Princess Victoria — Legal Appointments — Lord
Palmerston on Foreign Affairs — The King and Lord Sefton —
The King’s Speech on the Prorogation — Madame Du Cayla
— George IV.’s Inaccuracy — Conversation of the Duke of
Wellington on the King and the Duke of CumberlandCHAPTER VI.
The Recorder’s Report — Manners of George IV — Intrigues of
the Duke of Cumberland — Insults Lady Lyndhurst — Deacon
Hume at the Board of Trade — Quarrel between the Duke of
Cumberland and the Lord Chancellor — A Bad Season —
Prostration of Turkey — France under Polignac — State of
Ireland — Mr. Windham’s Diary — George IV.’s Eyesight —
Junius — A Man without Money — Court-martial on Captain
Dickenson — The Duke and the ‘Morning Journal’ — Physical
Courage of the King — A Charade at Chatsworth — Huskisson
and the Duke — Irish Trials — Tom Moore — Scott — Byron —
Fanny Kemble — Sir James Mackintosh — His Conversation
— Black Irishmen — Moore’s Irish Story — Moore’s Singing —
George IV. and Mr. Denman — Strawberry Hill — Moore at
Trinity College — Indian Vengeance at Niagara — Count
Woronzow — Lord Glengall’s Play — The Recorder’s Report
CHAPTER VII.
[xvi]Chapter of the Bath — The Duc de Dino arrested — A Ball to
the Divan — English Policy in Greece — Sir Thomas Lawrence
— Gallatin — Court of King’s Bench — Accident to the Grand
Duke Constantine — Osterley — Young Sidney Herbert —
Duke of Wellington in Office — Stapleton’s ‘Life of Canning’ —
Death of Sir Thomas Lawrence — Leopold and the Throne of
Greece — Canning’s Answers to Lord Grey — Distressed State
of the Country — Canning’s Greatness and his Failings —
Death of Tierney — Sir Martin Shee President — The Duke of
Wellington’s Views and Conduct — The coming Session —
Moore’s ‘Life of Byron’ — Character of Byron — Opening of
Parliament — The Fire King — The Duke of Wellington’s
Speaking — The English Opera House burnt down — Lord
Thurlow on Kenyon and Buller — Old Rothschild —
Lansdowne House — Earl Stanhope — John Murray —
Departure for Italy
CHAPTER VIII.
Calais — Beau Brummell — Paris — The Polignac Ministry —
Polignac and Charles X. — The Duke of Orleans — State of
Parties — Talleyrand — Lyons — First Impressions of
Mountain Scenery — Mont Cenis — Turin — Marengo —
Genoa — Road to Florence — Pisa — Florence — Lord and
Lady Burghersh — Thorwaldsen — Lord Cochrane — Rome —
St. Peter’s — Frascati — Grotto Ferrata — Queen Hortense
and Louis Napoleon — Coliseum — Death of Lady
Northampton — The Moses — Gardens — Palm Sunday —
Sistine Chapel — The Cardinals — Popes — Cardinal Albani
— The Farnese Palace — A Dead Cardinal — Pasquin —
Statue of Pompey — Galleries and Catacombs — Bunsen —
The Papal Benediction — Ceremonies of the Holy Week —
The Grand Penitentiary — A Confession — Protestant
Cemetery — Illumination of St. Peter’s — Torlonia — Bunsen
on the Forum
CHAPTER IX.Lake of Albano — Velletri — Naples — Rapid Travelling in
1830 — A Trial at Naples — Deciphering Manuscripts — Ball
at the Duchesse d’Eboli’s — Matteis’s Plot and Trial —
Pompeii — Taking the Veil — Pausilippo — Baiæ — La Cava
— Salerno — Pæstum — Lazaroni — Museum of Naples —
Grotto del Cane — The Camaldoli — Herculaneum —
Vesuvius — Sorrento — Miracle of St. Januarius — Astroni —
Farewell to Naples
CHAPTER X.
[xvii]Moladi Gaeta — Capua — Lines on leaving Naples — Return
to Rome — The Aqueducts — ‘Domine, quo vadis?’ — St.
Peter’s — The Scala Santa — Reasons in Favour of San
Gennaro — Ascent of St. Peter’s — Library of the Vatican — A
racing ex voto — Illness of George IV. — Approaching Coup
d’État in France — The Villa Mills — The Malaria — Duc and
Duchesse de Dalberg — The Emperor Nicholas on his
Accession — Cardinal Albani — A Columbarium — Maii — Sir
William Gell — Tivoli — Hadrian’s Villa — The Adventures of
Miss Kelly and Mr. Swift — Audience of the Pope — Gibson’s
Studio — End of Miss Kelly’s Marriage — A Great Function —
The Jesuits — Saint-making — San Lorenzo in Lucina — The
Flagellants — Statues by Torchlight — Bunsen on the State of
Rome — Frascati — Relations of Protestant States with Rome
— The French Ministry — M. de Villèle — The Coliseum —
Excommunication of a Thief — The Passionists — The Corpus
Domini — A Rash Marriage — Farewell to Rome — Falls of
Terni — Statue at Pratolino — Bologna — Mezzofanti —
Ferrara — Venice — Padua — Vicenza — Brescia — Verona
— Milan — Lago Maggiore — The Simplon — Geneva — Paris
NOTE.
Mr. Greville’s Connexion with the Turf.
A JOURNAL
OF THE
REIGN OF KING GEORGE THE
FOURTH
CHAPTER I.
[1]Queen Charlotte — Duchesses of Cumberland and Cambridge— Westminster Election — Contest between Sir Francis
Burdett and Sir Murray Maxwell — London Election —
Oatlands — The Duke of York — Duchess of York — Ampthill
— Tixall — Mr. Luttrell — Lady Granville — Teddesley —
Macao — Burleigh — Middleton — Lady Jersey — The New
Parliament — Tierney and Pitt — Princess Lieven — Madame
de Staël on the French Revolution — Westminster Election —
Hobhouse Defeated — Scarlett’s Maiden Speech — Influence
of Party — Play — The Persian Ambassador at Court — Prince
Leopold — Woburn — Anecdote of the Allies — Death of
George III. — Illness of George IV. — Queen Caroline — Fleury
de Chabaulon — The Cato Street Conspiracy — George IV. at
Ascot — Marchioness of Conyngham — Queen Caroline in
London — Message to Parliament — Debates —
Insubordination in the Guards — Wilberforce’s Motion —
Proceedings against the Queen — ‘Les Liaisons dangereuses’
— The Queen’s Trial — The Duke of Wellington on the Battle
of Waterloo and the Occupation of Paris.
1818.
I began to keep a Journal some time ago, and, after continuing it
irregularly, dropped it entirely. I have since felt tempted to resume it,
because, having frequent opportunities of mixing in the society of
celebrated men, some particulars about them might be interesting
hereafter.
June 7th, 1818
The dissolution of Parliament is deferred on account of the mistakes
which have been made in passing the Alien Bill. On Friday night the
[2]exultation of the Opposition was very great at what they deemed a victory
over the Ministers. It is said that there will be 100 contests, and that
LAST YEARS OFGovernment will lose twenty or thirty members. The Queen was so ill on
THE REGENCY.
Friday evening that they expected she would die. She had a severe
[1]spasm.
[1] [Queen Charlotte, consort of George III., died on the 17th
of November of this year, 1818.]
[2]The Duchess of Cambridge has been received in a most flattering
manner here, and it is said that the Duchess of Cumberland is severely
mortified at the contrast between her reception and that of her sister-in-law.
On the Sunday after her arrival the Duke took her to walk in the Park,
when she was so terrified by the pressure of the mob about her that she
nearly fainted away.
[2] [Prince Adolphus Frederick, Duke of Cambridge, seventh
son of George III., married on the 7th of May, 1818, Augusta
Wilhelmina Louisa, Princess of Hesse, youngest daughter of the
Landgrave of Hesse-Cassel. Ernest, Duke of Cumberland, the
King’s fourth son, married on the 29th of August, 1815, at Strelitz,
the Princess Frederica, third daughter of the Duke of
Mecklenburg-Strelitz. This lady had been twice married before,