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The Gutenberg Webster's Unabridged Dictionary - Section M, N, and O

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The Project Gutenberg Etext of The 1913 Webster Unabridged Dictionary
Version 0.50 Letters M, N & O: #665 in our series, by MICRA, Inc.
Copyright laws are changing all over the world, be sure to check the copyright laws for your country before posting these
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The 1913 Webster Unabridged Dictionary: Letters M, N & O
February, 1999 [Etext #665]
The Project Gutenberg Etext of The 1913 Webster Unabridged Dictionary
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<! Begin file 6 of 11: M, N and O. (Version 0.50) of
An electronic field-marked version of:
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary
Version published 1913
by the C. & G. Merriam Co.
Springfield, Mass.
Under the direction of
Noah Porter, D.D., LL.D.
This electronic version was prepared by MICRA, Inc. of Plainfield, NJ. Last edit February 11, 1999.
MICRA, Inc. makes no proprietary claims on this version of the 1913 Webster dictionary. If the original printed edition of
the 1913 Webster is in the public domain, this version may also be considered as public domain.
This version is only a first typing, and has numerous typographic errors, including errors in the field-marks. Assistance
in bringing this dictionary to a more accurate and useful state will be greatly appreciated.
This electronic dictionary is made available as a potential starting point for development of a modern on-line
comprehensive encyclopedic dictionary, by the efforts of all individuals willing to help build a large and freely available
knowledge base. Anyone willing to assist in any way in constructing such a knowledge base should contact:
Patrick Cassidy cassidy@micra.com
735 Belvidere Ave. Office: (908)668-5252
Plainfield, NJ 07062 (908) 561-3416
!>
<p><point26>M.</point26></p>
<p><hw>M</hw> (&ebreve;m). <sn><b>1.</b></sn> <def>M, the thirteenth letter of the English alphabet, is a vocal
consonant, and from the manner of its formation, is called the <i>labio-nasal</i> consonant. See <i>Guide to
Pronunciation</i>, &sect;&sect; 178-180, 242.</def></p>
<p> The letter M came into English from the Greek, through the Latin, the form of the Greek letter being further derived
from the Ph&oelig;nician, and ultimately, it is believed, from the Egyptian. Etymologically M is related to <i>n</i>, in
li<i>me</i>, li<i>n</i>den; <i>emm</i>et, a<i>n</i>t; also to <i>b</i>.</p>
<p> M is readily followed by <i>b</i> and <i>p</i>. the position of the lips in the formation of both letters being the same.
The relation of <i>b</i> and <i>m</i> is the same as that of <i>d</i> and <i>t</i> to <i>n</i>. and that of <i>g</i> and
<i>k</i> to <i>ng</i>.</p>
<p><sn><b>2.</b></sn> <def>As a numeral, M stands for one thousand, both in English and Latin.</def></p>
<p><hw>M</hw>, <pos><i>n.</i></pos> <sn><b>1.</b></sn> <i>(Print.)</i> <def>A quadrat, the face or top of which is
a perfect square; also, the size of such a square in any given size of type, used as the unit of measurement for that type:
500 m's of pica would be a piece of matter whose length and breadth in pica m's multiplied together produce that
number.</def> [Written also <i>em</i>.]</p>
<p><sn><b>2.</b></sn> <i>(law)</i> <def>A brand or stigma, having the shape of an M, formerly impressed on one
convicted of manslaughter and admitted to the benefit of clergy.</def></p>
<p><col><b>M roof</b></col> <i>(Arch.)</i>, <cd>a kind of roof formed by the junction of two common roofs with a valley
between them, so that the section resembles the letter M.</cd></p>
<p><hw>Ma</hw> (m&auml;), <pos><i>n.</i></pos> [Cf. <u>Mamma</u>.] <sn><b>1.</b></sn> <def>A child's word for
<i>mother</i>.</def></p>
<p><sn><b>2.</b></sn> [Hind.] <def>In Oriental countries, a respectful form of address given to a woman; mother.</def>
<i>Balfour (Cyc. of India).</i></p>
<p><hw>||Ma</hw>, <pos><i>conj.</i></pos> [It.] <i>(Mus.)</i> <def>But; — used in cautionary phrases; as, "Vivace,
<i>ma</i> non troppo presto" (i. e., lively, <i>but</i> not too quick).</def> <i>Moore (Encyc. of Music).</i></p>
<p><hw>Maa</hw> (?), <pos><i>n.</i></pos> [See <u>New</u> a gull.] <i>(Zo&ouml;l.)</i> <def>The common
European gull (<i>Larus canus</i>); — called also <i>mar</i>. See <u>New</u>, a gull.</def></p>
<p><hw>Maad</hw> (?), obs. <pos><i>p. p.</i></pos> of <u>Make</u>. <def>Made.</def> <i>Chaucer.</i></p>
<p><hw>Maa"lin</hw> (?), <pos><i>n.</i></pos> <i>(Zo&ouml;l.)</i> <sd><i>(a)</i></sd> <def>The sparrow
hawk.</def> <sd><i>(b)</i></sd> <def>The kestrel.</def></p>
<p><hw>Ma'am</hw> (?), <pos><i>n.</i></pos> <def>Madam; my lady; — a colloquial contraction of <i>madam</i>
often used in direct address, and sometimes as an appellation.</def></p>
<p><hw>Ma"a*ra shell`</hw> (?). <i>(Zo&ouml;l.)</i> <def>A large, pearly, spiral, marine shell (<i>Turbo
margaritaceus</i>), from the Pacific Islands. It is used as an ornament.</def></p>
<p><hw>||Ma*ash"a</hw> (?), <pos><i>n.</i></pos> <def>An East Indian coin, of about one tenth of the weight of a
rupee.</def></p>
<p><hw>Maat</hw> (?), <pos><i>a.</i></pos> [See <u>Mate</u>, <pos><i>a.</i></pos>] <def>Dejected; sorrowful;
downcast.</def> [Obs.] "So piteous and so <i>maat</i>." <i>Chaucer.</i></p>
<p><hw>Mab</hw> (m&abreve;b), <pos><i>n.</i></pos> [Cf. W. <i>mad</i> a male child, a boy.]</p>
<p><sn><b>1.</b></sn> <def>A slattern.</def> [Prov. Eng.]</p>
<p><sn><b>2.</b></sn> <def>The name of a female fairy, esp. the queen of the fairies; and hence, sometimes, any
fairy.</def> <i>Shak.</i></p>
<p><hw>Mab"ble</hw> (?), <pos><i>v. t.</i></pos> <def>To wrap up.</def> [Obs.]</p>
<p><hw>Mab"by</hw> (?), <pos><i>n.</i></pos> <def>A spirituous liquor or drink distilled from potatoes; — used in the
Barbadoes.</def></p>
<p><hw>||Ma*bo"lo</hw> (?), <pos><i>n.</i></pos> <i>(Bot.)</i> <def>A kind of persimmon tree (<i>Diospyros
discolor</i>) from the Philippine Islands, now introduced into the East and West Indies. It bears an edible fruit as large asa quince.</def></p>
<p><hw>Mac</hw> (?). [Gael., son.] <def>A prefix, in names of Scotch origin, signifying <i>son</i>.</def></p>
<p><hw>||Ma*ca"co</hw> (?), <pos><i>n.</i></pos> [Cf. Pg. <i>macaco</i>.] <i>(Zo&ouml;l.)</i> <def>Any one of
several species of lemurs, as the ruffed lemur (<i>Lemur macaco</i>), and the ring- tailed lemur (<i>L.
catta</i>).</def></p>
<p><hw>||Ma*ca"cus</hw> (?), <pos><i>n.</i></pos> [NL., a word of African origin. Cf. <u>Macaco</u>,
<u>Macaque</u>.] <i>(Zo&ouml;l.)</i> <def>A genus of monkeys, found in Asia and the East Indies. They have short
tails and prominent eyebrows.</def></p>
<p><hw>Mac*ad`am*i*za"tion</hw> (?), <pos><i>n.</i></pos> <def>The process or act of macadamizing.</def></p>
<p><hw>Mac*ad"am*ize</hw> (?), <pos><i>v. t.</i></pos> [<pos><i>imp. & p. p.</i></pos> <u>Macadamized</u> (?);
<pos><i>p. pr. & vb. n.</i></pos> <u>Macadamizing</u>.] [From John Loudon <i>McAdam</i>, who introduced the
process into Great Britain in 1816.] <def>To cover, as a road, or street, with small, broken stones, so as to form a
smooth, hard, convex surface.</def></p>
<p><hw>Mac*ad"am road`</hw> (?). [See <u>Macadamize</u>.] <def>A macadamized road.</def></p>
<p><hw>Ma*ca"o</hw> (?), <pos><i>n.</i></pos> <i>(Zo&ouml;l.)</i> <def>A macaw.</def></p>
<p><hw>||Ma`caque"</hw> (?), <pos><i>n.</i></pos> [F. See <u>Macacus</u>.] <i>(Zo&ouml;l.)</i> <def>Any one of
several species of short-tailed monkeys of the genus <i>Macacus</i>; as, <i>M. maurus</i>, the moor <i>macaque</i>
of the East Indies.</def></p>
<p><hw>Mac`a*ran"ga gum`</hw> (?). <def>A gum of a crimson color, obtained from a tree (<i>Macaranga Indica</i>)
that grows in the East Indies. It is used in taking impressions of coins, medallions, etc., and sometimes as a
medicine.</def> <i>Balfour (Cyc. of India).</i></p>
<p><hw>Mac"a*rize</hw>, <pos><i>v. t.</i></pos> [Gr. &?; to bless.] <def>To congratulate.</def> [Oxford Univ. Cant]
<i>Whately.</i></p>
<p><hw>Mac`a*ro"ni</hw> (?), <pos><i>n.</i></pos>; <i>pl.</i> <plw><b>Macaronis</b></plw> (#), or
<plw><b>Macaronies</b></plw>. [Prov. It. <i>macaroni</i>, It. <i>maccheroni</i>, fr. Gr. &?; happiness, later, a funeral
feast, fr. &?; blessed, happy. Prob. so called because eaten at such feasts in honor of the dead; cf. Gr. &?; blessed, i. e.,
dead. Cf. <u>Macaroon</u>.] <sn><b>1.</b></sn> <def>Long slender tubes made of a paste chiefly of wheat flour, and
used as an article of food; Italian or Genoese paste.</def></p>
<p>&fist; A paste similarly prepared is largely used as food in Persia, India, and China, but is not commonly made
tubular like the Italian <i>macaroni</i>. <i>Balfour (Cyc. of India).</i></p>
<p><sn><b>2.</b></sn> <def>A medley; something droll or extravagant.</def></p>
<p><sn><b>3.</b></sn> <def>A sort of droll or fool.</def> [Obs.] <i>Addison.</i></p>
<p><sn><b>4.</b></sn> <def>A finical person; a fop; — applied especially to English fops of about 1775.</def>
<i>Goldsmith.</i></p>
<p><sn><b>5.</b></sn> <i>pl.</i> <i>(U. S. Hist.)</i> <def>The designation of a body of Maryland soldiers in the
Revolutionary War, distinguished by a rich uniform.</def> <i>W. Irving.</i></p>
<p>{ <hw>Mac`a*ro"ni*an</hw> (?), <hw>Mac`a*ron"ic</hw> (?), } <pos><i>a.</i></pos> [Cf. It. <i>maccheronico</i>, F.
<i>macaronique</i>.] <sn><b>1.</b></sn> <def>Pertaining to, or like, macaroni (originally a dish of mixed food); hence,
mixed; confused; jumbled.</def></p>
<p><sn><b>2.</b></sn> <def>Of or pertaining to the burlesque composition called macaronic; as, <i>macaronic</i>
poetry.</def></p>
<p><hw>Mac`a*ron"ic</hw> (?), <pos><i>n.</i></pos> <sn><b>1.</b></sn> <def>A heap of thing confusedly mixed
together; a jumble.</def></p>
<p><sn><b>2.</b></sn> <def>A kind of burlesque composition, in which the vernacular words of one or more modern
languages are intermixed with genuine Latin words, and with hybrid formed by adding Latin terminations to other
roots.</def></p>
<p><hw>Mac`a*roon"</hw> (?), <pos><i>n.</i></pos> [F. <i>macaron</i>, It. <i>maccherone</i>. See
<u>Macaroni</u>.] <sn><b>1.</b></sn> <def>A small cake, composed chiefly of the white of eggs, almonds, and
sugar.</def></p>
<p><sn><b>2.</b></sn> <def>A finical fellow, or macaroni.</def> [Obs.]</p><p><hw>Ma*cart"ney</hw> (?), <pos><i>n.</i></pos> [From Lord <i>Macartney</i>.] <i>(Zo&ouml;l.)</i> <def>A
firebacked pheasant. See <u>Fireback</u>.</def></p>
<p><hw>Ma*cas`sar oil"</hw> (?). <def>A kind of oil formerly used in dressing the hair; — so called because originally
obtained from <i>Macassar</i>, a district of the Island of Celebes. Also, an imitation of the same, of perfumed castor oil
and olive oil.</def></p>
<p><hw>||Ma*cau"co</hw> (?), <pos><i>n.</i></pos> <i>(Zo&ouml;l.)</i> <def>Any one of several species of small
lemurs, as <i>Lemur murinus</i>, which resembles a rat in size.</def></p>
<p><hw>||Ma`ca*va"hu</hw> (?), <pos><i>n.</i></pos> <i>(Zo&ouml;l.)</i> <def>A small Brazilian monkey (<i>Callithrix
torquatus</i>), — called also <i>collared teetee</i>.</def></p>
<p><hw>Ma*caw"</hw> (?), <pos><i>n.</i></pos> [From the native name in the Antilles.] <i>(Zo&ouml;l.)</i> <def>Any
parrot of the genus <i>Sittace</i>, or <i>Macrocercus</i>. About eighteen species are known, all of them American.
They are large and have a very long tail, a strong hooked bill, and a naked space around the eyes. The voice is harsh,
and the colors are brilliant and strongly contrasted.</def></p>
<p> </p>
<p><col><b>Macaw bush</b></col> <i>(Bot.)</i>, <cd>a West Indian name for a prickly kind of nightshade (<i>Solanum
mammosum</i>).</cd> — <col><b>Macaw palm</b></col>, <col><b>Macaw tree</b></col> <i>(Bot.)</i>, <cd>a
tropical American palm (<i>Acrocomia fusiformis</i> and other species) having a prickly stem and pinnately divided
leaves. Its nut yields a yellow butter, with the perfume of violets, which is used in making violet soap. Called also
<i>grugru palm</i>.</cd></p>
<p><hw>Mac`ca*be"an</hw> (?), <pos><i>a.</i></pos> <def>Of or pertaining to Judas Maccabeus or to the
Maccabees; as, the <i>Maccabean</i> princes; <i>Maccabean</i> times.</def></p>
<p><hw>Mac"ca*bees</hw> (?), <pos><i>n. pl.</i></pos> <sn><b>1.</b></sn> <def>The name given in later times to
the Asmon&aelig;ans, a family of Jewish patriots, who headed a religious revolt in the reign of Antiochus IV., 168-161
<u>B. C.</u>, which led to a period of freedom for Israel.</def> <i>Schaff-Herzog.</i></p>
<p><sn><b>2.</b></sn> <def>The name of two ancient historical books, which give accounts of Jewish affairs in or
about the time of the Maccabean princes, and which are received as canonical books in the Roman Catholic Church, but
are included in the Apocrypha by Protestants. Also applied to three books, two of which are found in some MSS. of the
Septuagint.</def></p>
<p><! p. 879 !></p>
<p>{ <hw>Mac"ca*boy</hw> (?), <hw>Mac"co*boy</hw> (?), } <pos><i>n.</i></pos> [From a district in the Island of
Martinique where it is made: cf. F. <i>macouba</i>.] <def>A kind of snuff.</def></p>
<p><hw>Mac"co</hw> (?), <pos><i>n.</i></pos> <def>A gambling game in vogue in the eighteenth century.</def>
<i>Thackeray.</i></p>
<p><hw>Mace</hw> (?), <pos><i>n.</i></pos> [Jav. & Malay. <i>m&amacr;s</i>, fr. Skr. <i>m&amacr;sha</i> a bean.]
<def>A money of account in China equal to one tenth of a tael; also, a weight of 57.98 grains.</def> <i>S. W.
Williams.</i></p>
<p><hw>Mace</hw> (?), <pos><i>n.</i></pos> [F. <i>macis</i>, L. <i>macis</i>, <i>macir</i>, Gr. &?;; cf. Skr.
<i>makar</i>anda the nectar or honey of a flower, a fragrant mango.] <i>(Bot.)</i> <def>A kind of spice; the aril which
partly covers nutmegs. See <u>Nutmeg</u>.</def></p>
<p>&fist; Red <i>mace</i> is the aril of <i>Myristica tingens</i>, and <i>white mace</i> that of <i>M. Otoba</i>, — East
Indian trees of the same genus with the nutmeg tree.</p>
<p><hw>Mace</hw>, <pos><i>n.</i></pos> [OF. <i>mace</i>, F. <i>masse</i>, from (assumed) L. <i>matea</i>, of
which the dim. <i>mateola</i> a kind of mallet or beetle, is found.] <sn><b>1.</b></sn> <def>A heavy staff or club of
metal; a spiked club; — used as weapon in war before the general use of firearms, especially in the Middle Ages, for
breaking metal armor.</def> <i>Chaucer.</i></p>
<p><blockquote>Death with his <i>mace</i> petrific . . . smote.</blockquote> <i>Milton.</i></p>
<p><sn><b>2.</b></sn> Hence: <def>A staff borne by, or carried before, a magistrate as an ensign of his
authority.</def> "Swayed the royal <i>mace</i>." <i>Wordsworth.</i></p>
<p><sn><b>3.</b></sn> <def>An officer who carries a mace as an emblem of authority.</def> <i>Macaulay.</i></p>
<p><sn><b>4.</b></sn> <def>A knobbed mallet used by curriers in dressing leather to make it supple.</def></p>
<p><sn><b>5.</b></sn> <i>(Billiards)</i> <def>A rod for playing billiards, having one end suited to resting on the tableand pushed with one hand.</def></p>
<p><col><b>Mace bearer</b></col>, <cd>an officer who carries a mace before persons in authority.</cd></p>
<p><hw>Mac`e*do"ni*an</hw> (?), <pos><i>a.</i></pos> [L. <i>Macedonius</i>, Gr. &?;.] <i>(Geog.)</i>
<def>Belonging, or relating, to Macedonia.</def> — <pos><i>n.</i></pos> <def>A native or inhabitant of
Macedonia.</def></p>
<p><hw>Mac`e*do"ni*an</hw>, <pos><i>n.</i></pos> <i>(Eccl. Hist.)</i> <def>One of a certain religious sect, followers
of <i>Macedonius</i>, Bishop of Constantinople, in the fourth century, who held that the Holy Ghost was a creature, like
the angels, and a servant of the Father and the Son.</def></p>
<p><hw>Mac`e*do"ni*an*ism</hw> (?), <pos><i>n.</i></pos> <def>The doctrines of Macedonius.</def></p>
<p><hw>Ma"cer</hw> (?), <pos><i>n.</i></pos> [F. <i>massier</i>. See <u>Mace</u> staff.] <def>A mace bearer; an
officer of a court.</def> <i>P. Plowman.</i></p>
<p><hw>Mac"er*ate</hw> (?), <pos><i>v. t.</i></pos> [<pos><i>imp. & p. p.</i></pos> <u>Macerated</u> (?);
<pos><i>p. pr. & vb. n.</i></pos> <u>Macerating</u>.] [L. <i>maceratus</i>, p. p. of <i>macerare</i> to make soft,
weaken, enervate; cf. Gr. &?; to knead.] <sn><b>1.</b></sn> <def>To make lean; to cause to waste away.</def> [Obs.
or R.] <i>Harvey.</i></p>
<p><sn><b>2.</b></sn> <def>To subdue the appetites of by poor and scanty diet; to mortify.</def> <i>Baker.</i></p>
<p><sn><b>3.</b></sn> <def>To soften by steeping in a liquid, with or without heat; to wear away or separate the parts
of by steeping; as, to <i>macerate</i> animal or vegetable fiber.</def></p>
<p><hw>Mac"er*a`ter</hw> (?), <pos><i>n.</i></pos> <def>One who, or that which, macerates; an apparatus for
converting paper or fibrous matter into pulp.</def></p>
<p><hw>Mac`er*a"tion</hw> (?), <pos><i>n.</i></pos> [L. <i>maceratio</i>: cf. F. <i>mac&eacute;ration</i>.]
<def>The act or process of macerating.</def></p>
<p>{ <hw>||Ma*ch&aelig;"ro*dus</hw> (m&adot;*k&emacr;"r&osl;*d&ubreve;s), <hw>||Ma*chai"ro*dus</hw>
(m&adot;*k&imacr;"r&osl;*d&ubreve;s), } <pos><i>n.</i></pos> [NL., fr. Gr. <grk>ma`chaira</grk> dagger +
<grk>'odoy`s</grk> tooth.] <i>(Paleon.)</i> <def>A genus of extinct mammals allied to the cats, and having in the upper
jaw canine teeth of remarkable size and strength; — hence called <i>saber-toothed tigers</i>.</def></p>
<p><hw>||Ma*che"te</hw> (m&adot;*ch&amacr;"t&asl;), <pos><i>n.</i></pos> [Sp.] <def>A large heavy knife
resembling a broadsword, often two or three feet in length, — used by the inhabitants of Spanish America as a hatchet to
cut their way through thickets, and for various other purposes.</def> <i>J. Stevens.</i></p>
<p><hw>Mach`i*a*vel"ian</hw> (?), <pos><i>a.</i></pos> [From <i>Machiavel</i>, an Italian writer, secretary and
historiographer to the republic of Florence.] <def>Of or pertaining to Machiavel, or to his supposed principles; politically
cunning; characterized by duplicity or bad faith; crafty.</def></p>
<p><hw>Mach`i*a*vel"ian</hw>, <pos><i>n.</i></pos> <def>One who adopts the principles of Machiavel; a cunning and
unprincipled politician.</def></p>
<p>{ <hw>Mach"i*a*vel*ism</hw> (?), <hw>Mach`i*a*vel"ian*ism</hw> (?), } <pos><i>n.</i></pos> [Cf. F.
<i>machiav&eacute;lisme</i>; It. <i>machiavellismo</i>.] <def>The supposed principles of Machiavel, or practice in
conformity to them; political artifice, intended to favor arbitrary power.</def></p>
<p><hw>Ma*chic"o*la`ted</hw> (?), <pos><i>a.</i></pos> [LL. <i>machicolatus</i>, p. p. of <i>machicolare</i>,
<i>machicollare</i>. See <u>Machicolation</u>.] <def>Having machicolations.</def> "<i>Machicolated</i> turrets."
<i>C. Kingsley.</i></p>
<p><hw>Mach`i*co*la"tion</hw> (?), <pos><i>n.</i></pos> [Cf. LL. <i>machicolamentum</i>, <i>machacolladura</i>, F.
<i>m&acirc;chicolis</i>, <i>m&acirc;checoulis</i>; perh. fr. F. <i>m&egrave;che</i> match, combustible matter + OF.
<i>coulis</i>, <i>couleis</i>, flowing, fr. OF. & F. <i>couler</i> to flow. Cf. <u>Match</u> for making fire, and
<u>Cullis</u>.]</p>
<p><sn><b>1.</b></sn> <i>(Mil. Arch.)</i> <def>An opening between the corbels which support a projecting parapet, or
in the floor of a gallery or the roof of a portal, for shooting or dropping missiles upon assailants attacking the base of the
walls. Also, the construction of such defenses, in general, when of this character. See <i>Illusts</i>. of <u>Battlement</u>
and <u>Castle</u>.</def></p>
<p><sn><b>2.</b></sn> <def>The act of discharging missiles or pouring burning or melted substances upon assailants
through such apertures.</def></p>
<p><hw>||Ma`chi`cou`lis"</hw> (?), <pos><i>n.</i></pos> [F. <i>m&acirc;chicoulis</i>.] <i>(Mil. Arch.)</i> <def>Same
as <u>Machicolation</u>.</def></p><p><hw>Ma*chin"al</hw> (?), <pos><i>a.</i></pos> [L. <i>machinalis</i>: cf. F. <i>machinal</i>.] <def>Of or pertaining
to machines.</def></p>
<p><hw>Mach"i*nate</hw> (?), <pos><i>v. i.</i></pos> [<pos><i>imp. & p. p.</i></pos> <u>Machinated</u> (?);
<pos><i>p. pr. & vb. n.</i></pos> <u>Machinating</u> (?).] [L. <i>machinatus</i>, p. p. of <i>machinari</i> to devise,
plot. See <u>Machine</u>.] <def>To plan; to contrive; esp., to form a scheme with the purpose of doing harm; to contrive
artfully; to plot.</def> "How long will you <i>machinate</i>!" <i>Sandys.</i></p>
<p><hw>Mach"i*nate</hw> (?), <pos><i>v. t.</i></pos> <def>To contrive, as a plot; to plot; as, to <i>machinate</i>
evil.</def></p>
<p><hw>Mach`i*na"tion</hw> (?), <pos><i>n.</i></pos> [L. <i>machinatio</i>: cf. F. <i>machination</i>.]
<sn><b>1.</b></sn> <def>The act of machinating.</def> <i>Shak.</i></p>
<p><sn><b>2.</b></sn> <def>That which is devised; a device; a hostile or treacherous scheme; an artful design or
plot.</def></p>
<p><blockquote>Devilish <i>machinations</i> come to naught.</blockquote> <i>Milton.</i></p>
<p><blockquote>His ingenious <i>machinations</i> had failed.</blockquote> <i>Macaulay.</i></p>
<p><hw>Mach"i*na`tor</hw> (?), <pos><i>n.</i></pos> [L.] <def>One who machinates, or forms a scheme with evil
designs; a plotter or artful schemer.</def> <i>Glanvill. Sir W. Scott.</i></p>
<p><hw>Ma*chine"</hw> (m&adot;*sh&emacr;n"), <pos><i>n.</i></pos> [F., fr. L. <i>machina</i> machine, engine,
device, trick, Gr. &?;, from &?; means, expedient. Cf. <u>Mechanic</u>.] <sn><b>1.</b></sn> <def>In general, any
combination of bodies so connected that their relative motions are constrained, and by means of which force and motion
may be transmitted and modified, as a screw and its nut, or a lever arranged to turn about a fulcrum or a pulley about its
pivot, etc.; especially, a construction, more or less complex, consisting of a combination of moving parts, or simple
mechanical elements, as wheels, levers, cams, etc., with their supports and connecting framework, calculated to
constitute a prime mover, or to receive force and motion from a prime mover or from another machine, and transmit,
modify, and apply them to the production of some desired mechanical effect or work, as weaving by a loom, or the
excitation of electricity by an electrical machine.</def></p>
<p>&fist; The term <i>machine</i> is most commonly applied to such pieces of mechanism as are used in the industrial
arts, for mechanically shaping, dressing, and combining materials for various purposes, as in the manufacture of cloth,
etc. Where the effect is chemical, or other than mechanical, the contrivance is usually denominated an <i>apparatus</i>,
not a machine; as, a <i>bleaching apparatus</i>. Many large, powerful, or specially important pieces of mechanism are
called <i>engines</i>; as, a <i>steam engine</i>, <i>fire engine</i>, <i>graduating engine</i>, etc. Although there is no
well-settled distinction between the terms <i>engine</i> and machine among practical men, there is a tendency to
restrict the application of the former to contrivances in which the operating part is not distinct from the motor.</p>
<p><sn><b>2.</b></sn> <def>Any mechanical contrivance, as the wooden horse with which the Greeks entered Troy; a
coach; a bicycle.</def> <i>Dryden.</i> <i>Southey.</i> <i>Thackeray.</i></p>
<p><sn><b>3.</b></sn> <def>A person who acts mechanically or at the will of another.</def></p>
<p><sn><b>4.</b></sn> <def>A combination of persons acting together for a common purpose, with the agencies
which they use; as, the social <i>machine</i>.</def></p>
<p><blockquote>The whole <i>machine</i> of government ought not to bear upon the people with a weight so heavy and
oppressive.</blockquote> <i>Landor.</i></p>
<p><sn><b>5.</b></sn> <def>A political organization arranged and controlled by one or more leaders for selfish, private
or partisan ends.</def> [Political Cant]</p>
<p><sn><b>6.</b></sn> <def>Supernatural agency in a poem, or a superhuman being introduced to perform some
exploit.</def> <i>Addison.</i></p>
<p><col><b>Elementary machine</b></col>, <cd>a name sometimes given to one of the simple mechanical powers.
See under <u>Mechanical</u>.</cd> — <col><b>Infernal machine</b></col>. <cd>See under <u>Infernal</u>.</cd> —
<col><b>Machine gun</b></col>.<cd>See under <u>Gun.</u></cd> — <col><b>Machine screw</b></col>, <cd>a
screw or bolt adapted for screwing into metal, in distinction from one which is designed especially to be screwed into
wood.</cd> — <col><b>Machine shop</b></col>, <cd>a workshop where machines are made, or where metal is
shaped by cutting, filing, turning, etc.</cd> — <col><b>Machine tool</b></col>, <cd>a machine for cutting or shaping
wood, metal, etc., by means of a tool; especially, a machine, as a lathe, planer, drilling machine, etc., designed for a
more or less general use in a machine shop, in distinction from a machine for producing a special article as in
manufacturing.</cd> — <col><b>Machine twist</b></col>, <cd>silken thread especially adapted for use in a sewing
machine.</cd> — <col><b>Machine work</b></col>, <cd>work done by a machine, in contradistinction to that done by
hand labor.</cd></p>
<p><hw>Ma*chine"</hw>, <pos><i>v. t.</i></pos> [<pos><i>imp. & p. p.</i></pos> <u>Machined</u> (?); <pos><i>p.pr. & vb. n.</i></pos> <u>Machining</u>.] <def>To subject to the action of machinery; to effect by aid of machinery; to
print with a printing machine.</def></p>
<p><hw>Ma*chin"er</hw> (?), <pos><i>n.</i></pos> <def>One who or operates a machine; a machinist.</def> [R.]</p>
<p><hw>Ma*chin"er*y</hw> (?), <pos><i>n.</i></pos> [From <u>Machine</u>: cf. F. <i>machinerie</i>.]
<sn><b>1.</b></sn> <def>Machines, in general, or collectively.</def></p>
<p><sn><b>2.</b></sn> <def>The working parts of a machine, engine, or instrument; as, the <i>machinery</i> of a
watch.</def></p>
<p><sn><b>3.</b></sn> <def>The supernatural means by which the action of a poetic or fictitious work is carried on and
brought to a catastrophe; in an extended sense, the contrivances by which the crises and conclusion of a fictitious
narrative, in prose or verse, are effected.</def></p>
<p><blockquote>The <i>machinery</i>, madam, is a term invented by the critics, to signify that part which the deities,
angels, or demons, are made to act in a poem.</blockquote> <i>Pope.</i></p>
<p><sn><b>4.</b></sn> <def>The means and appliances by which anything is kept in action or a desired result is
obtained; a complex system of parts adapted to a purpose.</def></p>
<p><blockquote>An indispensable part of the <i>machinery</i> of state.</blockquote> <i>Macaulay.</i></p>
<p><blockquote>The delicate inflexional <i>machinery</i> of the Aryan languages.</blockquote> <i>I. Taylor (The
Alphabet).</i></p>
<p><hw>Ma*chin"ing</hw>, <pos><i>a.</i></pos> <def>Of or pertaining to the machinery of a poem; acting or used as
a machine.</def> [Obs.] <i>Dryden.</i></p>
<p><hw>Ma*chin"ist</hw>, <pos><i>n.</i></pos> [Cf. F. <i>machiniste</i>.] <sn><b>1.</b></sn> <def>A constrictor of
machines and engines; one versed in the principles of machines.</def></p>
<p><sn><b>2.</b></sn> <def>One skilled in the use of machine tools.</def></p>
<p><sn><b>3.</b></sn> <def>A person employed to shift scenery in a theater.</def></p>
<p><hw>Ma"cho</hw> (?), <pos><i>n.</i></pos> [Sp.] <i>(Zo&ouml;l.)</i> <def>The striped mullet of California
(<i>Mugil cephalus, or Mexicanus</i>).</def></p>
<p><hw>Mac"i*len*cy</hw> (?), <pos><i>n.</i></pos> [See <u>Macilent</u>.] <def>Leanness.</def> [Obs.]
<i>Sandys.</i></p>
<p><hw>Mac"i*lent</hw> (?), <pos><i>a.</i></pos> [L. <i>macilentus</i>, fr. <i>macies</i> leanness, <i>macere</i> to
be lean.] <def>Lean; thin.</def> [Obs.] <i>Bailey.</i></p>
<p><hw>Mac"in*tosh</hw> (?), <pos><i>n.</i></pos> <def>Same as <u>Mackintosh</u>.</def></p>
<p><hw>Mack"er*el</hw> (?), <pos><i>n.</i></pos> [OF. <i>maquerel</i>, F. <i>maquereau</i>, fr. D. <i>makelaar</i>
mediator, agent, fr. <i>makelen</i> to act as agent.] <def>A pimp; also, a bawd.</def> [Obs.] <i>Halliwell.</i></p>
<p><hw>Mack`er*el</hw> (?), <pos><i>n.</i></pos> [OF. <i>maquerel</i>, F. <i>maquereau</i> (LL.
<i>macarellus</i>), prob. for <i>maclereau</i>, fr. L. <i>macula</i> a spot, in allusion to the markings on the fish. See
<u>Mail</u> armor.] <i>(Zo&ouml;l.)</i> <def>Any species of the genus <i>Scomber</i>, and of several related genera.
They are finely formed and very active oceanic fishes. Most of them are highly prized for food.</def></p>
<p>&fist; The common mackerel (<i>Scomber scombrus</i>), which inhabits both sides of the North Atlantic, is one of
the most important food fishes. It is mottled with green and blue. The Spanish mackerel (<i>Scomberomorus
maculatus</i>), of the American coast, is covered with bright yellow circular spots.</p>
<p><col><b>Bull mackerel</b></col>, <col><b>Chub mackerel</b></col>. <i>(Zo&ouml;l.)</i> <cd>See under
<u>Chub</u>.</cd> — <col><b>Frigate mackerel</b></col>. <cd>See under <u>Frigate</u>.</cd> — <col><b>Horse
mackerel</b></col> . <cd>See under <u>Horse</u>.</cd> — <col><b>Mackerel bird</b></col> <i>(Zo&ouml;l.)</i>,
<cd>the wryneck; — so called because it arrives in England at the time when mackerel are in season.</cd> —
<col><b>Mackerel cock</b></col> <i>(Zo&ouml;l.)</i>, <cd>the Manx shearwater; — so called because it precedes the
appearance of the mackerel on the east coast of Ireland.</cd> — <col><b>Mackerel guide</b></col>.
<i>(Zo&ouml;l.)</i> <cd>See <u>Garfish</u> <sd><i>(a)</i></sd>.</cd> — <col><b>Mackerel gull</b></col>
<i>(Zo&ouml;l.)</i> <cd>any one of several species of gull which feed upon or follow mackerel, as the kittiwake.</cd> —
<col><b>Mackerel midge</b></col> <i>(Zo&ouml;l.)</i>, <cd>a very small oceanic gadoid fish of the North Atlantic. It is
about an inch and a half long and has four barbels on the upper jaw. It is now considered the young of the genus
<i>Onos</i>, or <i>Motella</i>.</cd> — <col><b>Mackerel plow</b></col>, <cd>an instrument for creasing the sides of
lean mackerel to improve their appearance.</cd> <i>Knight.</i> — <col><b>Mackerel shark</b></col>
<i>(Zo&ouml;l.)</i>, <cd>the porbeagle.</cd> — <col><b>Mackerel sky</b></col>, or <col><b>Mackerel-back