The History of Little King Pippin - With an Account of the Melancholy Death of Four Naughty Boys, Who were Devoured by Wild Beasts. And the Wonderful Delivery of Master Harry Harmless, by a Little White Horse.
30 Pages
English
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The History of Little King Pippin - With an Account of the Melancholy Death of Four Naughty Boys, Who were Devoured by Wild Beasts. And the Wonderful Delivery of Master Harry Harmless, by a Little White Horse.

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30 Pages
English

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The Project Gutenberg eBook, The History of Little King Pippin, by Thomas Bewick This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.org Title: The History of Little King Pippin With an Account of the Melancholy Death of Four Naughty Boys, Who were Devoured by Wild Beasts. And the Wonderful Delivery of Master Harry Harmless, by a Little White Horse. Author: Thomas Bewick Release Date: May 12, 2009 [eBook #28768] Language: English Character set encoding: ISO-8859-1 ***START OF THE PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK THE HISTORY OF LITTLE KING PIPPIN*** E-text prepared by Meredith Bach and the Project Gutenberg Online Distributed Proofreading Team (http://www.pgdp.net) from digital material generously made available by Internet Archive/American Libraries (http://www.archive.org/details/americana) Note: Images of the original pages are available through Internet Archive/American Libraries. See http://www.archive.org/details/historyoflittlek00bewiiala [Pg 1] A King. [Pg 2] Would you be learned, good, and great, Our Hero strive to imitate; For Merit was the only Thing That made poor Pippin's Son a King. THE HISTORY OF LITTLE KING PIPPIN. With an Account of the Melancholy Death of FOUR NAUGHTY BOYS, WHO WERE Devoured by Wild Beasts.

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Published 08 December 2010
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The Project GutenbergeLiBtotloe k,K iTnhge  PHiipsptionr,y  boyfThomas BewickaTlhmioss te Bnooo kr eisst rfiocrt itohnes  uwshea tosfo eavneyro.n e  Yaonuy wmhaeyr ec oapty  noi tc,o sgti vaen di tw iatwhay orwriet-hu steh iist  euBnodoekr  otrh eo ntleirnmes  aotf  wtwhwe. gPurtoejnebcetr gG.uotregnberg License includedTitle: The History of Little King PippinWith an Account of the Melancholy Death of FourNaughty Boys, Who were Devoured by Wild Beasts.And the Wonderful Delivery of Master Harry Harmless,by a Little White Horse.Author: Thomas BewickRelease Date: May 12, 2009 [eBook #28768]Language: EnglishCharacter set encoding: ISO-8859-1***START OF THE PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOKTHE HISTORY OF LITTLE KING PIPPIN*** E-text prepared by Meredith Bachand the Project Gutenberg Online DistributedProofreading Team(http://www.pgdp.net)from digital material generously madeavailable byInternet Archive/American Libraries(http://www.archive.org/details/americana)  Note:Images of the original pages are available throughInternet Archive/American Libraries. Seehttp://www.archive.org/details/historyoflittlek00bewiiala
 AK nig.[[gPgP  12]]
Would you belearned, good, andgreat,Our Hero strive toimitate;For Merit was theonly ThingThat made poorPippin's Son a.gniKTHE HISTORYOF LITTLEKING PIPPIN.With an Account of the MelancholyDeath of
FOUR NAUGHTY BOYS,WHO WEREDevoured by Wild Beasts.AND THEWonderful Delivery of Master HarryHarmless,by a littleWHITE HORSE.ORNAMENTED WITH CUTS.WELLINGTON:Printed by F. Houlston and Son.Price Two-pence.THE HISTORYOFLITTLE KING PIPPIN.Peter Pippin was the son of Gaffer and GammerPippin,[Pg 3][Pg 4][Pg 5]
AWnhdo i fl itvh'de ya ta trhee n Iovty -ghoonues, et huenyd lievr et hthe ehriell ,still.This is the house, and a pretty little snug place itis, and there is Peter and his father and motherat the door. Daddy, says Peter, I wish I couldhave another pretty little Picture-Book, for I haveread Mrs. Lovechild's Golden Present so often,that I can repeat it without book. I am very glad tohear it, Peter, says his father, and I wish I couldafford to buy you books as fast as you can learnthem. I have been saving a penny a week thesefive weeks, to buy the LADDER to LEARNINGfor you: well then, says Peter, I have got apenny, which was given me this morning by MissKitty Kindness, so that will make sixpence: Odear, I should like vastly to have the Ladder toLearning, and you shall see how fast I will climbup it; pray give me your fivepence, rather, and Iwill run to Farmer Giles with it directly, and desirehim to bring it down for me, when he goes toTown next week; and away he ran to FarmerGiles, and gave him the money to buy theLadder to Learning. You can't miss the shop,says Peter, it is just in the midst of the Town, theonly place where all the pretty little books aresold: for, though Peter had never been in Town,[Pg 6][Pg 7]
he knew as well as could be, where his old friendthe Publisher lived.Now a great many silly boys would have spentthat penny in apples or gingerbread, or somesuch trash, and when they had eaten it, whatwould they have been the better for it? Whynothing at all; but Peter did not lay out his moneyin such an idle manner; whenever he got apenny, he bought food for his mind, instead ofhis belly, and you will find he afterwards reapedthe benefit of it.Well, the next week Peter had his new book, andhere he sits reading it under the hedge, wherehe was sent to keep away the crows fromFarmer Giles's corn; and you see he neitherneglected his book nor his work.Away, Away, John Carrion Crow,Your Master hath enowDown in his Barley Mow.See how he makes them fly, and as soon asthey are gone, out he whips his little book, andreads till they come back again; for Gaffer Pippin,being but a poor labouring man, could not afford[Pg 8]
toou tk teoe pw oPrekt, etrh oatu gshc hhoeo lw; asso  bhuet  swiax sy eoablrisg eoldd .to goBut good fortune is generally attendant on goodand virtuous actions, and so it happened toPeter, who was certainly one of the best boys inthe whole country; he always did what his fatherand mother bid him, not only without murmuring,but with pleasure in his countenance; he neverwent to bed, or got up in the morning, withoutkneeling down by his bed-side to say hisprayers; nor was he ever known to tell a fib, orsay a naughty word, or to quarrel with his play-fellows.[Pg 9]
As he was coming home from work one evening,wishing for another new book, he could not helpcrying, because he had no money to buy one; sobeing met by Lady Bountiful, whose country seatwas but a small distance from the little Ivy-house,she asked him what he cried for? Peter wasafraid to tell at first, lest she should be angry withhim; but her Ladyship insisted on knowing, and
Peter was determined never to tell a fib, so outcame the truth. Well, says she, Peter, you neednot have been ashamed to tell me, there is noharm in it; dry up your tears. I know you are agood boy, very dutiful to your parents, andobliging to every one, and since I find you are sodesirous of improving your mind, you shall not bedeprived of the benefit of education because youare poor; so do you and your father come to meto-morrow morning, and I will see what I can dofor you. Peter returned her Ladyship a greatmany thanks, made one of his best bows, andran home whistling and singing as merry as agrig. As soon as he got within side the door,Good news, good news, says he, father; youand I are to go to Lady Bountiful's to morrow-morning; I believe her Ladyship is going to putme to school: Peter's head was so full of it, thathe scarce slept a wink all the night, and he gotup the next morning at four o'clock, put on hisSunday clothes, washed his face and hands,combed out his hair, and looked as brisk as abee; and about six o'clock, away his father andhe trudged to Lady Bountiful's; as soon as theyarrived, they were ordered into her Ladyship'sparlour. Well, says she, Gaffer Pippin, since youcannot afford to put Peter to school, I will sendhim at my own expence: so carry this letter to Mr.Teachum the Schoolmaster, and he will be takenas much care of as if he were my own son. Athousand blessings on your Ladyship, says theold man, I hope God Almighty will reward you foryour goodness to my poor boy. It is no more thanPeter deserves, says her Ladyship, and as longas he continues such a good boy, he shall notwant a friend; but make haste away with him,Gaffer Pippin, or you will not get there before it isdark, for they had near twenty miles to walk: sotaking Peter in his hand, they set off towards theschool; but they had not walked above a mile ortwo, before they were overtaken by agentleman's coach, which stopped as soon as itcame up with them, and the gentleman lookingout, asked if that was not little Peter Pippin,whom he had heard was such a good boy? Yes,Sir, replied Gaffer Pippin, it is. Indeed, says the[Pg 10][Pg 11]
gentleman, I thought so, from that good natureso visible in his countenance: pray, how far areyou going? To Mr. Teachum's School, Sir,replied Peter. A very fortunate meeting, says thegentleman, I am going to the very same placewith my two sons, so you shall ride with them inmy coach; you need not trouble yourself to goany farther, Gaffer Pippin; I will take care of yourson: so thanking the gentleman for his kindness,and bestowing his blessing on Peter, the oldman returned home to his work. As soon asPeter was seated in the coach, the gentlemaninformed him, he was going to a school where hewould meet with kind usage and goodentertainment: you live very well, says he to hisson, don't you, Tommy? Yes, Sir, very well,replied Tommy, we have apple-pie two or threetimes a week; then I dare say, you know how tospell apple-pie, don't you, Tommy? O yes, Sir,ap-pel-pey. And how do you spell it, Billy? sayshe to his other son, ap-pel-pye. And how do youspell it, Peter? ap-ple-pie, Sir: that's right, you area good boy, and there is a sixpence for you; andas for you two dunces, I will take care you shallneither of you have another bit of apple-pie, tillyou know how to spell it; and he was as good ashis word; for though all the rest of the boys hadapple-pie the next day for dinner, neither of themwere suffered to eat a bit, because they had notlearned to spell it; so they were obliged to sit andlook at the rest, like two blockheads as they.erew[Pg 12]
The same affable behaviour which had gainedhim the esteem of all his acquaintance at home,soon made little Peter equally respected atschool; nay, all the good boys were so pleasedwith the sweetness of his temper, and the goodadvice which he always gave them, when anyquarrel or disagreement happened betweenthem, that they came to a resolution to elect himtheir King, by the title of the King of the GoodBoys, and he was always afterwards called[Pg 13]