The History of Tom Thumb - to which are added the stories of the Cat and the Mouse and Fire! Fire! Burn stick!

The History of Tom Thumb - to which are added the stories of the Cat and the Mouse and Fire! Fire! Burn stick!

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Project Gutenberg's The History of Tom Thumb, and Others, by Anonymous This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.org Title: The History of Tom Thumb, and Others Author: Anonymous Editor: Henry Altemus Release Date: November 17, 2008 [EBook #1988] Language: English Character set encoding: ASCII *** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK HISTORY OF TOM THUMB *** Produced by An Anonymous Volunteer, and David Widger THE HISTORY OF TOM THUMB To which are added THE STORIES OF THE CAT AND THE MOUSE and FIRE! FIRE! BURN STICK! Edited by Henry Altemus Contents THE HISTORY OF TOM THUMB THE CAT AND THE MOUSE FIRE! FIRE! BURN STICK! THE HISTORY OF TOM THUMB It is said that in the days of the famed Prince Arthur, who was king of Britain, in the year 516, there lived a great magician, called Merlin, the most learned and skilful enchanter in the world at that time. This great magician, who could assume any form he pleased, was travelling in the disguise of a poor beggar, and being very much fatigued, he stopped at the cottage of an honest ploughman to rest himself, and asked for some refreshment. The countryman gave him a hearty welcome, and his wife, who was a very good-hearted, hospital woman, soon brought him some milk in a wooden bowl, an some coarse brown bread on a platter.

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Project Gutenberg's The History of Tom Thumb, and Others, by AnonymousThis eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and withalmost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away orre-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License includedwith this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.orgTitle: The History of Tom Thumb, and OthersAuthor: AnonymousEditor: Henry AltemusRelease Date: November 17, 2008 [EBook #1988]Language: EnglishCharacter set encoding: ASCII*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK HISTORY OF TOM THUMB ***Produced by An Anonymous Volunteer, and David WidgerTHE HISTORY OF TOM THUMBTo which are added THE STORIES OF THE CAT AND THEMaOnUdS E FIRE! FIRE! BURN STICK!Edited by Henry AltemusContents
THE HISTORY OFTOM THUMBTHE CAT AND THEESUOMFIRE! FIRE! BURNSTICK!THE HISTORY OF TOM THUMBIt is said that in the days of the famed Prince Arthur, whowas king of Britain, in the year 516, there lived a greatmagician, called Merlin, the most learned and skilfulenchanter in the world at that time.This great magician, who could assume any form hepleased, was travelling in the disguise of a poor beggar,and being very much fatigued, he stopped at the cottage ofan honest ploughman to rest himself, and asked for somerefreshment.The countryman gave him a hearty welcome, and hiswife, who was a very good-hearted, hospital woman, soonbrought him some milk in a wooden bowl, an some coarsebrown bread on a platter.Merlin was much pleased with this homely repast andthe kindness of the ploughman and his wife; but he couldnot help seeing that though everything was neat andcomfortable in the cottage, they seemed both be sad andmuch cast down. He therefore questioned them on thecause of their sadness, and learned they were miserablebecause they had no children.The poor woman declared, with tears in her eyes, thatshe should be the happiest creature in the world if she hada son; and although he was no bigger than her husband'sthumb, she would be satisfied.Merlin was so much amused with the idea of a boy nobigger than a man's thumb, that he made up his mind topay a visit to the queen of the fairies, and ask her to grantthe poor woman's wish. The droll fancy of such a littleperson among the human race pleased the fairy queentoo, greatly, and she promised Merlin that the wish shouldbe granted. Accordingly, a short time after, theploughman's wife had a son, who, wonderful to relate! wasnot bigger than his father's thumb.The fairy queen, wishing to see the little fellow thus borninto the world, came in at the window while the motherwas sitting up in bed admiring him. The queen kissed thechild, and, giving it the name of Tom Thumb, sent for some
of the fairies, who dressed her little favorite as she bade.meht       " A nH iosa ks-hlieratf  ohfa tw ehbe  bhya ds pfiodre rhsi ss pcurno;wn;      W i t hH ijsa ctkreotw sweorvse  woefr et ohfi sftelaet'hse rdso wdno;ne.      WHiitsh  setyoeclkaisnhg sf,r oomf  haipsp lmeo-trhienrd' st heeyye :tie      THainsn 'sdh oweist hw etrhee  mdadoew noyf  hmaoiurs ew'ist hsikni.n"It is remarkable that Tom never grew any larger than hisfather's thumb, which was only of an ordinary size; but ashe got older he became very cunning and full of tricks.When he was old enough to play with the boys, and hadlost all his own cherry-stones, he used to creep into thebags of his playfellows, fill his pockets, and, getting outunseen, would again join in the game.One day, however, as he was coming out of a bag ofcherrystones, where he had been pilfering as usual, theboy to whom it belonged chanced to see him. "Ah, ha! mylittle Tommy," said the boy, "so I have caught you stealingmy cherrystones at last, and you shall be rewarded foryour thievish tricks." On saying this, he drew the stringtight around his neck, and gave the bag such a heartyshake, that poor little Tom's legs, thighs, and body weresadly bruised. He roared out in pain, and begged to be letout, promising never to be guilty of such bad practicesagain.A short time afterwards his mother was making a batter-pudding, and Tom being very anxious to see how it wasmade, climbed up to the edge of the bowl; butunfortunately his foot slipped and he plumped over headand ears into the batter, unseen by his mother, who stirredhim into the pudding-bag, and put him in the pot to boil.The batter had filled Tom's mouth, and prevented himfrom crying; but, on feeling the hot water, he kicked andstruggled so much in the pot, that his mother thought thatthe pudding was bewitched, and, instantly pulling it out ofthe pot, she threw it to the door. A poor tinker, who waspassing by, lifted up the pudding, and, putting it into hisbudget, he then walked off. As Tom had now got hismouth cleared of the batter, he then began to cry aloud,which so frightened the tinker that he flung down thepudding and ran away. The pudding being broke to piecesby the fall, Tom crept out covered over with the batter, andwith difficulty walked home. His mother, who was verysorry to see her darling in such a woeful state, put him intoa tea-cup, and soon washed off the batter; after which shekissed him, and laid him in bed.Soon after the adventure of the pudding, Tom's motherwent to milk her cow in the meadow, and she took himalong with her. As the wind was very high, fearing lest heshould be blown away, she tied him to a thistle with apiece of fine thread. The cow soon saw the oak-leaf hat,and, liking the look of it, took poor Tom and the thistle at
one mouthful. While the cow was chewing the thistle Tomwas afraid of her great teeth, which threatened to crushhim in pieces, and he roared out as loud as he could:"Mother, mother!""Where are you, Tommy, my dear Tommy?" said hismother."Here, mother," replied he, "in the red cow's mouth."His mother began to cry and wring her hands; but thecow, surprised at the odd noise in her throat, opened hermouth and let Tom drop out. Fortunately his mother caughthim in her apron as he was falling to the ground, or hewould have been dreadfully hurt. She then put Tom in herbosom and ran home with him.Tom's father made him a whip of barley straw to drivethe cattle with, and having one day gone into the fields, heslipped a foot and rolled into the furrow. A raven, whichwas flying over, picked him up and flew with him to the topof a giant's castle that was near the seaside, and there left.mihTom was in a dreadful state, and did not know what todo; but he was soon more dreadfully frightened; for oldGrumbo, the giant, came up to walk on the terrace, andseeing Tom, he took him up and swallowed him like a pill.The giant had no sooner swallowed Tom than he beganto repent what he had done; for Tom began to kick andjump about so much that he felt very uncomfortable, and atlast threw him up again into the sea. A large fishswallowed Tom the moment he fell into the sea, whichwas soon after caught, and bought for the table of KingArthur. When they opened the fish in order to cook it, everyon was astonished at finding such a little boy, and Tomwas quite delighted to be out again. They carried him tothe king, who made Tom his dwarf, and he soon grew agreat favorite at court: for by his tricks and gambols he notonly amused the king and queen, but also all the knightsof the Round Table.It is said that when the kind rode out on horseback heoften took Tom along with him, and if a shower came onhe used to creep into his majesty's waistcoat pocket,where he slept till the rain was over.King Arthur one day asked Tom about his parents,wishing to know if they were as small as he was, andwhether rich or poor. Tom told the king that his father andmother were as tall as any of the persons about the court,but rather poor. On hearing this the king carried Tom to thetreasure, the place where he kept all his money, and toldhim to take as much money as he could carry home to hisparents, which made the poor little fellow caper with joy.Tom went immediately to fetch a purse, which was madeof a water-bubble, and then returned to the treasury, wherehe got a silver three-penny-piece to put into it.
Our little hero had some trouble in lifting the burdenupon his back; but he at last succeeded in getting it placedto his mind, and set forward on his journey. However,without meeting with any accidents, and after restinghimself more than a hundred times by the way, in two daysand two nights he reached his father's house in safety.Tom had travelled forty-eight hours with a huge silver-piece on his back, and was almost tired to death, when hismother ran out to meet him, and carried him into thehouse.Tom's parents were both happy to see him, and themore so as he had brought such an amazing sum ofmoney with him; but the poor little fellow was excessivelywearied, having travelled half a mile in forty-eight hours,with a huge silver three-penny-piece on his back. Hismother, in order to recover him, placed him in a walnutshell by the fireside, and feasted him for three days on ahazel nut, which made him very sick; for a whole nut usedto serve him a month.Tom was soon well again; but as there had been a fallof rain, and the ground was very wet, he could not travelback to King Arthur's court; therefore his mother, one daywhen the wind was blowing in that direction, made a littleparasol of cambric paper, and tying Tom to it, she gavehim a puff into the air with her mouth, which soon carriedhim to the king's palace.Just at the time when Tom came flying across thecourtyard, the cook happened to be passing with theking's great bowl of furmenty, which was a dish hismajesty was very fond of; but unfortunately the poor littlefellow fell plump into the middle of it, and splashed the hotfurmenty about the cook's face.The cook, who was an ill-natured fellow, being in aterrible rage at Tom for frightening and scalding him withthe furmenty, went straight to the king, and said that Tomhad jumped into the royal furmenty, and thrown it down outof mere mischief. The king was so enraged when heheard this, that he ordered Tom to be seized and tried forhigh treason; and there being no person who dared toplead for him, he was condemned to be beheadedimmediately.On hearing this dreadful sentence pronounced, poorTom fell a-trembling with fear, but, seeing no means ofescape, and observing a miller close to him gaping withhis great mouth, as country boobies do at a far, he took aleap, and fairly jumped down his throat. This exploit wasdone with such activity that not one person present saw it,and even the miller did not know the trick which Tom hadplayed upon him. Now, as Tom had disappeared, thecourt broke up, and the miller went home to his mill.When Tom heard the mill at work he knew he was clearof the court, and therefore he began to tumble and rollabout, so that the poor miller could get no rest, thinking he
was bewitched; so he sent for a doctor. When the doctorcame, Tom began to dance and sing; and the doctor,being as much frightened as the miller, sent in haste forfive other doctors and twenty learned men.When they were debating about this extraordinary case,the miller happened to yawn, when Tom, seizing thechance, made another jump, and alighted safely upon hisfeet in the middle of the table.The miller, who was very much provoked at beingtormented by such a little pygmy creature, fell into aterrible rage, and, laying hold of Tom, ran to the king withhim; but his majesty, being engaged with state affairs,ordered him to be taken away and kept in custody till hesent for him.The cook was determined that Tom should not slip outof his hands this time, so he put him into a mouse-trap,and left him to peep through the wires. Tom had remainedin the trap a whole week, when he was sent for by KingArthur, who pardoned him for throwing down the furmenty,and took him again into favor. On account of his wonderfulfeats of activity, Tom was knighted by the king, and wentunder the name of the renowned Sir Thomas Thumb. AsTom's clothes had suffered much in the batter-pudding,the furmenty, and the insides of the giant, miller, andfishes, his majesty ordered him a new suit of clothes, andto be mounted as a knight.       " O fH iBsu tbtoeortfsl yo'fs  cwhiincgkse nh'iss  hsihdier;t was made,   And by a nimble fairy blade,      Well learned in the tailoring trade,      His clothing was supplied.—   A needle dangled by his side;      TAh udsa pspterru tmtoeuds eT ohme  iuns esdt attoe lryi dper,ide!"  It was certainly very diverting to see Tom in this dress, andnmoobuinltietdy ,o nw htoh ew emroeu sael,l  arse ahdey  rtood ee xopuitr ea -whiutnht ilnagu gwhittehr  tahte  Tkoimn ga nadn dhis fineprancing charger.One day, as they were riding by a farmhouse, a largecat, which was lurking about the door, made a spring, andseized both Tom and his mouse. She then ran up a treewith them, and was beginning to devour the mouse; butTom boldly drew his sword, and attacked the cat sofiercely that she let them both fall, when one of the noblescaught him in his hat, and laid him on a bed of down, in alittle ivory cabinet.The queen of fairies came soon after to pay Tom a visit,and carried him back to Fairy-land, where he lived severalyears. During his residence there, King Arthur, and all thepersons who knew Tom, had died; and as he wasdesirous of being again at court, the fairy queen, afterdressing him in a suit of clothes, sent him flying throughthe air to the palace, in the days of king Thunstone, thesuccessor of Arthur. Every one flocked round to see him,and being carried to the king, he was asked who he was—
whence he came—and where he lived? Tom answered:   "My name is Tom Thumb,      WFhreonm  Ktihneg  fAaritrhiuers  sIh'ovnee ,come.      HIins  mceo uhret  dwealsi ghmtye dh,ome.      DBiyd  hyiomu  In ewvaesr  khneiagrh toefd ;Sir Thomas Thumb?"The king was so charmed with this address that heordered a little chair to be made, in order that Tom mightsit upon his table, and also a palace of gold, a span high,with a door an inch wide, to live in. He also gave him acoach, drawn by six small mice.The queen was so enraged at the honor paid to SirThomas that she resolved to ruin him, and told the kingthat the little knight had been saucy to her.The king sent for Tom in great haste, but being fullyaware of the danger of royal anger, he crept into an emptysnail-shell, where he lay for a long time, until he wasalmost starved with hunger; but at last he ventured to peepout, and seeing a fine large butterfly on the ground, nearhis hiding-place, he approached very cautiously, andgetting himself placed astride on it, was immediatelycarried up into the air. The butterfly flew with him from treeto tree and from field to field, and at last returned to thecourt, where the king and nobility all strove to catch him;but at last poor Tom fell from his seat into a watering-pot,in which he was almost drowned.When the queen saw him she was in a rage, and saidhe should be beheaded; and he was again put into amouse-trap until the time of his execution.However, a cat, observing something alive in the trap,patted it about till the wires broke, and set Thomas atliberty.The king received Tom again into favor, which he didnot live to enjoy, for a large spider one day attacked him;and although he drew his sword and fought well, yet thespider's poisonous breath at last overcame him;      a"nHde  tfheel ls pdiedaedr  osnu ctkh'ed  gervoeurnyd  dwrhoepr eo fh eh isst oboldo,od."King Thunstone and his whole court were so sorry atthe loss of their little favorite, that they went into mourning,and raised a fine white marble monument over his grave,with the following epitaph:      W"hHoe rdei elyde sb yT oam  sTphiudmebr,' sK icnrgu eAlr tbhiutre'.s knight,   He was well known in Arthur's court,      HWeh erreo dhee  aatf ftoirldte da ngda ltloaunrtn asmpeonrtt,;      AAlnidv eo nh ea  fmiolulseed  at-hheu ntcionugr tw ewnitt.h mirth;   His death to sorrow soon gave birth.      AWnidp ec,r yw,ipAel ayso!u r  Teoyme sT,h uamnbd  issh adkeea dy!o"ur head,
THE CAT AND THE MOUSE       T h eP lcaayte da nidn  thteh em omuaslet-house:The cat bit the mouse's tail off. "Pray, puss, give me mytail." "No," says the cat, "I'll not give you your tail, till yougo to the cow and fetch me some milk."      FTiilrls ts hseh ec almeea ptto,  tahned  ctohwe,n  asnhde  trhauns, began,"Pray, cow, give me milk, that I may give cat milk, thatcat may give me my own tail again." "No," said the cow, "Iwill give you no milk, till you go to the farmer and get mesome hay."      TFiilrls ts hseh ec almeea ptto,  tahned  ftahremne rs,h ea nrda nt,hus began,"Pray, farmer, give me hay that I may give cow hay, thatcow may give me milk, that I may give cat milk, that catmay give me my own tail again.""No," says the farmer, "I'll give you no hay, till you go tothe butcher and fetch me some meat."      TFiilrls ts hseh ec almeea ptto,  tahned  btuhtecnh esrh,e  arnadn ,thus began,"Pray, butcher, give me meat, that I may give farmermeat, that farmer may give me hay, that I may give cowhay, that cow may give me milk, that I may give cat milk,that cat may give me my own tail again.""No," says the butcher, "I'll give you no meat till you goto the baker and fetch me some bread."   First she leapt, and then she ran,   Till she came to the baker, and thus began,—"Pray, baker, give me bread, that I may give butcherbread, that butcher may give me meat, that I may givefarmer meat, that farmer may give me hay, that I may givecow hay, that cow may give me milk, that I may give catmilk, that cat may give me my own tail again."      "BYuets ,i"f  syaoyus  etahte  mbya mkeearl,,  "II''llll  cguitv eo fyfo uy osuorm eh ebarde.a"d,Then the baker gave mouse bread, and mouse gavebutcher bread, and butcher gave mouse meat, and mousegave farmer meat, and farmer gave mouse hay, andmouse gave cow hay, and cow gave mouse milk, andmouse gave cat milk, and cat gave mouse her own tailagain!
FIRE! FIRE! BURN STICK!And old woman was sweeping her house, and shefound a little crooked sixpence. "What," said she, "shall Ido with this little sixpence? I will go to market and buy alittle pig." As she was coming home she came to a stile;the piggy would not go over the stile.She went a little farther, and she met a dog. So she saidto the dog, "Dog! bit pig; piggy won't go over the stile, and Ishan't get home to-night." But the dog would not.She went a little farther, and she met a stick. So shesaid, "Stick! stick! beat dog; dog won't bite pig; piggy won'tget over the stile, and I shan't get home to-night." But thestick would not.She went a little farther, and she met a fire. So she said,"Fire! fire! burn stick; stick won't beat dog; dog won't bitepig; piggy won't get over the stile, and I shan't get home to-night." But the fire would not.She went a little farther, and she met some water. Soshe said, "Water! water! quench fire; fire won't burn stick;stick wont beat dog; dog won't bite pig; piggy won't getover the stile, and I shan't get home to-night." But thewater would not.She went a little farther, and she met an ox. So she said,"Ox! ox! drink water; water won't quench fire; fire won'tburn stick; stick won't beat dog; dog won't bite pig; piggywon't get over the stile, and I shan't get home to-night." Butthe ox would not.She went a little farther, and she met a butcher. So shesaid, "Butcher! butcher! kill ox; ox won't drink water; waterwon't quench fire; fire won't burn stick; stick won't beatdog; dog won't bite pig; piggy won't get over the stile, and Ishan't get home to-night." But the butcher would not.She went a little father, and she met a rope. So shesaid, "Rope! rope! hang butcher; butcher won't kill ox; oxwon't drink water; water won't quench fire; fire won't burnstick; stick won't beat dog; dog won't bite pig; piggy won'tget over the stile, and I shan't get home to-night." But therope would not.So she went a little farther, and she met a rat. So shesaid, "Rat! rat! gnaw rope; rope won't hang butcher;butcher won't kill ox; ox won't drink water; water won'tquench fire; fire won't burn stick; stick won't beat dog; dogwon't bite pig; piggy won't get over the stile and I shan't gethome to-night." But the rat would not.So she went a little farther, and she met a cat. So shesaid, "Cat! cat! kill rat; rat won't gnaw rope; rope won'thang butcher; butcher won't kill ox; ox won't drink water;water won't quench fire; fire won't burn stick; stick won't
beat dog; dog won't bite pig; piggy won't get over the stile,and I shan't get home to-night." But the cat said to her, "Ifyou will go to yonder cow and fetch me a saucer of milk, Iwill kill the rat." So away went the old woman to the cow.But the cow said to her, "If you will go to yonderhaystack and fetch me a handful of hay, I'll give you themilk." So away went the old woman to the haystack; andshe brought the hay to the cow.As soon as the cow had eaten the hay she gave the oldwoman the milk, and away she went with it in a saucer tothe cat.As soon as the cat had lapped up the milk, the catbegan to kill the rat; the rat began to gnaw the rope; therope began to hang the butcher; the butcher began to killthe ox; the ox began to drink the water; the water began toquench the fire; the fire began to burn the stick; the stickbegan to beat the dog; the dog began to bite the pig; thelittle pig in a fright jumped over the stile; and so the oldwoman got home that night.End of Project Gutenberg's The History of Tom Thumb, and Others, by Anonymous*** END OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK HISTORY OF TOM THUMB ******** This file should be named 1988-h.htm or 1988-h.zip *****This and all associated files of various formats will be found in:        http://www.gutenberg.org/1/9/8/1988/Produced by An Anonymous Volunteer, and David WidgerUpdated editions will replace the previous one--the old editionswill be renamed.Creating the works from public domain print editions means that noone owns a United States copyright in these works, so the Foundation(and you!) can copy and distribute it in the United States withoutpermission and without paying copyright royalties. Special rules,set forth in the General Terms of Use part of this license, apply tocopying and distributing Project Gutenberg-tm electronic works toprotect the PROJECT GUTENBERG-tm concept and trademark. ProjectGutenberg is a registered trademark, and may not be used if youcharge for the eBooks, unless you receive specific permission. If youdo not charge anything for copies of this eBook, complying with therules is very easy. You may use this eBook for nearly any purposesuch as creation of derivative works, reports, performances andresearch. They may be modified and printed and given away--you may dopractically ANYTHING with public domain eBooks. Redistribution issubject to the trademark license, especially commercialredistribution.*** START: FULL LICENSE ***PTLHEEA SFEU LRLE APDR OTJHEICST  BGEUFTOERNEB EYROGU  LDIICSETNRSEIBUTE OR USE THIS WORK
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