The Life and Work of Susan B. Anthony (Volume 2 of 2) - Including Public Addresses, Her Own Letters and Many From - Her Contemporaries During Fifty Years

The Life and Work of Susan B. Anthony (Volume 2 of 2) - Including Public Addresses, Her Own Letters and Many From - Her Contemporaries During Fifty Years

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The Project Gutenberg EBook of The Life and Work of Susan B. Anthony(Volume 2 of 2), by Ida Husted HarperThis eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and withalmost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away orre-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License includedwith this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.orgTitle: The Life and Work of Susan B. Anthony (Volume 2 of 2)Including Public Addresses, Her Own Letters and Many FromHer Contemporaries During Fifty YearsAuthor: Ida Husted HarperRelease Date: January 30, 2010 [EBook #31125]Language: English*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK SUSAN B. ANTHONY ***Produced by Jonathan Ingram, Richard J. Shiffer and theOnline Distributed Proofreading Team at http://www.pgdp.netTranscriber's NoteEvery effort has been made to replicate this text as faithfully as possible, including obsolete and variant spellingsand other inconsistencies. Text that has been changed to correct an obvious error is noted at the end of this ebook.Also, many occurrences of mismatched quotes remain as they were in the original.This book contains links to "The Life and Work of Susan B. Anthony," Volume I, contained in the Project Gutenbergcollection. Although we verify the correctness of these links at the time of posting, these links may not work, forvarious reasons, for various people, at various times.T H E L I F E A N D W O R KO FS U S A N B . A N T H O N YINCLUDING PUBLIC ADDRESSES, HER ...

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The Project Gutenberg EBook of The Life and Work of
Susan B. Anthony
(Volume 2 of 2), by Ida Husted Harper
This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no
cost and with
almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it,
give it away or
re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg
License included
with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.org
Title: The Life and Work of Susan B. Anthony (Volume
2 of 2)
Including Public Addresses, Her Own Letters and
Many From
Her Contemporaries During Fifty Years
Author: Ida Husted Harper
Release Date: January 30, 2010 [EBook #31125]
Language: English
*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK
SUSAN B. ANTHONY ***Produced by Jonathan Ingram, Richard J. Shiffer and
the
Online Distributed Proofreading Team at
http://www.pgdp.net
Transcriber's Note
Every effort has been made to replicate this text as
faithfully as possible, including obsolete and variant
spellings and other inconsistencies. Text that has been
changed to correct an obvious error is noted at the
end of this ebook.
Also, many occurrences of mismatched quotes remain
as they were in the original.
This book contains links to "The Life and Work of
Susan B. Anthony," Volume I, contained in the Project
Gutenberg collection. Although we verify the
correctness of these links at the time of posting, these
links may not work, for various reasons, for various
people, at various times.
THE LIFE AND WORK
OFSUSAN B. ANTHONY
INCLUDING PUBLIC ADDRESSES, HER OWN
LETTERS
AND MANY FROM HER CONTEMPORARIES
DURING FIFTY YEARS
BY
IDA HUSTED HARPER
A Story of the Evolution of the Status of Woman
IN TWO VOLUMES
VOLUME II
ILLUSTRATED WITH PORTRAITS, PICTURES OF
HOMES, ETC.
indianapolis and kansas city
THE BOWEN-MERRILL COMPANY
1898Copyright 1898
by
THE BOWEN-MERRILL COMPANY
TO WOMAN, FOR WHOSE FREEDOM
SUSAN B. ANTHONY
HAS GIVEN FIFTY YEARS OF NOBLE ENDEAVOR
THIS BOOK IS DEDICATED
SUSAN B. ANTHONY. In the California Campaign.
1896. SUSAN B. ANTHONY.
In the California Campaign. 1896.
TABLE OF CONTENTS.
Vol. II.
CHAPTER XXX.
Political Candidates—Writing the History. (1880-
1881.)515-532
Miss Anthony's rallying cry; letter on death of sister;
Convention at Indianapolis; Mass Meeting in Farwell
Hall, Chicago; suffrage advocates neither unmarried
nor childless; Republican National Convention refuses
even "recognition" plank of former years; Greenback-
Labor Convention passes Woman Suffrage resolution
in spite of Dennis Kearney; Democratic Convention at
Cincinnati receives ladies with great courtesy but
ignores their claims; tribute of Commercial; ProhibitionConvention adopts Suffrage plank; interviews with
Garfield and Hancock; correspondence of General
Garfield and Miss Anthony on Woman Suffrage;
martyrdom to writing the History; Thirteenth
Washington Convention and memorial service to
Lucretia Mott; ridiculous press items on Skye terrier;
letter on sparing parents for children's sake; first
volume of History issued.
CHAPTER XXXI.
The Legacy—Nebraska Campaign—Off for Europe.
(1881-1882-1883.)533-550
National Association in Boston; badge presented Miss
Anthony by Philadelphia Citizens' Suffrage
Association; comments of Traveller and Globe; sweep
of New England; tribute of Zerelda G. Wallace; no
welcome for Miss Anthony in Albany; letter on death of
Garfield; attends National W. C. T. U. Convention in
Washington; Phillips' seventieth birthday; Mrs. Eddy's
handsome legacy; Fourteenth Washington
Convention; amusing suffrage debate in Senate;
meeting in Philadelphia; tributes from Elmira Free
Press and Washington Republic; favorable Senate and
House Committee reports; campaign in Nebraska;
addresses Lincoln Club, Rochester; decides to go
abroad; Philadelphia Times account of Birthday
reception; Mrs. Sewall's description in Indianapolis
Times of farewell honors; fine tributes from Chicago
Tribune and Kansas City Journal; N. Y. Times
describes departure for Europe.
CHAPTER XXXII.Miss Anthony's European Letters. (1883.)551-579
On shipboard; in Liverpool and London; in Milan and
Rome; in Naples; in Zurich, Berlin, Cologne,
Heidelberg; in Paris; back to London; Mrs. Jacob
Bright, Moncure D. Conway, Wm. Henry Channing,
Mrs. Rose, Stopford Brooke; speech at Prince's Hall;
Helen Taylor, Jane Cobden and others; speech at St.
James Hall; Mrs. Mellen's Fourth of July reception;
Canon Wilberforce, Sarah Bernhardt; Edinburgh;
Elizabeth Pease Nichol, Priscilla Bright McLaren,
Professor Blackie, Dr. Jex-Blake; home of Harriet
Martineau; Dublin; Isabella M. S. Tod and others; trip
through Ireland; characteristic descriptions; John
Bright, Hannah Ford, home of the Brontës; Henrietta
Müller, Margaret Bright Lucas, Frances Power Cobbe,
Millicent Garrett Fawcett, Mrs. Peter Taylor; home
again.
CHAPTER XXXIII.
Congressional Hearings—Visit to New Orleans. (1884-
1885.)581-6032
Welcome Home from Rochester Democrat and
Chronicle, N. Y. Evening Telegram, Cleveland Leader;
unkind comment Cincinnati Times-Star; dislike of
interviewing Congressmen shown by letter to Wm. D.
Kelley; Warren Keifer in favor of Woman Suffrage;
opposition of Reagan, of Texas; members for and
against Special Committee; Douglass marriage; letters
to young workers; death of Wendell Phillips; Bishop
Simpson on Woman Suffrage; fine speech before
Congressional Committee; Thomas B. Reed's report;
letter from Senator Palmer; Miss Anthony on Suffrage
Bill in Parliament; attitude of Presidential candidates;opposes resolution denouncing dogmas and creeds;
attack of Rev. W. W. Patton; Senator Palmer's
speech; trip to New Orleans; tribute of Picayune; Eddy
legacy received; working on History; Miss Anthony's
dislike of literary labor; Mrs. Stanton's seventieth
birthday; letter from Harriet Stanton Blatch.
CHAPTER XXXIV.
Many Trips—First Vote on Sixteenth Amendment.
(1886-1887.)605-626
Miss Anthony's persistence with members of
Congress; Eighteenth Washington Convention;
committee reports; canvass of the State of Kansas;
Municipal Suffrage Bill passed by Legislature;
speaking throughout Wisconsin; advice as to Church
for holding convention; History of Woman Suffrage
and valuable work accomplished by it; opinions of
Mary L. Booth, Sarah B. Cooper and others;
Nineteenth Annual Convention; Senator Blair's bill for
Woman Suffrage; Senators Brown and Vest in
opposition; Senators Dolph and Blair in favor;
remonstrance from Boston; the Vote; women incensed
at Ingalls; letter to Frances Willard on Prohibition
Party; letter to Olympia Brown against bringing suit
under school suffrage law; scores Senator Ingalls in
Kansas; canvass of Indiana.
CHAPTER XXXV.
Union of Associations—International Council.
(1888.)627-645
American Association proposes Union; negotiations to
that end; plea for Mrs. Stanton's election as president;Union completed; International Council of Women;
magnitude of preparations; Miss Anthony's idea of a
sermon; letter of Douglass on First Woman's Rights
Convention; letter of Maria Mitchell; efforts to secure
Mrs. Stanton's presence; comment of Baltimore Sun
and N. Y. World; Frances Willard's speech and letter
to Union Signal; National and International Councils
formed; at Central Music Hall, Chicago; letter urging
women to go to National Political conventions; open
letter to General Harrison; Republican "free ballot"
plank does not include Women; dislike of "red tape;"
speech at Columbus W. C. T. U. celebration not well
received.
CHAPTER XXXVI.
Conventions from Washington to South Dakota.
(1889.)647-661
Twenty-first Washington Convention; address before
Unity Club, Cincinnati; death of niece Susie B.; letters
on Death; newspaper comment on Dress; at Seidl
Club on Coney Island and "Broadbrim's" account; a
round of lectures and conventions; letter of Harriet
Hosmer; canvass of South Dakota; Miss Anthony
outlines plan of campaign; nephew D. R. describes
speech at Ann Arbor; "Andrew Jackson-like
responsibility"; work for South Dakota; description in
Washington Star.
CHAPTER XXXVII.
At the End of Seventy Years. (1890.)663-678
Consternation at idea of selling tickets for Birthday
banquet; description of banquet by Washington Starand N. Y. Sun; speeches of Rev. F. W. Hinckley, Hon.
J. A. Pickler, Mrs. Stanton and Miss Anthony;
congratulatory letters from distinguished people;
eloquent tributes from Boston Traveller and Rochester
Democrat and Chronicle; first Convention of United
Associations; money for South Dakota; in Washington
society; letter on pre-natal influence.
CHAPTER XXXVIII.
The South Dakota Campaign. (1890.)679-696
Appeals from South Dakota; Miss Anthony lays down
the law regarding National funds; pledges of Farmers'
Alliance leaders; contributions to campaign; goes to
South Dakota; Farmers' Alliance and Knights of Labor
form new party and repudiate pledges for Woman
Suffrage; insults at Democratic Convention;
Republican Convention has room for Indian men but
none for white women; Miss Anthony's cheerful letters;
hardships of campaign; Mrs. Howell's description of
meetings at Madison; Rev. Anna Shaw's account of
crying babies and drunken man; Mrs. Chapman Catt's
summing-up of situation; statistics of Defeat; Miss
Anthony endorsed by State W. C. T. U. and Suffrage
Associations.
CHAPTER XXXIX.
Wyoming—Miss Anthony Goes to Housekeeping.
(1890-1891.)697-716
Debate in Congress on admission of Wyoming; first
majority report from House Committee in favor of
Sixteenth Amendment; Wimodaughsis; in Boston;
letter of sympathy from Lucy Stone; first triennial