The Philippine Islands, 1493-1898 — Volume 09 of 55 - 1593-1597 - Explorations by Early Navigators, Descriptions of the Islands and Their Peoples, Their History and Records of the Catholic Missions, as Related in Contemporaneous Books and Manuscripts, Showing the Political, Economic, Commercial and Religious Conditions of Those Islands from Their Earliest Relations with European Nations to the Close of the Nineteenth Century
103 Pages
English
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The Philippine Islands, 1493-1898 — Volume 09 of 55 - 1593-1597 - Explorations by Early Navigators, Descriptions of the Islands and Their Peoples, Their History and Records of the Catholic Missions, as Related in Contemporaneous Books and Manuscripts, Showing the Political, Economic, Commercial and Religious Conditions of Those Islands from Their Earliest Relations with European Nations to the Close of the Nineteenth Century

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103 Pages
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Project Gutenberg's The Philippine Islands, 1493-1898, by E. H. Blair This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.net Title: The Philippine Islands, 1493-1898 Volume IX, 1593-1597 Author: E. H. Blair Release Date: December 6, 2004 [EBook #14265] Language: English Character set encoding: ISO-8859-1 *** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK THE PHILIPPINE ISLANDS, 1493-1898 *** Produced by Jeroen Hellingman and the PG Distributed Proofreaders Team The Philippine Islands, 1493–1898 Explorations by early navigators, descriptions of the islands and their peoples, their history and records of the catholic missions, as related in contemporaneous books and manuscripts, showing the political, economic, commercial and religious conditions of those islands from their earliest relations with European nations to the close of the nineteenth century Volume IX, 1593–1597 Edited and annotated by Emma Helen Blair and James Alexander Robertson with historical introduction and additional notes by Edward Gaylord Bourne. Page 1 Contents of Volume IX Preface 9 Documents of 1593 The second embassy to Japan. G. P. Dasmariñas, and others; April–May. ... 23 Two letters to Felipe II. G. P. Dasmariñas; Manila, June 20. ... 58 Memorandum of troops required in the Philippines. [Unsigned and undated; 1593?]. ... 74 Letter to the king of Camboja. G. P. Dasmariñas; Manila, September 27. ... 76 Documents of 1594 List of Philippine villages reduced by the Spaniards. [Unsigned and undated; 1594?]. ... 81 Letter to king of Canboja. Luis Perez Dasmariñas; Manila, February 8. ... 86 Investigation of the hospital. Hernando de los Ríos, and others; Manila, February-April. ... 88 Report concerning the Filipinas Islands, and other papers. Francisco de Ortega, O.S.A.; [1594]. ... 95 Decree for despatch of missionaries. Felipe II; Aranjuez, April 27. ... 120 Reply to the Japanese emperor's letter. L.P. Dasmariñas, and others; Manila, April 22—28 ... 122 Three letters to Felipe II. L.P. Dasmariñas; Manila, June 15—23 ... 137 Documents of 1595 Letter to Felipe II. Pedro Gongalez de Carbajal; [1595?] ... 147 Formation of new dioceses. Felipe II; Madrid, June 17 ... 150 Letter to Felipe II. Antonio de Morga; Manila, June 25 ... 154 Expedition to Camboja. Gregorio da Cruz, and others; August 1—3 ... 161 Instructions to Figueroa. L.P. Dasmariñas; Manila, November 13—16 ... 181 The Audiencia of Manila reëstablished . Felipe II; El Pardo, November 26 ... 189 Letter to Felipe II. L.P. Dasmariñas; Manila, December 6 ... 193 Documents of 1596 Coat-of-arms of the city of Manila . Felipe II; Aranjuez, March 20 ... 211 Decree regarding the bishopric of Nueva Segovia. Felipe II; Ateca, May 15 ... 216 Instructions for Governor Tello. Felipe II; Toledo, May 25 ... 218 Letter to Felipe II. L.P. Dasmariñas; Manila, June 30 ... 259 Letter to Felipe II. Antonio de Morga; Manila, July 6 ... 263 Letter to Felipe II. Francisco Tello; Manila, July 17 ... 274 Documents of 1597 Pacification of Mindanao. Juan de Ronquillo; Tanpaca, May 10 ... 281 Memorial on navigation and conquest. Hernando de los Rios; Manila, June 27 ... 299 Letter to Felipe II. L.P. Dasmariñas; Manila, June 28 ... 315 Bibliographical Data ... 327 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Illustrations Autograph signature of Gomez Perez Dasmariñas, governor of the Philippine Islands; photographic facsimile from MS. in Archivo general de Indias, Sevilla ... 69 Coat-of-arms of the city of Manila (two representations); photographic facsimiles from original MSS. (dated 1683 and 1748) in Archivo general de Indias, Sevilla ... 213 Map of islands of Luzón and Hermosa, with part of China; photographic facsimile of MS. map by Hernando de los Rios Coronel (dated June 27, 1597), in Archivo general de Indias, Sevilla ... 305 Page 5 Preface The events related in the present volume (1593–97) conclude the first quarter-century of the history of Manila as a Spanish settlement. That city, although small, is gaining in importance and prosperity; it is fairly well fortified, and its public institutions are increasing; it is now the seat of an archbishop, and three dioceses are formed to be under his care. Restless spirits among the Spaniards desire to conquer neighboring lands; this is partially accomplished in Mindanao, but that island proves to be of little value. An expedition is sent nominally in aid of Camboja against Siam, but is unsuccessful. Meanwhile, the Spaniards are not free from danger: the emperor of Japan is apparently plotting their subjection; and the natives of the islands, although nominally pacified, are inclined to rebel. The increasing numbers of the Chinese in the islands render them dangerous, and various restrictions are imposed upon them. Governor Dasmariñas, slain by his Chinese oarsmen, is succeeded pro tempore by his son Luis Pérez; but the latter is too young for so important a post, and the king reestablishes the Audiencia at Manila. Its president, Francisco Tello, is also governor of the islands. In 1593 another ambassador arrives at Manila from the Japanese ruler Hideyoshi. This is Faranda, who furnishes a full account of the manner in which Fray Juan Cobos had been received in Japan the year before, and of his own appointment from the emperor as envoy to the Spaniards, on which errand he departed with Cobos. The latter perished by shipwreck, Faranda arriving safely at Manila. He professes a desire for peace and friendship between the Japanese and Spaniards, instead of the subjection of the latter; and asks that Franciscan missionaries be sent to his country. Since he brings no credentials, except letters from Fray Cobos, the governor orders an official inquiry into the whole matter, and examines witnesses about it. Juan de Solis, a Spanish captain who happened to be in Japan when Fray Cobos arrived there, thinks that the emperor is sincere in asking only the friendship of the Castilians. Solis relates the events of the father's stay there, confirming the account given by Faranda. A similar deposition is made by Antonio Lopez, the Chinese convert who comes with Faranda. But there follows a long account, apparently obtained from conversations held with this Antonio and several others, of intrigues and plots among the Japanese to subdue the Philippines, as they have done with Corea. The Spaniards are warned against the Chinese who are in Manila. Much of this is apparently the gossip of the Parián; but it affords curious side-lights on the relations between the Japanese, Chinese, and Spaniards. A letter from Dasmariñas to the Japanese emperor (May 20, 1593) announces his despatch of another envoy, the Franciscan priest Pedro Baptista. Governor Dasmariñas writes (June 20, 1593) to King Felipe, reporting the present state of affairs in he