The Philippine Islands, 1493-1898 — Volume 13 of 55 - 1604-1605 - Explorations by Early Navigators, Descriptions of the Islands and Their Peoples, Their History and Records of The Catholic Missions, As Related in Contemporaneous Books and Manuscripts, Showing the Political, Economic, Commercial and Religious Conditions of Those Islands from Their Earliest Relations with European Nations to the Close of the Nineteenth Century

The Philippine Islands, 1493-1898 — Volume 13 of 55 - 1604-1605 - Explorations by Early Navigators, Descriptions of the Islands and Their Peoples, Their History and Records of The Catholic Missions, As Related in Contemporaneous Books and Manuscripts, Showing the Political, Economic, Commercial and Religious Conditions of Those Islands from Their Earliest Relations with European Nations to the Close of the Nineteenth Century

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The Project Gutenberg EBook of The Philippine Islands, 1493-1898, Ed. by Blair and RobertsonThis eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it,give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online atwww.gutenberg.netTitle: The Philippine Islands, 1493-1898, Volume XIII., 1604-1605Author: Ed. by Blair and RobertsonRelease Date: February 26, 2005 [EBook #15184]Language: English*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK THE PHILIPPINE ISLANDS, 1493-1898, ***Produced by Jeroen Hellingman and the PG Distributed Proofreaders TeamThe Philippine Islands, 1493-1898 Explorations by early navigators, descriptions of the islands and their peoples, their history and records of the catholic missions, as related in contemporaneous books and manuscripts, showing the political, economic, commercial and religious conditions of those islands from their earliest relations with European nations to the close of the nineteenth century,Volume XIII, 1604-1605 Edited and annotated by Emma Helen Blair and James Alexander Robertson with historical introduction and additional notes by Edward Gaylord Bourne.CONTENTS OF VOLUME XIII Preface 9 Relación de las Islas Filipinas (concluded) Pedro Chirino, S.J.; Roma, 1604 2 Documents of 1604 Letters to Felipe III. Pedro de Acuña; ...

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The Project Gutenberg EBook of The Philippine
Islands, 1493-1898, Ed. by Blair and Robertson
This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at
no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever.
You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the
terms of the Project Gutenberg License included
with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.net
Title: The Philippine Islands, 1493-1898, Volume
XIII., 1604-1605
Author: Ed. by Blair and Robertson
Release Date: February 26, 2005 [EBook #15184]
Language: English
*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG
EBOOK THE PHILIPPINE ISLANDS, 1493-1898,
***
Produced by Jeroen Hellingman and the PG
Distributed Proofreaders Team
The Philippine Islands, 1493-1898 Explorations by early navigators, descriptions of
the islands and
their peoples, their history and records of the
catholic missions,
as related in contemporaneous books and
manuscripts, showing the
political, economic, commercial and religious
conditions of those
islands from their earliest relations with European
nations to the
close of the nineteenth century,
Volume XIII, 1604-1605
Edited and annotated by Emma Helen Blair and
James Alexander Robertson
with historical introduction and additional notes by
Edward Gaylord
Bourne.CONTENTS OF
VOLUME XIII
Preface 9
Relación de las Islas Filipinas (concluded) Pedro
Chirino, S.J.;
Roma, 1604 2
Documents of 1604
Letters to Felipe III. Pedro de Acuña;
Manila, July 15
and 19 221
Decrees regarding religious orders. Felipe
III, and others;
Valladolid, February-July 246
Grant to the Jesuit seminary at Cebú.
Pedro Chirino;
[undated; 1604?] 251
Decree regulating commerce with Nueva
España. Felipe III;
Valladolid, December 31 256
Documents of 1605
Complaints against the Chinese. Miguel de
Benavides,
and others; Manila, February 3-9 271
Letter from a Chinese official to Acuña.
Chincheo, March 287
Letters from Augustinian friars to Felipe III.
Estevan
Carillo, and others; Manila, May 4-June 20
292
Letter to Felipe III. Antonio de Ribera
Maldonado; Manila,
June 28 307
Bibliographical Data 317ILLUSTRATIONS
Autograph signature of Pedro Chirino, S.J.;
photographic facsimile
from MS. in Archivo general de Indias, Sevilla
215
Autograph signatures of Pedro de Acuña and
members of the
Audiencia; photographic facsimile from MS. in
Archivo general de
Indias, Sevilla 243PREFACE
The larger part of the present volume is occupied
with the Relacion of the Jesuit Chirino, begun in
Vol. XII, and here concluded. In this work is
recorded the progress of the Jesuit missions up to
the year 1602, by which time they have been
established not only in Luzón and Cebú, but in
Bohol, Leyte, Negros, Samar, and northern
Mindanao. The arrival of the visitor García in 1599
results in new vigor and more thorough
organization in the missions, and the numbers of
those baptized in each rapidly increase. The
missionaries are able to uproot idolatry in many
places, and greatly check its practice in others.
Everywhere they introduce, with great acceptance
and edification among the natives, the practice of
flagellation—"the procession of blood." Religious
confraternities are formed among the converts,
greatly aiding the labors of the fathers; and the
latter open schools for boys, among both the
Spaniards and the Indians. In time of pestilence
they minister to the sick and the dying; and they
gain great influence among all classes. They
secure the good-will of hostile natives, quell a
threatened revolt among those of Leyte, and
reclaim certain outlaws and bandits. The Spaniards
also receive their ministrations, especially in
Manila; the fathers adjust dissensions and family
quarrels, and reform several dissolute persons.
The college at Manila prospers, and enlarges itscurriculum. The labors of the Jesuits effect certain
important changes in social conditions among the
natives. Usury, unjust enslavement, and polygamy
are greatly lessened, and sometimes entirely
abolished, among the Indians in the mission
districts; and most notable of these results, the
fathers have much success in gathering not only
their own converts, but even many of the wild and
savage mountaineers, into villages under their
personal care and supervision.
A new monastic order, the Augustinian Recollects,
is permitted to send missionaries to the islands.
Little of importance occurs there in 1604; but
among the Spaniards there is much fear of an
invasion by the Chinese, in revenge for the late
slaughter of their countrymen in Luzón. Yet the
cupidity or laxity of the officials has permitted the
number of Chinese resident in the islands to
increase beyond proper limits; and the archbishop
of Manila endeavors to secure strict enforcement
of the laws against this dangerous immigration.
The leading officials of the Augustinian order
complain (1605) of their provincial as unscrupulous
and overbearing, and ask for relief and the suitable
adjustment of the affairs of their province.
Chirino's narrative of the Jesuit missions (here
concluded) narrates events from 1598 onward. In
June of that year Father Vera goes to obtain more
missionaries from Europe. In Mexico he meets
orders from the general of the Jesuit order that
Diego García shall go with a reënforcement of
laborers to the Philippines. In Manila, during thatyear, the Jesuits meet much success in their
ministries—especially in the confessional, in public
preaching, and in various benevolent works. They
also accomplish much in private affairs, reconciling
enemies, preventing lawsuits, and checking
licentious conduct. The annals continue with the
progress of the Antipolo mission during 1598. The
mountain-dwellers continue to come to the mission,
of whom many are baptized—among these some
of the heathen priests. Among the converts are
formed confraternities which most efficiently aid the
labors of the missionaries. The people have given
up their pagan practices, and display great piety
and devotion as Christians.
At Cebú the bishop has greatly favored the Jesuits,
who have opened a school for his clergy and the
sons of some citizens. Their labors are chiefly
among the Visayan natives and the Chinese, and
meet much success. The writer relates some
instances of especial virtue and piety among these
converts; there, as in missions elsewhere, the
women are distinguished in those respects. No less
important are the labors of the Jesuits among the
Spaniards of Cebú, among whom they exercise
great influence, even the bishop depending upon
their advice; and they often preach in the
cathedral. The bishop, "in imitation of Manila,"
introduces the practice of flagellation at Lent, and
himself leads the "procession of blood."
In the island of Bohol the infant church continues to
grow. The converts have entirely abandoned
idolatry; and certain miraculous cures have kindledin them a most fervent piety. In Butúan (in northern
Mindanao) "Christianity is in a flourishing
condition," according to Father Ledesma, whose
letters are cited. Conversions are steadily
increasing: and several chiefs are to be baptized
soon, although the most noted leader, Silongan, is
not yet cured of his polygamous inclinations. He is,
however, most friendly to the fathers, and protects
them in certain dangers. In Alangalang, Tomás de
Montoya (an American Indian who has gone to the
islands) has resumed the work dropped at the
death of Cosme de Flores; he relates some
instances of piety among his converts, and of
punishment visited on the impenitent. At Ogmuc
much caution had been exercised in conferring
baptism, and those who have received it show
most edifying piety. In Holy Week occurs a
procession in which "the most pleasing and
touching sight was to see all the children
disciplining themselves with scourges which they
themselves had made for that day." The
missionaries adjust various family quarrels, and put
an end in the islands to the practices of usury and
unjust enslavement. Chirino here gives some
account of these evils, but adds that they are
abolished among all the christianized tribes in the
islands.
Good reports come from Carigara and Paloc; the
latter village is unusually prosperous because one
of the Jesuits has aided the people to construct
better dwellings. They have abandoned their idols,
and take pleasure in scourging themselves on
Fridays. At Dulac many baptisms have occurred,