The Philippine Islands, 1493-1898 — Volume 16 of 55  - 1609 - Explorations by Early Navigators, Descriptions of the Islands and Their Peoples, Their History and Records of the Catholic Missions, as Related in Contemporaneous Books and Manuscripts, Showing the Political, Economic, Commercial and Religious Conditions of Those Islands from Their Earliest Relations with European Nations to the Close of the Nineteenth Century
385 Pages
English

The Philippine Islands, 1493-1898 — Volume 16 of 55 - 1609 - Explorations by Early Navigators, Descriptions of the Islands and Their Peoples, Their History and Records of the Catholic Missions, as Related in Contemporaneous Books and Manuscripts, Showing the Political, Economic, Commercial and Religious Conditions of Those Islands from Their Earliest Relations with European Nations to the Close of the Nineteenth Century

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The Project Gutenberg EBook of The Philippine Islands, 1493-1898: Volume XVI, 1609, by H.E. BlairThis eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it,give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online atwww.gutenberg.netTitle: The Philippine Islands, 1493-1898: Volume XVI, 1609 Explorations By Early Navigators, Descriptions Of TheIslands And Their Peoples, Their History And Records Of The Catholic Missions, As Related In ContemporaneousBooks And Manuscripts, Showing The Political, Economic, Commercial And Religious Conditions Of Those IslandsFrom Their Earliest Relations With European Nations To The Close Of The Nineteenth CenturyAuthor: H.E. BlairRelease Date: February 24, 2005 [EBook #15157]Language: English*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK PHILIPPINE ISLANDS ***Produced by Jeroen Hellingman & the PG Distributed Proofreaders TeamThe Philippine Islands, 1493-1898 Explorations by early navigators, descriptions of the islands and their peoples, their history and records of the catholic missions, as related in contemporaneous books and manuscripts, showing the political, economic, commercial and religious conditions of those islands from their earliest relations with European nations to the close of the nineteenth century,Volume XVI, 1609 Edited and annotated by Emma Helen Blair and James ...

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The Project Gutenberg EBook of The Philippine
Islands, 1493-1898: Volume XVI, 1609, by H.E.
Blair
This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at
no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever.
You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the
terms of the Project Gutenberg License included
with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.net
Title: The Philippine Islands, 1493-1898: Volume
XVI, 1609 Explorations By Early Navigators,
Descriptions Of The Islands And Their Peoples,
Their History And Records Of The Catholic
Missions, As Related In Contemporaneous Books
And Manuscripts, Showing The Political, Economic,
Commercial And Religious Conditions Of Those
Islands From Their Earliest Relations With
European Nations To The Close Of The Nineteenth
Century
Author: H.E. Blair
Release Date: February 24, 2005 [EBook #15157]
Language: English
*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG
EBOOK PHILIPPINE ISLANDS ***Produced by Jeroen Hellingman & the PG
Distributed Proofreaders Team
The Philippine Islands, 1493-1898
Explorations by early navigators, descriptions of
the islands and
their peoples, their history and records of the
catholic missions,
as related in contemporaneous books and
manuscripts, showing the
political, economic, commercial and religious
conditions of those
islands from their earliest relations with European
nations to the
close of the nineteenth century,
Volume XVI, 1609
Edited and annotated by Emma Helen Blair and
James Alexander Robertson
with historical introduction and additional notes by
Edward Gaylord
Bourne.CONTENTS OF
VOLUME XVI
Preface
Sucesos de las Islas Filipinas (concluded).
Antonio de Morga;
Mexico, 1609.
Conqvista de las Islas Malvcas. Bartolomé
Leonardo de
Argensola; Madrid, 1609.
Bibliographical Data
Appendix: Customs of the Pampangas in their
lawsuits. Juan
de Plasencia, O.S.F.; [1589?]ILLUSTRATIONS
Title-page of Sucesos de las Islas Filipinas
(Mexici ad
Indos, 1609), another edition of Morga's work;
photographic
reproduction of the facsimile presented in
Zaragoza's edition
(Madrid, 1887); from copy in possession of
Edward E. Ayer,
Chicago, which is supposed to be the only copy
extant of
Zaragoza's edition.
View of corcoa (the vessel known as "caracoa");
photographic
facsimile of engraving in John Stevens's
Collection of Voyages
and Travels (London, 1711), i.—in Argensola's
"Discovery
and conquest of the Molucco and Philippine
Islands," p. 61;
from copy in library of Wisconsin Historical
Society.
Autograph signature of Antonio de Morga;
photographic facsimile from MS. in Archivo general de Indias, Sevilla.
Title-page of Conqvista de las Islas Malvcas, by
Bartolome
Leonardo de Argensola (Madrid, 1609);
photographic facsimile,
from copy in library of Harvard University.
PREFACE
In the present volume is concluded the notable
work by Morga, Sucesos de las Islas Filipinas,
which was begun in Vol. XV. The reader is referred
to the preface of that volume for some account of
the book, and of the manner in which it is
presented in this series. Another book notable in
the history of the Philippines is that of Argensola,
Conqvista de las Islas Molvcas (Madrid, 1609). In
presenting here this work, the Editors follow the
plan which proves to be more or less necessary
with many of the printed early histories of the
islands—that of translating in full only such parts of
the book as relate directly to the Philippines, and
are of especial value or importance; and furnishing
a brief synopsis of all matter omitted, in order that
the reader may survey the book as a whole, andunderstand the relations and connections of the
parts that are presented in full with those that are
synopsized. This method is rendered necessary by
the limitations of this series in regard to space,
especially as most of the old histories—as
Aduarte's, San Agustin's, and La Concepción's—
are exceedingly voluminous; and, moreover,
devote much space to the affairs of Japan, China,
and other countries outside the Philippines. All
matter of this sort must of course, be omitted; and
much of what remains is more useful for
annotations, or is relatively unimportant for
publication. The Editors consider, as do many
other persons interested in this series, that it is
desirable to present (especially in the early period
of the Philippine history) the larger part of these
documents from the manuscript and hitherto
unpublished material largely conserved in foreign
archives; and that the needs of students and
investigators will thus be better served than by
occupying the valuable and limited space of this
series with complete translations of books which
can be found in large American libraries. The
location of all these will be noted, so far as is
possible, in the volume devoted to bibliographical
information at the end of this series; meanwhile the
needs of most readers will be suitably met by the
synopses of omitted matter and the free use of
such works as those of La Concepción and San
Antonio in annotations. The Editors purpose to
present a few of these histories, especially in the
earlier period, in very full form, so far as they cover
Philippine history; for these are original sources,
from which later writers obtained much of theirmaterial. These methods render this series
unusually rich in valuable historical material, all
carefully selected, and much of it greatly
condensed by the excision of extraneous,
irrelevant, and unimportant matter. The parts thus
omitted and synopsized will be, as heretofore,
indicated by enclosing the synopses in brackets.
Continuing his narrative, Morga describes his
voyage to Mexico, whither he goes (1603) to be a
member of the Audiencia there. He then relates
the events of the Chinese uprising in Luzón in that
year, which has been fully described in previous
volumes of this series; and his picturesque
although plain narrative casts new light upon that
episode. Many Spaniards in Manila are so alarmed
by this danger that they remove, with all their
households and property, to Nueva España; but
one of the ships carrying them is lost at sea, and
the other is compelled, after great injury and loss,
to return to Manila—a serious calamity for the
colony there. The governor does his best to fortify
the city, and reënforcements and supplies are
provided for him from Nueva España. Bishop
Benavides dies (1605). Friars from the islands go
to Japan, but the emperor of that country is
offended at their preaching, and advises Acuña to
restrain them. In the summer of 1605 arrive
supplies and men from Nueva España, and Acuña
proceeds with his preparations for the expedition
against the Dutch in the Moluccas. In the following
spring he sets out on this enterprise, conducting itin person; Morga describes this naval campaign in
detail. Ternate is captured by the Spaniards
without bombardment, and with little loss to
themselves. The fugitive king of the island is
persuaded to surrender to the Spaniards and
become a vassal of Felipe. Several other petty
rulers follow his example and promise not to allow
the Dutch to engage in the clove trade. Acuña
builds a new fort there, and another in Tidore,
leaving Juan de Esquivel as governor of the
Moluccas, with a garrison and several vessels far
their defense, and carrying to Manila the king of
Ternate and many of his nobles, as hostages.
During Acuña's absence a mutiny occurs among
the Japanese near Manila, which is quelled mainly
by the influence of the friars. The governor dies,
apparently from poison, soon after his return to
Manila. The trade of the islands is injured by the
restrictions laid upon it by the home government;
and the reduction of Ternate has not sufficed to
restrain the Moro pirates. The natives of the
Moluccas are uneasy and rebellious, especially as
they have a prospect of aid from the Dutch, who
are endeavoring to regain their lost possessions
there. Morga cites a letter from a Spanish officer at
La Palma, recounting the purpose and outcome of
van Noordt's expedition to the Indian archipelago.
The historical part of Morga's account ends here;
and the final chapter is devoted to a description of
the islands and their people, the customs and
religious beliefs of the natives, and the condition at
that time of the Spanish colony and the city of
Manila. He describes the principal islands of thePhilippine group, beginning with Luzón; the various
races of inhabitants—Moros, Negritos, and
Visayans: their mode of dress, their occupations
and industries, their habits of life; their weapons,
their ships and boats; the trees and fruits of the
islands; the animals and birds, both wild and tame;
the reptiles, fishes, and other creatures; and
various plants. Among these is the buyo (or betel);
the habit of chewing it has become universal
among the Spaniards, of all classes, and poison is
often administered through its medium. Various
means and methods of poisoning are described, as
well as some antidotes therefor. Some account is
given of the gold mines and pearl fisheries, and of
other products of the country which form articles of
commerce. Morga describes the two great lakes of
Luzón (Bombon and Bai), Manila and its harbor
and approaches, and other principal ports, with
some neighboring islands; and gives some account
of the Visayan people and the larger islands
inhabited by them, and of the tides in the
archipelago. Then follows an interesting and
detailed account of the Filipino peoples, their
language, customs, beliefs, etc. The language
used in Luzón and other northern islands is
different from that of the Visayas; but all the
natives write, expressing themselves fluently and
correctly, and using a simple alphabet which
resembles the Arabic. Their houses, and their
mode of life therein, arc fully described; also their
government, social organization, and
administration of justice. The classes and status of
slaves, and the causes of enslavement are
recounted. Their customs in marriages and