The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques and Discoveries of the English Nation — Volume 11
669 Pages
English
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The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques and Discoveries of the English Nation — Volume 11

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669 Pages
English

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The Project Gutenberg eBook, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of The English Nation,Vol. 11, by Richard Hakluyt, Edited by Edmund GoldsmidThis eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it,give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online atwww.gutenberg.netTitle: The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of The English Nation, Vol. 11Author: Richard HakluytRelease Date: June 23, 2004 [eBook #12693]Language: English, Latin, Spanish, and Italian***START OF THE PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK THE PRINCIPAL NAVIGATIONS, VOYAGES, TRAFFIQUES,AND DISCOVERIES OF THE ENGLISH NATION, VOL. 11***E-text prepared by Karl Hagen and the Project Gutenberg Online Distributed Proofreading Team from imagesgenerously made available by the Canadian Institute for Historical Microreproductions** Transcriber's Notes **The printed edition from which this e-text has been produced retains the spelling and abbreviations of Hakluyt's 16th-century original. In this version, the spelling has been retained, but the following manuscript abbreviations have beensilently expanded:- vowels with macrons = vowel + 'n' or 'm' - q; = -que (in the Latin) - y'e = the; y't = that; w't = withThis edition contains footnotes and two types of sidenotes. Most footnotes are added by the editor. They follow modern(19th-century) ...

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The Project Gutenberg eBook, The Principal
Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries
of The English Nation, Vol. 11, by Richard Hakluyt,
Edited by Edmund Goldsmid
This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at
no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever.
You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the
terms of the Project Gutenberg License included
with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.net
Title: The Principal Navigations, Voyages,
Traffiques, and Discoveries of The English Nation,
Vol. 11
Author: Richard Hakluyt
Release Date: June 23, 2004 [eBook #12693]
Language: English, Latin, Spanish, and Italian
***START OF THE PROJECT GUTENBERG
EBOOK THE PRINCIPAL NAVIGATIONS,
VOYAGES, TRAFFIQUES, AND DISCOVERIES
OF THE ENGLISH NATION, VOL. 11***
E-text prepared by Karl Hagen and the Project
Gutenberg Online Distributed Proofreading Teamfrom images generously made available by the
Canadian Institute for Historical Microreproductions
** Transcriber's Notes **
The printed edition from which this e-text has been
produced retains the spelling and abbreviations of
Hakluyt's 16th-century original. In this version, the
spelling has been retained, but the following
manuscript abbreviations have been silently
expanded:
- vowels with macrons = vowel + 'n' or 'm' - q; = -
que (in the Latin) - y'e = the; y't = that; w't = with
This edition contains footnotes and two types of
sidenotes. Most footnotes are added by the editor.
They follow modern (19th-century) spelling
conventions. Those that don't are Hakluyt's (and
are not always systematically marked as such by
the editor). The sidenotes are Hakluyt's own.
Summarizing sidenotes are labelled [Sidenote: ]
and placed before the sentence to which they
apply. Sidenotes that are keyed with a symbol are
labeled [Marginal note: ] and placed at the point of
the symbol, except in poetry, where they are
placed at a convenient point. Additional notes on
corrections, etc. are signed 'KTH'
** End Transcriber's Notes **THE PRINCIPAL
NAVIGATIONS,
VOYAGES,
TRAFFIQUES AND
DISCOVERIES OF THE
ENGLISH NATION,
VOLUME XI
AFRICA
Collected by
RICHARD HAKLUYT, PREACHER.
AND
Edited by
EDMUND GOLDSMID, F.R.H.S.Nauigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoueries
OF THE
ENGLISH NATION IN AFRICA.
* * * * *
The voyage of Henrie Eatle of Derbie, after Duke
of Hereford, and lastly
Henry the fourth King of England, to Tunis in
Barbarie, with an army of
Englishmen mitten by Polidore Virgill. pag. 1389.
Franci interim per inducias nacti ocium, ac simul
Genuensium precibus defatigati, bellum in Afros,
qui omnem oram insulásque Italiae latiocinijs
infestas reddebant, suscipiunt. Richardus quoque
rex Angliæ rogatus auxilium, mittit Henricum
comitem Derbiensem cum electa Anglicæ pubis
manu ad id bellum faciendum. Igitur Franci
Anglíque viribus et animis consociatis in Africam
traijciunt, qui vbi littus attigere, eatenus à Barbaris
descensione prohibiti sunt, quoad Anglorum
sagittariorum virtute factum est, vt aditus pateret:
in terram egressi recta Tunetam vrbem regiam
petunt, ac obsident. Barbari timore affecti de pacead eos legates mittunt, quam nostris dare placuit,
vt soluta certa pecuniae summa ab omni deinceps
Italiae, Galliaeque ora mamis abstinerent. Ita
peractis rebus post paucos menses, quàm eo itum
erat, domum repediatum est.
The same in English.
The French in the meane season hauing gotten
some leasure by meanes of their truce, and being
sollicited and vrged by the intreaties of the Genuois
vndertooke to wage warre against the Moores, who
robbed and spoyled all the coasts of Italy, and of
the Ilandes adiacent. Likewise Richard the second,
king of England, being sued vnto for ayde, sent
Henry the Earle of Derbie with a choice armie of
English souldiers vnto the same warfare.
Wherefore the English and French, with forces and
mindes vnited, sayled ouer into Africa, who when
they approached vnto the shore were repelled by
the Barbarians from landing, vntill such time as
they had passage made them by the valour of the
English archers. Thus hauing landed their forces,
they foorthwith marched vnto the royall citie of
Tunis, and besieged it. Whereat the Barbarians
being dismayed, sent Ambassadours vnto our
Christian Chieftaines to treat of peace, which our
men graunted vnto them, vpon condition that they
should pay a certaine summe of money, and that
they should from thencefoorth abstaine from
piracies vpon all the coasts of Italy and France.
And so hauing dispatched their businesse, within a
fewe moneths after their departure they returnedhome.
This Historie is somewhat otherwise recorded by
Froysard and Holenshed in manner following, pag
473.
In the thirteenth yeere of the reigne of King
Richard the second, the Christians tooke in hand a
iourney against the Saracens of Barbarie through
sute of the Genouois, so that there went a great
number of Lords, Knights, and Gentlemen of
France and England, the Duke of Burbon being
their Generall. Out of England there went Iohn de
Beaufort bastarde sonne to the Duke of Lancaster
(as Froysard hath noted) also Sir Iohn Russell, Sir
Iohn Butler, Sir Iohn Harecourt and others. They
set forwarde in the latter ende of the thirteenth
yeere of the Kings reigne, and came to Genoa,
where they remayned not verie long, but that the
gallies and other vessels of the Genouois were
ready to passe them ouer into Barbarie. And so
about midsomer in the begining of the foureteenth
yere of this kings reigne the whole army being
embarked, sailed forth to the coast of Barbary,
where neere to the city of Africa they landed:
[Sidenote: The Chronicles of Genoa] at which
instant the English archers (as the Chronicles of
Genoa write) stood all the company in good stead
with their long bowes, beating backe the enemies
from the shore, which came downe to resist their
landing. After they had got to land, they inuironed
the city of Africa (called by the Moores Mahdia)
with a strong siege: but at length, constrained withthe intemperancy of the scalding ayre in that hot
countrey, breeding in the army sundry diseases,
they fell to a composition vpon certaine articles to
be performed in the behalfe of the Saracens: and
so 61 dayes after their arriuall there they tooke the
seas againe, and returned home, as in the
histories of France and Genoa is likewise
expressed. Where, by Polidore Virgil it may seeme,
that the lord Henry of Lancaster earle of Derbie
should be generall of the English men, that (as
before you heard) went into Barbary with the
French men and Genouois.
* * * * *
The memorable victories in diuers parts of Italie of
Iohn Hawkwood English man in the reigne of
Richard the second, briefly recorded by M.
Camden.
Ad alteram ripam fluuij Colne oppositus est Sibble
Heningham, locus natalis, vt accepi, Ioannis
Hawkwoodi (Itali Aucuthum corruptè vocant) quem
illi tantopere ob virtutem militarem suspexerunt, vt
Senatus Florentinus propter insignia merita
equestri statua et tumuli honore in eximiæ
fortitudinis, fideíque testimonium ornauit. Res eius
gestas Itali pleno ore prædicant; Et Paulus Iouius
in elogijs celebrat: sat mihi sit Iulij Feroldi
tetrastichon adijcere.
Hawkoode Angloram decus, et decus addite genti
Italicæ, Italico presidiúmque solo,
Vt tumuli quondam Florentia, sic simulachri Virtutem Ionius donat honore tuam.
William Thomas in his Historie of the common
wealthes of Italy, maketh honorable mention of him
twise, to wit, in the commonwealth of Florentia and
Ferrara.
* * * * *
The Epitaph of the valiant Esquire M. Peter Read
in the south Ile of Saint Peters Church in the citie
of Norwich, which was knighted by Charles the fift
at the winning of Tunis in the yeere of our Lord
1538.
Here vnder lieth the corpes of Peter Reade
Esquire, who hath worthily serued, not onely his
Prince and Countrey, but also the Emperour
Charles the fift, both at his conquest of Barbarie,
and at his siege at Tunis, and also in other places.
Who had giuen him by the sayd Emperour for his
valiant deedes the order of Barbary. Who dyed the
29 day of December, in the yeere of our Lord God
1566.
* * * * *
The voyage of Sir Thomas Chaloner to Alger with
Charles the fift 1541, drawen out of his booke De
Republica instauranda.
Thomas Chalonerus patria Londinensis, studio
Cantabrigensis, educatione aulicus, religione pius,
veréque Christianus fuit. Itaque cum iuuenilem
ætatem, mentémque suam humanioribus studijsroborasset, Domino Henrico Kneuetto à
potentissimo rege Henrico eius nominis octauo ad
Carolum quintum imperatorem transmisso legato,
vnà cum illo profectus est, tanquam familiaris
amicus, vel eidem, à consilijs. Quo quidem
tempore Carolo quinto nauali certamine à Genua et
Corsica in Algyram in Africa contra Turcas classem
soluente ac hostiliter proficiscente, ornatissimo illo
Kneuetto legato regis, Thoma Chalonero, Henrico
Knolleo, et Henrico Isamo, illustribus viris eundem
in illa expeditione suapte sponte sequentibus,
paritérque militantibus, mirifice vitam suam
Chalonerus tutatus est. Nam triremi illa, in qua
fuerat, vel scopulis allisa, vel grauissimis pro cellis
conquassata, naufragus cum se diù natatu
defendisset, deficientibus viribus, brachijs
manibusque languidis ac quasi eneruatis, prehensa
dentibus cum maxima difficultate rudenti, quæ ex
altera triremi iam propinqua tum fuerat eiecta, non
sine dentium aliquorum iactura sese tandem
recuperauit, ac domum integer relapsus est.
The same in English.
Thomas Chaloner was by birth a Londiner, by
studie a Cantabrigian, by education a Courtier, by
religion a deuout and true Christian. Therefore
after he had confirmed his youth and minde in the
studies of good learning, when Sir Henry Kneuet
was sent ambassadour from the mighty Prince
Henry the 8. to the Emperour Charles the fift, he
went with him as his familiar friend, or as one of his
Councell. At which time the said Charles the 5.