The Son of Monte-Cristo

The Son of Monte-Cristo

-

English
259 Pages
Read
Download
Downloading requires you to have access to the YouScribe library
Learn all about the services we offer

Description

! " #$ % " & ! ! ! # # ' ( ' ) * ' ( + ,--+ . /,0,102 ' ! ' 3 4&++56&1 777 () 48 93 )4 : ; ) 44> #% !%# ! " # ! " $ %& ' ' ( )' & *+, '$ , - $ .

Subjects

Informations

Published by
Published 08 December 2010
Reads 30
Language English
Report a problem
The Project Gutenberg EBook of The Son of Monte Christo, by Jules Lermina
This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.net
Title: The Son of Monte Christo
Author: Jules Lermina
Release Date: August 8, 2008 [EBook #26216]
Language: English
Character set encoding: ISO-8859-1
*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK THE SON OF MONTE CHRISTO ***
Produced by Sigal Alon, Hanna Burdon, Fox in the Stars and the Online Distributed Proofreading Team at http://www.pgdp.net
Transcriber's Note: Spelling, accents and punctuati on have been changed for consistency. Variations in the use of hyphens have been retained as in the original. The unexpected use of Nechar, perhaps instead of Necker, and Ali-Pacha of Jamna, perhaps instead of Ali Pasha of Janina, also have been retained.
THESONOFMONTE-CRISTO.
SEQUEL TO
THEWIFEOFMONTE-CRISTO,
AND END OF THE CONTINUATION TOALEXANDER DUMAS' CELEBRATED NOVEL OF
"THE COUNT OF MONTE-CRISTO."
"THE SO NO F MO NTE-CRISTO" stands at the head of all exciting and absorbing novels. It is the sequel to "The Wife of Monte-Cris to," and the end of the continuation of Alexander Dumas' phenomenal romance of "The Count of Monte-Cristo." Like its renowned predecessors, it a bsolutely swarms with thrilling and dramatic incidents and adventures, everything being fresh, original and delightful. The spell of fascination is cast over the reader in the opening chapter and remains unbroken to the end. It deals chiefly with the astounding career of Esperance, Monte-Cristo's son, whose heroic devotion to Jane Zeld is one of the most touching and romantic love stories ever written. The scenes in Algeria have a wild charm, especially the abduction of Esperance and his struggle with the Sultan on the oasis in the desert. Haydée's experience in the slave mart at Constantinople is particularly stirri ng and realistic, while the episodes in which the Count of Monte-Cristo figures are exceedingly graphic. The entire novel is powerful and interesting in the extreme. That it will be read by all who have read "The Count of Monte-Cristo" an d will delight them is certain.
NEWYO RK:
WM. L. ALLISON COMPANY,
PUBLISHERS.
COPYRIGHT.—1884.
T. B. PETERSON & BROTHERS.
"The Son of Monte-Cristo," the sequel to "The Wife of Monte-Cristo," and end of the continuation of Dumas' masterwork, "The Count of Monte-Cristo," is in all respects a great novel. Romantic in the highest degree, powerful in the widest sense of the term and absorbingly interesting, it is a work absolutely without parallel at the present day. Every chapter has a strong and stirring feature of its own, while all the legions of intensely thrilling incidents are as
original and surprising as they are strong. The hero is Esperance, the son of the Count of Monte-Cristo, who is followed from boyhood to the close of his wonderful and unprecedented career. His varied and remarkable adventures form a succession of amazing episodes never equalle d in fiction, while his love for the unfortunate Jane Zeld and the strange complications to which it gives rise are depicted in the most fascinating fashion. The Count of Monte-Cristo and Haydée also have thrilling adventures, and Mercédès, Benedetto, Sanselme and Danglars, together with Fanfar, again appear. The hosts of admirers of "The Count of Monte-Cristo" should read "The Son of Monte-Cristo," as well as all who relish a novel of rare merit. They will certainly be delighted with it.
"The Son of Monte-Cristo" stands at the head of all exciting and absorbing novels. It is the sequel to "The Wife of Monte-Cris to," and the end of the continuation of that phenomenal romance, Alexander Dumas' "Count of Monte-Cristo." Like its renowned predecessors, it a bsolutely swarms with thrilling and dramatic incidents and adventures, everything being fresh, original and delightful. The spell of fascination is cast over the reader in the opening chapter and remains unbroken to the end. It deals chiefly with the astounding career of Esperance, Monte-Cristo's son, whose heroic devotion to Jane Zeld is one of the most touching and romantic love stories ever written. The scenes in Algeria have a wild charm, especially the abduction of Esperance and his struggle with the Sultan on the oasis in the desert. Haydée's experience in the slave mart at Constantinople is particularly stirri ng and realistic, while the episodes in which the Count of Monte-Cristo figures are exceedingly graphic. The entire novel is powerful and interesting in the extreme. That it will be read by all who have read "The Count of Monte-Cristo" an d will delight them is certain.
CONTENTS.
Chapter. Page. I. ESPERANCE, THE SON OF MONTE-CRISTO15 II. HAYDÉE, THE WIFE OF MONTE-CRISTO23 III. THE COUNT OF MONTE-CRISTO32 IV. FANFAR'S ADVENTURES.—CAIN38 V. WHAT PIERRE KNEW40 VI. FRATERNAL THOUGHTS57 VII. THE VILLAGE61 VIII. THE PAST OF FRANÇOISE71 IX. WHERE THE INVASION PASSES76 X. THE HUT AT OUTREMONT82 XI. CHILDREN IN DARKNESS87
[Pg 11]
XII. THE RISING SUN XIII. MISCHIEF XIV. TWO PLACES, S. V. P. XV. MASTER AND SERVANT XVI. WALK IN, GENTLEMEN! XVII. ROBECCAL'S IDEA XVIII. PIERRE LABARRE XIX. A FIRST MEETING XX. THIN PARTITIONS XXI. THE GRATITUDE OF A MARQUIS XXII. POOR BOBICHEL XXIII. FRANCE—1824 XXIV. THE MARQUISE XXV. THE VEAU SAUTÉ XXVI. A MAN CHASE XXVII. A GHOST XXVIII. CINETTE! CINETTE! XXIX. A CONSPIRACY XXX. MACHIAVELLI & CO. XXXI. TRIUMPH XXXII. SURPRISES XXXIII. FACE TO FACE XXXIV. LEIGOUTTE XXXV. THE NEST XXXVI. SUPREME EFFORT XXXVII. THE TRIAL XXXVIII. THE CRISIS XXXIX. THE AUTOPSY XL. BETWEEN CHARYBDIS AND SCYLLA XLI. VIDOCQ, THE CHIEF OF POLICE XLII. TO THOSE WHO LOVE FANFAR XLIII. A LETTER FROM MONTE-CRISTO XLIV. ESPERANCE XLV. "WHAT WILL HE DO?" XLVI. FORWARD! XLVII. JANE ZELD XLVIII. A THUNDER CLAP XLIX. HOW AND WHERE L. CATASTROPHES LI. A SHOT FROM A REVOLVER LII. "WILL JANE ZELD LIVE?" LIII. JANE ZELD'S SECRET
90 96 102 107 118 125 133 142 147 154 161 170 180 188 197 204 212 217 224 229 233 237 246 258 266 275 278 286 291 296 298 304 307 310 313 320 332 338 345 353 357 361
LIV. CARMEN LV. THE BANKER LVI. ESPERANCE, MONTE-CRISTO'S SON LVII. THEY MUST BE SAVED! LVIII. GOUTRAN AND CARMEN LIX. UPON THE TRACK LX. ESPERANCE IN DESPAIR LXI. ESPERANCE GOES TO COURBERRIE LXII. COUCON LXIII. CARMEN KEEPS HER WORD LXIV. THE PLOT LXV. THE MYSTERIOUS SIGNALS LXVI. UNITED IN DEATH LXVII. THE SPECTRE LXVIII. MONTE-CRISTO, THE MARTYR LXIX. EPILOGUE
THE SON OF MONTE-CRISTO.
SEQUEL TO
THE WIFE OF MONTE-CRISTO.
CHAPTER I.
382 390 397 402 412 422 428 430 435 438 447 451 456 462 468 471
ESPERANCE, THE SON OF MONTE-CRISTO.
Esperance, the son of Monte-Cristo, lay sleeping in the comfortable bed provided for him in the house of Fanfar, the French colonist, as related at the close of the preceding volume, "The Wife of Monte-Cristo." The prostration and exhaustion brought on by the excitement and fatigue of his terrible adventure with the remorseless Khouans rendered his sleep as leaden as the sleep of death; indeed, had it not been for his heavy respiration, he might have been mistaken for a corpse. But ordinary difficulties were not to conquer the heroic son of Monte-Cristo, who seemed to have inherited all the marvelous power
[Pg 15]
and energy of his noble father, and as he lay there in the hot Algerian night, amid the balmy perfume of the luxuriant tropical fl owers, a mysterious smile hovered about the corners of his sharply cut lips that told unmistakably of a fearless nature and a firm desire to promote the success of the good and the true. Esperance slept, and the lion in him was dorm ant; it was, however, destined soon to be aroused.
In another room, around the family table, Fanfar and his guests were seated, the Count of Monte-Cristo occupying the place of honor. The colonist, at the urgent solicitation of those with whom he had so strangely been brought in contact, was about to relate the story of his life, when suddenly Monte-Cristo's quick ear caught a sound.
"What was that?" he said in a startled whisper, instantly springing to his feet.
"I heard nothing," said Fanfar.
"It was, perhaps, the cry of some wild beast," suggested Captain Joliette.
Monte-Cristo hastened to his son's apartment, followed by Fanfar, Captain Joliette and Coucon, the Zouave.
The boy was still sleeping soundly, and the apartme nt was altogether undisturbed.
Monte-Cristo uttered a sigh of relief; he bent over the beautiful child and gently kissed him on the forehead.
The party returned to the adjoining room and resumed their seats. Scarcely had they done so when a dark form, shrouded in a green bournous, appeared stealthily at the open window of Esperance's chambe r, and, gazing furtively around, lightly sprang into the room.
"Dog of a Frenchman!" hissed the intruder in a low tone between his teeth. "When you flung me over the battlements of Ouargla, you fancied you had killed me; but Maldar bears a charmed life and will have a bitter revenge!"
The intruder was indeed Maldar, the Sultan, who by some miracle had escaped Monte-Cristo's vengeance.
As he spoke he shook his fist in the direction of the Count, who was sitting at the table with the rest of Fanfar's guests, though his sombre air and clouded brow told that, while preserving his outward calmness, he yet suspected the presence of a deadly foe.
Maldar had removed his sandals, and his footsteps were noiseless. He went to the bed and stood for an instant gloating over the slumbering boy.
"I failed before, but I shall not fail again. Allah is great! I will strike this giaour of a Frenchman in his tenderest spot—his heart! The son shall pay the father's debt!"
Half-crouching and gathering his green bournous closely about him, he crept cautiously back to the window and made the sign of the crescent in the air. There was a slight flash, a pale phosphorescent glow, and in the midst of it the emblem of Islam appeared for an instant like a semi -circle of fire and then
[Pg 16]
[Pg 17]
vanished.
Immediately a Khouan showed himself at the window; he leaped into the apartment, followed by three others of his fanatica l and pitiless tribe. The new-comers instantly knelt at Maldar's feet and kissed the hem of his bournous.
"Son of the Prophet," said one of them, "we are here to do your bidding!"
"Rise," said Maldar, "and seize yonder lad, first gagging him with this sacred scarf made from Mohammed's own sainted vestment. Be quick and bear him to the desert!"
The Khouan who had acted as spokesman took the scarf from Maldar's hand and skilfully executed his command. Esperance was in such a deep slumber that he did not make a movement, even when the Arab lifted him from the bed and held him in his arms.
"Away!" cried Maldar in an undertone, adding, as the Khouan sprang from the window and disappeared in the darkness without: "Now, Count of Monte-Cristo, you are once more at my mercy, and this time you wi ll not escape my vengeance!"
He darted through the window, motioning to the rema ining Khouans to do likewise. In an instant the room was empty; the Ara bs had vanished like a vision of the night.
Ten, fifteen minutes passed, and still not a sound to break the torpor of the Algerian night, save the hum of conversation around the table of Fanfar, the colonist. Monte-Cristo's sombre air had not passed away. He was a prey to a species of uneasiness he had never experienced before. Fanfar, noticing that the Count was disturbed, that some mysterious influence was working upon him, hesitated to commence his narration. Finally he said to him:
"Count, are you anxious concerning your son? If so, you can dismiss your anxiety. The lad is in perfect safety beneath my roof; his slumber will refresh him, and he will awake entirely restored. As for the Khouans, they never deign to visit my humble habitation, and they will hardly break their rule to come here now. Still, to satisfy you and put all your apprehensions at rest, I will go and take a look at the lad."
He arose and went to Esperance's room. In an instant he returned. His face had the pallor of wax.
Monte-Cristo leaped nervously to his feet and stood staring at him, his countenance wearing an expression of intense anguish.
"Well?" said he, in an unsteady voice.
Fanfar was breathless with excitement and terror. When he could find words, he said:
"The lad is gone!"
"My God!" cried Monte-Cristo, putting his hand to his forehead and staggering beneath the overwhelming blow, "I felt it! I had a premonition of some impending disaster, I knew not what! Oh! Esperance! Esperance!"
[Pg 18]
[Pg 19]
He hurried into the adjoining room and stood beside the empty bed. The moon was now shining in unclouded splendor and the apartment was almost as light as day. The slight covering had been torn from the couch and lay in a heap on the floor. Near it a small object sparkled; the ago nized father stooped and picked it up: it was a miniature dagger of oriental workmanship, and upon its jeweled handle was an inscription in the Arabic tongue. Monte-Cristo took the weapon to the window and the full light of the silvery moonbeams fell upon it. The inscription was from the Koran, and was a maxim adopted by the Khouan tribe. The Count read it and trembled.
"I recognize this weapon," said he; "it is Maldar's. The Sultan is living and has been here! It is to him I owe this terrible misfortune—he has carried away my son!"
Miss Elphys approached the Count and touched his arm.
"We must start in pursuit at once!" said she, with a look of courage and determination.
"We?" cried Madame Caraman, aghast. "You, surely, do not mean again to face the dangers of this barbarous country, to go u pon another Quixotic expedition, and drag me with you? Remember you are a woman! Besides, there are plenty of men here for the task!"
Clary glanced at the governess with indignation, but vouchsafed no reply to her selfish speech.
"Mademoiselle," said Captain Joliette, addressing the heroic girl, "your feelings do you honor; but I for one cannot consent for you to imperil your life in a night hunt for the dastardly Khouans, who have certainly made their way to the desert with the abducted lad. Madame Caraman is right; you must not again face the dangers of this barbarous country. Remain here with Madame Irène and Madame Caraman. I will organize and lead the pursuit."
Monte-Cristo, who, in the face of the new dangers that threatened his son, had recovered somewhat of his accustomed calmness, came to them and said:
"I thank you, Miss Elphys, for your generosity and bravery, but you must take the Captain's advice. Captain Joliette, I fully appreciate your motives in wishing to take command in this pursuit, but, at the same time, I must claim the precedence. Remember I am a father, and have a father's duty to perform. I will lead the pursuit."
Captain Joliette bowed.
"So be it," said he, "it is your right."
Coucon, Fanfar, Gratillet and Iron Jaws eagerly offered their services, and even Bobichel forgot his merry pranks and demanded to accompany the expedition. The Count of Monte-Cristo desired the former clown to remain for the protection of the ladies, but Miss Elphys protested against this.
"Take Bobichel with you," she said. "We can protect ourselves."
Bobichel, overjoyed, ran for the horses, and the little army instantly mounted, riding away toward the desert at the top of their animals' speed, with Monte-
[Pg 20]
[Pg 21]
Cristo at their head.
Meanwhile Maldar and his Khouan followers were dash ing along at a rapid pace on the fleet Arab coursers with which they were provided. One of the party bore Esperance before him on his saddle. The boy had not been aroused from his lethargic sleep by the abduction and subsequent flight. He slept peacefully and profoundly.
The fanatical Arabs maintained unbroken silence, an d the sound of their horses' hoofs was deadened by the sand.
Maldar rode a trifle in advance. Now that the excitement of the abduction had worn off, he was as stoical as the rest, but occasionally, as he thought of his triumph over Monte-Cristo and the vengeance he was about to take upon his hated enemy, for he had decided to put Esperance to a lingering and terrible death and send the lad's gory head to the agonized father, a grim smile stole over his otherwise impassible countenance, and a demoniac gleam shot from his eyes.
But suddenly a faint sound was heard in the far dis tance. It came from the direction of Fanfar's farm. Maldar listened attenti vely; then he said to the Khouans, whose quick ears had also detected the sound:
"Ride like the wind, sons of the Prophet! We are pursued! The Count of Monte-Cristo and his unbelieving French hounds are on our track! But if they would overtake us and recover the boy, they must have the cunning of serpents and horses as fleet as the lightning's flash!"
CHAPTER II.
HAYDÉE, THE WIFE OF MONTE-CRISTO.
It was in Monte-Cristo's luxurious mansion in Marseilles, one bright morning in April. Since the Count's departure for Algeria in search of her son, Mercédès, faithful to her oath never to leave Haydée, had taken up her residence there. The two women who had filled such important places in the life of Monte-Cristo were sitting together in the large drawing-room, the windows of which looked out upon the calm blue waters of the Mediterranean. These windows were open and through them floated the delightful perfume of the flowers from the garden beyond, mingled with the saline odors of the sea. It was about ten o'clock and the sun, high in the heavens, inundated the vast apartment with its golden light and filled it with a generous warmth.
Haydée, the wife of Monte-Cristo, reclined upon an oriental rug, her head pillowed in the lap of Mercédès, who sat on a divan elegantly upholstered in the eastern fashion. Mercédès was lightly toying with Haydée's glossy hair that fell like a cloud about her shapely shoulders. Her eyes were beaming with affection, while those of Haydée had in them a dreamy, faraway look.
"Sister," said Mercédès at last, "why are you so sad and silent?"
[Pg 22]
[Pg 23]
[Pg 24]
"I know not," replied the wife of Monte-Cristo, languidly.
"You are thinking of your husband, the noblest of men, who is even now, perhaps, risking his life in the Algerian desert to save and recover my son."
"You speak truly," returned Haydée with a shudder; "I am thinking of him, and my heart is strangely oppressed."
"Have confidence in Monte-Cristo," said her compani on, earnestly. "His lion courage, wonderful mental resources and mysterious power will render him more than a match for the untutored Arabs with whom it is his mission to contend."
"Yes, Mercédès; but my son, my Esperance? He is so young to be exposed to the dangers of the desert!"
"But Monte-Cristo is with him, and the father's love will shield him from all harm."
Haydée made no reply, but continued to gaze dreamily into space. Mercédès, still toying with her hair, strove to rouse her.
"Sister," said she, abruptly, "yesterday you promised to tell me how Monte-Cristo rescued you from the hands of the Turkish slave-dealer, Ali Pasha. Will you not fulfil that promise now?"
Haydée turned her eyes full on her companion's countenance and a look of gratitude passed over her pale visage. She saw that Mercédès wished to draw her mind from the contemplation of her husband's present peril by inducing her to revert to his heroism of the past.
"I will tell you," said she, "here in this apartment where everything, even to the very air, is vital with souvenirs of my beloved husband." And, without altering her position, Haydée at once commenced the following thrilling narration:
"We were cruising off the coast of Egypt in the Alcyon, when the idea of visiting Constantinople suddenly occurred to Monte-Cristo. He gave his orders without an instant's delay and the yacht was immediately he aded for the Sultan's dominions.
"We reached Constantinople in due time, after an ex ceedingly pleasant voyage, for though it was toward the close of spring the weather was mild and for weeks the sea had been as calm and unruffled as a mirror.
"As we entered the Bosporus, we noticed a strange craft hovering near us. It was a small, rakish-looking vessel bearing the Turkish flag. Monte-Cristo had run up his private ensign on the Alcyon, an ensign that was recognized by all nations and gave the yacht free entrance into every port.
"The strange craft seemed to be following us, but a s it made no attempt to approach the yacht, we soon became used to its presence and ceased to give it attention.
"When the Alcyon anchored, a gorgeously decorated caique, manned by a score of stalwart oarsmen, shot from shore and was soon alongside of the yacht. A magnificently-appareled old man with a long, snowy beard, attended
[Pg 25]
[Pg 26]
by four solemn and stately eunuchs, came on board and was ceremoniously received by the Count. It was the Grand Vizier, who, having recognized Monte-Cristo's ensign, had hastened to welcome the illustrious hero to Constantinople in the name of his august master, the Sultan.
"Such an honor merited prompt and becoming recognition, and Monte-Cristo was too much of a Frenchman not to return compliment for compliment. Leaving the Alcyon in charge of his first officer, and bidd ing me a hasty and tender farewell, the Count entered the caique with the Grand Vizier and departed to pay his respects in person to the ruler of the Turkish nation.
"No sooner was the caique lost to sight among the shipping than the strange craft we had previously observed suddenly ran up to the yacht and made fast to her with grappling-irons. Before Monte-Cristo's men could recover from their surprise at this manœuvre they were made prisoners and securely bound by twenty Turkish buccaneers, who had leaped over the bulwarks of the Alcyon, headed by a villainous-looking wretch, furiously br andishing a jeweled yataghan. This was Ali Pasha, the slave-dealer, as I soon learned to my cost.
"When the ruffians boarded the yacht, I had rushed below and hidden myself in Monte-Cristo's cabin, first securing a keen-bladed dagger for my defence.
"I had locked the door, but it was almost instantly burst open and Ali Pasha leaped in, followed by several of his crew.
"Holding my weapon uplifted in my hand, I cried out, in a tone of desperate determination:
"'The first scoundrel who dares to lay a finger on me shall die like a dog!'
"This speech was greeted with a loud burst of contemptuous laughter, and Ali Pasha himself, springing forward, whirled the dagger from my grasp with his yataghan. This done, he sternly fixed his glance upon me and said:
"'Haydée, wife of Monte-Cristo, Haydée, the Greek slave, you are my captive! Sons of Islam, seize her and conduct her to the slave mart of Stamboul!'
"Three Turks advanced to obey this command. They seized me and in vain did I struggle in their ruffianly grasp. In a moment I was securely bound and gagged. A mantle was thrown over my head. I felt myself thrust into a sack and swooned just as one of the buccaneers was lifting me upon his shoulder.
"When I recovered consciousness, I found myself, with a number of half-clad Georgian and Circassian girls, in the dreaded slave bazaar of Constantinople. Old memories, fraught with terror, rushed upon me. I recalled the time when I was before exposed for sale and Monte-Cristo had bought me. Would he come to my rescue once more? I scarcely dared to hope for such a thing. I pictured to myself the Count's desolation and distress on disco vering that I had been stolen from him. But what could he do? How could he find me again? And even should he discover me, how could he snatch me from the grasp of Ali Pasha, whose favor with the Sultan was notorious? Monte-Cristo, with all his prestige, was but one man, and no match for the mendaciousness, duplicity and power of the entire Turkish court! I was lost, and nothing could save me!
"How shall I describe my feelings when I realized that I was even then, at that
[Pg 27]
[Pg 28]