The Story of Hiawatha - Adapted from Longfellow
115 Pages
English

The Story of Hiawatha - Adapted from Longfellow

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Published 08 December 2010
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The Project Gutenberg EBook of The Story of Hiawatha, by Winston Stokes and Henry Wadsworth Longfellow This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.net Title: The Story of Hiawatha Adapted from Longfellow Author: Winston Stokes Henry Wadsworth Longfellow Illustrator: M. L. Kirk Release Date: April 9, 2010 [EBook #31926] Language: English Character set encoding: ISO-8859-1 *** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK THE STORY OF HIAWATHA *** Produced by Emmy, Tor Martin Kristiansen and the Online Distributed Proofreading Team at http://www.pgdp.net (This file was produced from images generously made available by The Internet Archive) THE STORY OF HIAWATHA [i] [iv] "FROM THE FULL MOON FELL NOKOMIS"—Page 123 [v] THE STORY OF HIAWATHA ADAPTED FROM :LONGFELLOW: BY WINSTON STOKES WITH THE ORIGINAL POEM Illustrated by M · L · KIRK NEW YORK FREDERICK · A · STOKES COMPANY PUBLISHERS Copyright, 1910, By FREDERICK A. STOKES COMPANY All rights reserved September, 1910 [vi] PREFACE In this land of change it is important that we may learn a little of the childlike people who preceded us; who hunted, fished and worshipped long ago where we now make our homes and lead our lives. No other legends have so strange a charm, or such appealing local interest, as legends of the wildwood, and nowhere are these so well expressed as in Longfellow's poem of Hiawatha. To furnish a simple medium through which both younger and older people of today may be brought closer, by Longfellow, to the mystery of the forest, this prose rendering of "Hiawatha" has been written. It follows closely the narrative of the poem, and in many places Longfellow's own words have been introduced into its pages, for the purpose of this volume is to awaken interest and pleasure in the poem itself. [vii] CONTENTS THE STORY OF HIAWATHA PAGE [ix] PREFACE CHAPTER I. THE PEACE-PIPE II. THE FOUR WINDS III. HIAWATHA'S CHILDHOOD IV. HIAWATHA AND MUDJEKEEWIS V. HIAWATHA'S FASTING VI. HIAWATHA'S FRIENDS VII. HIAWATHA'S SAILING VIII. HIAWATHA'S FISHING IX. HIAWATHA AND THE PEARL-FEATHER X. HIAWATHA'S WOOING XI. HIAWATHA'S WEDDING FEAST XII. THE SON OF THE EVENING STAR XIII. BLESSING THE CORNFIELDS XIV. PICTURE WRITING XV. HIAWATHA'S LAMENTATION XVI. PAU-PUK-KEEWIS XVII. THE HUNTING OF PAU-PUK-KEEWIS XVIII. THE DEATH OF KWASIND XIX. THE GHOSTS XX. THE FAMINE XXI. THE WHITE MAN'S FOOT XXII. HIAWATHA'S DEPARTURE vii 1 3 11 15 19 23 27 30 34 38 43 47 53 57 60 65 70 76 80 84 88 92 CONTENTS THE SONG OF HIAWATHA [x] PAGE INTRODUCTION CANTO I. THE PEACE-PIPE II. THE FOUR WINDS III. HIAWATHA'S CHILDHOOD IV. HIAWATHA AND MUDJEKEEWIS V. HIAWATHA'S FASTING VI. HIAWATHA'S FRIENDS VII. HIAWATHA'S SAILING VIII. HIAWATHA'S FISHING IX. HIAWATHA AND THE PEARL-FEATHER X. HIAWATHA'S WOOING XI. HIAWATHA'S WEDDING FEAST XII. THE SON OF THE EVENING STAR XIII. BLESSING THE CORNFIELDS XIV. PICTURE WRITING XV. HIAWATHA'S LAMENTATION XVI. PAU-PUK-KEEWIS XVII. THE HUNTING OF PAU-PUK-KEEWIS XVIII. THE DEATH OF KWASIND XIX. THE GHOSTS XX. THE FAMINE XXI. THE WHITE MAN'S FOOT XXII. HIAWATHA'S DEPARTURE 99 105 111 123 133 144 156 163 168 178 189 200 210 225 234 241 250 260 274 279 288 295 304 ILLUSTRATIONS "OF ALL BEASTS HE LEARNED THE LANGUAGE" "FROM THE FULL MOON FELL NOKOMIS" "DEAD HE LAY THERE IN THE SUNSET" "PLEASANT WAS THE JOURNEY HOMEWARD" "SEVEN LONG DAYS AND NIGHTS HE SAT THERE" "GIVE ME OF YOUR ROOTS, O TAMARACK" "TAKE MY BAIT, O KING OF FISHES" HE BEGAN HIS MYSTIC DANCES "HELD BY UNSEEN HANDS BUT SINKING" "AND EACH FIGURE HAD A MEANING" "HURLED THE PINE CONES DOWN UPON HIM" "WESTWARD, WESTWARD HIAWATHA SAILED INTO THE FIERY SUNSET" [xi] Cover Frontispiece FACING PAGE 22 42 86 164 170 204 222 236 278 310 THE STORY OF HIAWATHA I THE PEACE-PIPE ONG ago, when our cities were pleasant woodlands and the white man was far beyond the seas, the great Manito, God of all the Indians, descended to the earth. From the red crags of the Great Red Pipestone Quarry he gazed upon the country that he ruled, and a silver river gushed from his footprints and turned to gold as it met the morning sun. The Great Manito stooped to gather some of the red stone of the quarry, and molded it with giant fingers into a mighty pipe-bowl; he plucked a reed from the river bank for a pipe-stem, filled the pipe with the bark of the willow, breathed upon the forest until the great boughs chafed together into flame, and there alone upon the mountains he smoked the pipe of peace. The smoke rose high and slowly in the air. Far above the tops of the tallest pine-trees it rose in a thin blue line, so that all the nations might see and hasten at the summons of the Great Manito; and the smoke as it rose grew thicker and purer and whiter, rolling and unfolding in the air until it glistened like a great white fleecy cloud that touched the top [2] of heaven. The Indians saw it from the Valley of Wyoming, and from Tuscaloosa and the far-off Rocky Mountains, and their prophets said: "Come and obey the summons of the Great Manito, who calls the tribes of men to council!" Over the prairies, down the rivers, through the forests, from north and south and east and west, the red men hastened to approach the smoke-cloud. There were Delawares and Dacotahs and Choctaws and Comanches and Pawnees and Blackfeet and Shoshonies,—all the tribes of Indians in the world, and one and [1] L all they gathered at the Pipestone Quarry, where the Great Manito stood and waited for them. And the Great Manito saw that they glared at one another angrily, and he stretched his right hand over them and said: "My children, I have given you a happy land, where you may fish and hunt. I have filled the rivers with the trout and sturgeon. There are wild fowl in the lakes and marshes; there are bears in the forest and bison on the prairie. Now listen to my warning, for I am weary of your endless quarrels: I will send a Prophet to you, who shall guide you and teach you and share your sufferings. Obey him, and all will be well with you. Disobey him, and you shall be scattered like the autumn leaves. Wash the war-paint and the bloodstains from your bodies; mould the red stone of the quarry into peace-pipes, and smoke with me the pipe of peace and brotherhood that shall last forever." The tones of his deep voice died away, and the Indians broke their weapons and bathed in the sparkling river.