The Story of Paris
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The Story of Paris

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The Project Gutenberg EBook of The Story of Paris, by Thomas Okey
This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with
almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or
re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included
with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.org
Title: The Story of Paris
Author: Thomas Okey
Illustrator: Katherine Kimball
Release Date: August 28, 2008 [EBook #26450]
Language: English
*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK THE STORY OF PARIS ***
Produced by Juliet Sutherland, Hélène de Mink and the
Online Distributed Proofreading Team at http://www.pgdp.net
Transcriber's note: Minor spelling inconsistencies, mainly hyphenated words, have been harmonised. Obvious printer
errors have been repaired.
Accents:
In French sentences, most of them italicized, accents have been added, when necessary, according to the French
spelling rules of the time.
In an English context, French words have no accents if there are no accents in the original text. In case of an inconsistent
use of accents, the French spelling has been favoured.
The Latin numbers (i and ii) in the text refers to transcriber's notes at the end of this e-book.
The advertisement for other books in the series have been removed from page 3 to the end of this e-book.
cover
Cover.
View larger image
The Story of Paris
Samothrace.
Winged Victory of Samothrace.
View larger image
The Story of Paris
by Thomas Okey
With Illustrations by
Katherine ...

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Published 08 December 2010
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The Project Gutenberg EBook of The Story of Paris,
by Thomas Okey
This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no
cost and with
almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it,
give it away or
re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg
License included
with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.org
Title: The Story of Paris
Author: Thomas Okey
Illustrator: Katherine Kimball
Release Date: August 28, 2008 [EBook #26450]
Language: English
*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK
THE STORY OF PARIS ***
Produced by Juliet Sutherland, Hélène de Mink and
the
Online Distributed Proofreading Team atOnline Distributed Proofreading Team at
http://www.pgdp.net
Transcriber's note: Minor spelling inconsistencies,
mainly hyphenated words, have been harmonised.
Obvious printer errors have been repaired.
Accents:
In French sentences, most of them italicized, accents
have been added, when necessary, according to the
French spelling rules of the time.
In an English context, French words have no accents
if there are no accents in the original text. In case of
an inconsistent use of accents, the French spelling
has been favoured.
The Latin numbers (i and ii) in the text refers to
transcriber's notes at the end of this e-book.
The advertisement for other books in the series have
been removed from page 3 to the end of this e-book.
cover
Cover.
View larger image
The Story of ParisSamothrace.
Winged Victory of Samothrace.
View larger image
The Story of Paris
by Thomas Okey
With Illustrations by
Katherine Kimball
deco
London: J.M. Dent & Sons Ltd.
Aldine House, 10-13 Bedford Street
Covent Garden, W.C. * * *
New York: E.P. Dutton & Co.—1919
First Edition, 1906
Reprinted, 1911; July, 1919
"I will not forget this, that I can never mutinie so much
against France but I must needes looke on Paris with
a favourable eye: it hath my hart from my infancy;
whereof it hath befalne me, as of excellent things, the
more other faire and stately cities I have seene since,
the more hir beauty hath power and doth still
usurpingly gaine upon my affections. I love that citie
for hir own sake, and more in hir only subsisting andowne being, than when it is fall fraught and
embellished with forraine pompe and borrowed garish
ornaments. I love hir so tenderly that hir spottes, her
blemishes and hir warts are deare unto me. I am no
perfect French man but by this great citie, great in
people, great in regard of the felicitie of hir situation,
but above all great and incomparable in varietie and
diversitie of commodities; the glory of France and one
of the noblest and chiefe ornaments of the world. God
of his mercy free hir and chase away all our divisions
from hir. So long as she shall continue, so long shall I
never want a home or a retreat to retire and shrowd
myselfe at all times."
—Montaigne.
"Quand Dieu eslut nonante et dix royaumes
Tot le meillor torna en douce France."
Couronnement Loys.
PREFACE
In recasting Paris and its Story for issue in the
"Mediæval Towns Series," opportunity has been taken
of revising the whole and of adding a Second Part,
wherein we have essayed the office of cicerone.
Obviously in so vast a range of study as that afforded
by the city of Paris, compression and selection have
been imperative: we have therefore limited our
guidance to such routes and edifices as seemed to
offer the more important objects of historic and artistic
interest, excluding from our purview, with much regret,the works of contemporary artists. On the Louvre, as
the richest Thesaurus of beautiful things in Europe, we
have dwelt at some length and even so it has been
possible only to deal broadly with its contents. A book
has, however, this advantage over a corporeal guide;
it can be curtly dismissed without fear of offence,
when antipathy may impel the traveller to pass by, or
sympathy invite him to linger over, the various objects
indicated to his gaze. In a city where change is so
constant and the housebreaker's pick so active, any
work dealing with monuments of the past must needs
soon become imperfect. Since the publication of Paris
and its Story in the autumn of 1904, a picturesque
group of old houses in the Rue de l'Arbre Sec,
including the Hôtel des Mousquetaires, the traditional
lodging of Dumas' d'Artagnan, has been swept away
and a monstrous mass of engineering is now reared
on its site: even as we write other demolitions of
historic buildings are in progress. Care has, however,
been taken to bring this little work up to date and our
constant desire has been to render it useful to the
inexperienced visitor to Paris. Success in so
complicated and difficult a task can be but partial, and
in this as in so many of life's aims "our wills," as good
Sir Thomas Browne says, "must be our performances,
and our intents make out our actions; otherwise our
pious labours shall find anxiety in our graves and our
best endeavours not hope, but fear, a resurrection."
It now remains to acknowledge our indebtedness to
the following, among other authorities, which are here
set down to obviate the necessity for repeated
footnotes, and to indicate to readers who may desire
to pursue the study of the history and art of Paris inmore detail, some works among the enormous mass
of literature on the subject that will repay perusal.
For the general history of France, the monumental
Histoire de France now in course of publication, edited
by E. Lavisse; Michelet's Histoire de France, Recits de
l'Histoire de France, and Procès des Templiers; Victor
Duruy, Histoire de France; the cheap and admirable
selection of authorities in the seventeen volumes of
the Histoire de France racontée par les
Contemporains, edited by B. Zeller; Carl Faulmann,
Illustrirte Geschichte der Buchdruckerkunst; the
Chronicles of Gregory of Tours, Richer, Abbo,
Joinville, Villani, Froissart, De Comines; Géographie
Historique, by A. Guerard; Froude's essay on the
Templars; Jeanne d'Arc, Maid of Orleans, by T.
Douglas Murray; Paris sous Philip le Bel, edited by H.
Geraud.
For the later Monarchy, the Revolutionary and
Napoleonic periods, the Histories of Carlyle, Mignet,
Michelet and Louis Blanc; the Origines de la France
Contemporaine, by Taine; the Cambridge Modern
History, Vol. VIII.; the Memoirs of the Duc de St.
Simon, of Madame Campan, Madame Vigée-Lebrun,
Camille Desmoulins, Madame Roland and Paul Louis
Courier; the Journal de Perlet; Histoire de la Société
Française pendant la Révolution, by J. de Goncourt;
Goethe's Die Campagne in Frankreich, 1792;
Légendes et Archives de la Bastille, by F. Funck
Brentano; Life of Napoleon I., by J. Holland Rose;
L'Europe et la Révolution Française, by Albert Sorel;
the periodical, La Révolution Française; Contemporary
American Opinion of the French Revolution, by C.D.Hazen.
For the particular history of Paris, the exhaustive and
comprehensive Histoire de la Ville de Paris, by Michel
Félibien and Guy Alexis Lobineau; the so-called
Journal d'un Bourgeois de Paris, edited by L. Lalanne;
Paris Pendant la Domination Anglaise, by A. Longnon;
the more modern Paris à Travers les Ages, by M.F.
Hoffbauer, E. Fournier and others; the Topographie
Historique du Vieux Paris, by A. Berty and H. Legrand,
and other works now issued or in course of publication
by the Ville de Paris. Howell's Familiar Letters,
Coryat's Crudities, Evelyn's Diary, and Sir Samuel
Romilly's Letters, contain useful matter. For the
chapters on Historical Paris, E. Fournier's Promenade
Historique dans Paris, Chronique des Rues de Paris,
Énigmes des Rues de Paris; the Marquis de
Rochegude's Guide Pratique à Travers le Vieux Paris;
the Dictionnaire Historique de Paris, by G. Pessard,
and the excellent Nouvel Itinéraire Guide Artistique et
Archéologique de Paris, by C. Normand, published by
the Société des Amis des Monuments Parisiens.
For French art, Félibien's Entretiens; the writings of
Lady Dilke; French Painting in the Sixteenth Century,
by L. Dimier; Histoire de l'Art, Peinture, École
Française, by Cazes d'Aix and J. Bérard; the
compendious History of Modern Painting, by R.
Muther; The Great French Painters, by C. Mauclair;
La Sculpture Française, by L. Gonse; Mediæval Art,
by W.R. Lethaby; the Catalogue of the Exposition des
Primitifs Français (1904); Le Peinture en Europe, Le
Louvre, by Lafenestre and Richtenberger, and the
official catalogues of the Louvre collections. All thesehave been largely drawn upon and supplemented by
affectionate memories of an acquaintance with Paris
and many of its citizens dating back for more than
thirty years.
May we add a last word of practical counsel.
Distances in Paris are great, and the traveller who
would economise time and reduce fatigue will do well
to bargain with his host to be free to take the mid-day
meal wherever his journeyings may lead him.
April, 1906.
PREFACE TO THE SECOND EDITION
The demolition of Old Paris has proceeded apace
since the publication of the Story of Paris in 1906. The
Tower of Dagobert; the old Academy of Medicine; the
Annexe of the Hôtel Dieu and a whole street, the Rue
du Petit Pont; the Hôtel of the Provost of Paris—all
have fallen under the housebreakers' picks. As we
write the curious vaulted entrance to the old charnel
houses of St Paul is being swept away and the
revision of this little book has been a melancholy task
to a lover of historic Paris. Part II. of the work has
been brought up to date and the changes in the
Louvre noted: it is much to be regretted that the new
edition of the official Catalogue of the Foreign Schools
of Painting promised by the authorities in 1909 has not
yet seen the light.
May, 1911.
CONTENTSIntroduction
PART I.: THE STORY
CHAPTER I
Gallo-Romain Paris
CHAPTER II
The Barbarian Invasions—St. Genevieve—The
Conversion of Clovis—The Merovingian Dynasty
CHAPTER III
The Carlovingians—The Great Siege of Paris by the
Normans—The Germs of Feudalism
CHAPTER IV
The Rise of the Capetian Kings and the Growth of
Feudal Paris
CHAPTER V
Paris under Philip Augustus and St. Louis
CHAPTER VI
Art and Learning at Paris
CHAPTER VII
Conflict with Boniface VIII.—The States-General—The
Destruction of the Knights-Templars—The Parlement