The Wandering Jew — Volume 07
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The Wandering Jew — Volume 07

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The Project Gutenberg EBook of The Wandering Jew, Book VII., by Eugene SueThis eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it,give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online atwww.gutenberg.netTitle: The Wandering Jew, Book VII.Author: Eugene SueRelease Date: October 25, 2004 [EBook #3345]Language: English*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK THE WANDERING JEW, BOOK VII. ***Produced by David Widger and Pat CastevensTHE WANDERING JEWBy Eugene SueBOOK VII.XL. The East Indian in ParisXLI. RisingXLII. DoubtsXLIII. The LetterXLIV. Adrienne and DjalmaXLV. The ConsultationXLVI. Mother Bunch's DiaryXLVII. The Diary ContinuedXLVIII. The DiscoveryXLIX. The Trysting-Place of the WolvesL. The Common Dwelling-HouseLI. The SecretLII. RevelationsCHAPTER XL.THE EAST INDIAN IN PARIS.Since three days, Mdlle. de Cardoville had left Dr. Baleinier's. The following scene took place in a little dwelling in theRue Blanche, to which Djalma had been conducted in the name of his unknown protector. Fancy to yourself a pretty,circular apartment, hung with Indian drapery, with purple figures on a gray ground, just relieved by a few threads of gold.The ceiling, towards the centre, is concealed by similar hangings, tied together by a thick, silken cord; the two ends ofthis cord, unequal in length, terminated, instead of tassels, in two tiny ...

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The Project Gutenberg EBook of The Wandering
Jew, Book VII., by Eugene Sue
This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at
no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever.
You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the
terms of the Project Gutenberg License included
with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.net
Title: The Wandering Jew, Book VII.
Author: Eugene Sue
Release Date: October 25, 2004 [EBook #3345]
Language: English
*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG
EBOOK THE WANDERING JEW, BOOK VII. ***
Produced by David Widger and Pat CastevensTHE WANDERING JEW
By Eugene SueBOOK VII.
XL. The East Indian in Paris
XLI. Rising
XLII. Doubts
XLIII. The Letter
XLIV. Adrienne and Djalma
XLV. The Consultation
XLVI. Mother Bunch's Diary
XLVII. The Diary Continued
XLVIII. The Discovery
XLIX. The Trysting-Place of the Wolves
L. The Common Dwelling-House
LI. The Secret
LII. RevelationsCHAPTER XL.
THE EAST INDIAN IN PARIS.
Since three days, Mdlle. de Cardoville had left Dr.
Baleinier's. The following scene took place in a little
dwelling in the Rue Blanche, to which Djalma had
been conducted in the name of his unknown
protector. Fancy to yourself a pretty, circular
apartment, hung with Indian drapery, with purple
figures on a gray ground, just relieved by a few
threads of gold. The ceiling, towards the centre, is
concealed by similar hangings, tied together by a
thick, silken cord; the two ends of this cord,
unequal in length, terminated, instead of tassels, in
two tiny Indian lamps of gold filigreed-work,
marvellously finished. By one of those ingenious
combinations, so common in barbarous countries,
these lamps served also to burn perfumes. Plates
of blue crystal, let in between the openings of the
arabesque, and illumined by the interior light,
shone with so limpid an azure, that the golden
lamps seemed starred with transparent sapphires.
Light clouds, of whitish vapor rose incessantly from
these lamps, and spread all around their balmy
odor.
Daylight was only admitted to this room (it was
about two o'clock in the afternoon) through a little
greenhouse, on the other side of a door of plate-
glass, made to slide into the thickness of the wall,by means of a groove. A Chinese shade was
arranged so as to hide or replace this glass at
pleasure. Some dwarf palm tress, plantains, and
other Indian productions, with thick leaves of a
metallic green, arranged in clusters in this
conservatory, formed, as it were, the background
to two large variegated bushes of exotic flowers,
which were separated by a narrow path, paved
with yellow and blue Japanese tiles, running to the
foot of the glass. The daylight, already much
dimmed by the leaves through which it passed,
took a hue of singular mildness as it mingled with
the azure lustre of the perfumed lamps, and the
crimson brightness of the fire in the tall chimney of
oriental porphyry. In the obscurity of this
apartment, impregnated with sweet odors and the
aromatic vapor of Persian tobacco, a man with
brown, hanging locks, dressed in a long robe of
dark green, fastened round the waist by a parti-
colored sash, was kneeling upon a magnificent
Turkey carpet, filling the golden bowl of a hookah;
the long, flexible tube of this pipe, after rolling its
folds upon the carpet, like a scarlet serpent with
silver scales, rested between the slender fingers of
Djalma, who was reclining negligently on a divan.
The young prince was bareheaded; his jet-black
hair, parted on the middle of his forehead,
streamed waving about his face and neck of
antique beauty—their warm transparent colors
resembling amber or topaz. Leaning his elbow on a
cushion, he supported his chin with the palm of his
right hand. The flowing sleeve of his robe, falling
back from his arm, which was round as that of a
woman, revealed mysterious signs formerlytattooed there in India by a Thug's needle. The son
of Radja-sing held in his left hand the amber
mouthpiece of his pipe. His robe of magnificent
cashmere, with a border of a thousand hues,
reaching to his knee, was fastened about his slim
and well-formed figure by the large folds of an
orange-colored shawl. This robe was half
withdrawn from one of the elegant legs of this
Asiatic Antinous, clad in a kind of very close fitting
gaiter of crimson velvet, embroidered with silver,
and terminating in a small white morocco slipper,
with a scarlet heel. At once mild and manly, the
countenance of Djalma was expressive of that
melancholy and contemplative calmness habitual to
the Indian and the Arab, who possess the happy
privilege of uniting, by a rare combination, the
meditative indolence of the dreamer with the fiery
energy of the man of action—now delicate,
nervous, impressionable as women—now
determined, ferocious, and sanguinary as bandits.
And this semi-feminine comparison, applicable to
the moral nature of the Arab and the Indian, so
long as they are not carried away by the ardor of
battle and the excitement of carnage, is almost
equally applicable to their physical constitution; for
if, like women of good blood, they have small
extremities, slender limbs, fine and supple forms,
this delicate and often charming exterior always
covers muscles of steel, full of an elasticity, and
vigor truly masculine. Djalma's oblong eyes, like
black diamonds set in bluish mother-of-pearl,
wandered mechanically from the exotic flowers to
the ceiling; from time to time he raised the ambermouthpiece of the hookah to his lips; then, after a
slow aspiration, half opening his rosy lips, strongly
contrasted with the shining enamel of his teeth, he
sent forth a little spiral line of smoke, freshly
scented by the rose-water through which it had
passed.
"Shall I put more tobacco in the hookah?" said the
kneeling figure, turning towards Djalma, and
revealing the marked and sinister features of
Faringhea the Strangler.
The young prince remained dumb, either that, from
an oriental contempt for certain races, he
disdained to answer the half-caste, or that,
absorbed in his reverie, he did not even hear him.
The Strangler became again silent; crouching
cross-legged upon the carpet, with his elbows
resting on his knees, and his chin upon his hands,
he kept his eyes fixed on Djalma, and seemed to
await the reply or the orders of him whose sire had
been surnamed the Father of the Generous. How
had Faringhea, the sanguinary worshipper of
Bowanee, the Divinity of Murder, been brought to
seek or to accept such humble functions? How
came this man, possessed of no vulgar talents,
whose passionate eloquence and ferocious energy
had recruited many assassins for the service of the
Good Work, to resign himself to so base a
condition? Why, too, had this man, who, profiting
by the young prince's blindness with regard to
himself, might have so easily sacrificed him as an
offering to Bowanee—why had he spared the life of
Radja-sings son? Why, in fine, did he exposehimself to such frequent encounters with Rodin,
whom he had only known under the most
unfavorable auspices? The sequel of this story will
answer all these questions. We can only say at
present, that, after a long interview with Rodin, two
nights before, the Thug had quitted him with
downcast eyes and cautious bearing.
After having remained silent for some time, Djalma,
following with his eye the cloud of whitish smoke
that he had just sent forth into space, addressed
Faringhea, without looking at him, and said to him
in the language, as hyperbolical as concise, of
Orientals: "Time passes. The old man with the
good heart does not come. But he will come. His
word is his word."
"His word is his word, my lord," repeated
Faringhea, in an affirmative tone. "When he came
to fetch you, three days ago, from the house
whither those wretches, in furtherance of their
wicked designs, had conveyed you in a deep sleep
—after throwing me, your watchful and devoted
servant, into a similar state—he said to you: 'The
unknown friend, who sent for you to Cardoville
Castle, bids me come to you, prince. Have
confidence, and follow me. A worthy abode is
prepared for you.'—And again, he said to you, my
lord: 'Consent not to leave the house, until my
return. Your interest requires it. In three days you
will see me again, and then be restored to perfect
freedom.' You consented to those terms, my lord,
and for three days you have not left the house.""And I wait for the old man with impatience," said
Djalma, "for this solitude is heavy with me. There
must be so many things to admire in Paris. Above
all."
Djalma did not finish the sentence, but relapsed
into a reverie. After some moments' silence, the
son of Radja-sing said suddenly to Faringhea, in
the tone of an impatient yet indolent sultan: "Speak
to me!"
"Of what shall I speak, my lord?"
"Of what you will," said Djalma, with careless
contempt, as he fixed on the ceiling his eyes, half-
veiled with languor. "One thought pursues me—I
wish to be diverted from it. Speak to me."
Faringhea threw a piercing glance on the
countenance of the young Indian, and saw that his
cheeks were colored with a slight blush. "My lord,"
said the half-caste, "I can guess your thought."
Djalma shook his head, without looking at the
Strangler. The latter resumed: "You are thinking of
the women of Paris, my lord."
"Be silent, slave!" said Djalma, turning abruptly on
the sofa, as if some painful wound had been
touched to the quick. Faringhea obeyed.
After the lapse of some moments. Djalma broke
forth again with impatience, throwing aside the
tube of the hookah, and veiling both eyes with his
hands: "Your words are better than silence. Cursed