The Works of Lord Byron: Letters and Journals. Vol. 1
261 Pages
English

The Works of Lord Byron: Letters and Journals. Vol. 1

-

Downloading requires you to have access to the YouScribe library
Learn all about the services we offer

Description

The Project Gutenberg EBook of The Works Of Lord Byron, Letters and Journals, Vol. 1, by Lord Byron, Edited by Rowland E. Prothero Copyright laws are changing all over the world. Be sure to check the copyright laws for your country before downloading or redistributing this or any other Project Gutenberg eBook. This header should be the first thing seen when viewing this Project Gutenberg file. Please do not remove it. Do not change or edit the header without written permission. Please read the "legal small print," and other information about the eBook and Project Gutenberg at the bottom of this file. Included is important information about your specific rights and restrictions in how the file may be used. You can also find out about how to make a donation to Project Gutenberg, and how to get involved. **Welcome To The World of Free Plain Vanilla Electronic Texts** **eBooks Readable By Both Humans and By Computers, Since 1971** *****These eBooks Were Prepared By Thousands of Volunteers!***** Title: The Works Of Lord Byron, Letters and Journals, Vol. 1 Author: Lord Byron, Edited by Rowland E. Prothero Release Date: September, 2005 [EBook #8901] [Yes, we are more than one year ahead of schedule] [This file was first posted on August 22, 2003] Edition: 10 Language: English Character set encoding: ISO-8859-1 *** START OF THE PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK LETTERS AND JOURNALS, VOL.

Subjects

Informations

Published by
Published 08 December 2010
Reads 50
Language English

The Project Gutenberg EBook of The Works Of Lord Byron, Letters and
Journals, Vol. 1, by Lord Byron, Edited by Rowland E. Prothero
Copyright laws are changing all over the world. Be sure to check the
copyright laws for your country before downloading or redistributing
this or any other Project Gutenberg eBook.
This header should be the first thing seen when viewing this Project
Gutenberg file. Please do not remove it. Do not change or edit the
header without written permission.
Please read the "legal small print," and other information about the
eBook and Project Gutenberg at the bottom of this file. Included is
important information about your specific rights and restrictions in
how the file may be used. You can also find out about how to make a
donation to Project Gutenberg, and how to get involved.
**Welcome To The World of Free Plain Vanilla Electronic Texts**
**eBooks Readable By Both Humans and By Computers, Since 1971**
*****These eBooks Were Prepared By Thousands of Volunteers!*****
Title: The Works Of Lord Byron, Letters and Journals, Vol. 1
Author: Lord Byron, Edited by Rowland E. Prothero
Release Date: September, 2005 [EBook #8901]
[Yes, we are more than one year ahead of schedule]
[This file was first posted on August 22, 2003]
Edition: 10
Language: English
Character set encoding: ISO-8859-1
*** START OF THE PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK LETTERS AND JOURNALS, VOL. 1 ***
Produced by Distributed Proofreaders
Byron's Letter and Journals
Volume 1
Part of Byron's Works
a New, Revised and Enlarged Edition, with Illustrations.This volume edited by Rowland E. Prothero
1898
Table of Contents
Preface
List of Letters
Chapter I — Childhood and School
Chapter II — Cambridge and Juvenile Poems
Chapter III — English Bards and Scotch Reviewers
Chapter IV — Travels in Albania, Greece etc. — Death of Mrs. Byron
Appendix I — Review of Wordsworth's Poems
Appendix II — Article from the Edinburgh Review, For January, 1808
Appendix III — Review of Gell's Geography of Ithaca, and Itinerary Of Greece
Preface
Two great collections of Byron's letters have been already printed. In Moore's Life, which
appeared in 1830, 561 were given. These, in FitzGreene Halleck's American edition of Byron's
Works, published in 1847, were increased to 635. The first volume of a third collection, edited by
Mr. W. E. Henley, appeared early in 1897. A comparison of the number of letters contained in
these three collections down to August 22, 1811, shows that Moore prints 61, Halleck 78, and Mr.
Henley 88. In other words, the edition of 1897, which was the most complete so far as it goes,
added 27 letters to that of 1830, and 10 to that of 1847. But it should be remembered that by far
the greater part of the material added by Halleck and Mr. Henley was seen and rejected by
Moore.
The present edition, down to August 22, 1811, prints 168 letters, or an addition of 107 to Moore,
90 to Halleck, and 80 to Mr. Henley. Of this additional matter considerably more than two-thirds
was inaccessible to Moore in 1830.
In preparing this volume for the press, use has been also made of a mass of material, bearing
more or less directly on Byron's life, which was accumulated by the grandfather and father of Mr.
Murray. The notes thus contain, it is believed, many details of biographical interest, which are
now for the first time published.
It is necessary to make these comparisons, in order to define the position which this edition
claims to hold with regard to its predecessors. On the other hand, no one can regret more
sincerely than myself — no one has more cause to regret — the circumstances which placed this
wealth of new material in my hands rather than in those of the true poet and brilliant critic, who, to
enthusiasm for Byron, and wide acquaintance with the literature and social life of the day, adds
the rarer gift of giving life and significance to bygone events or trivial details by unconsciously
interesting his readers in his own living personality.
Byron's letters appeal on three special grounds to all lovers of English literature. They offer the
most suggestive commentary on his poetry; they give the truest portrait of the man; they possess,
at their best, in their ease, freshness, and racy vigour, a very high literary value.The present volume, which covers the period from 1798 to August, 1811, includes the letters
written Lord Byron from his eleventh to his twenty-third year. They therefore illustrate the
composition of his youthful poetry, of English Bards, and Scotch Reviewers, and of the first two
cantos of Childe Harold. They carry his history down to the eve of that morning in March, 1812,
when he awoke and found himself famous — in a degree and to an extent which to the present
generation seem almost incomprehensible.
If the letters were selected for their literary value alone, it is probable that very few of those
contained in the present volume would find a place in a collection formed on this principle. But
biographical interest also demands consideration, and, in the case of Byron, this claim is
peculiarly strong. He has for years suffered much from the suppression of the material on which a
just estimate of his life may be formed. It is difficult not to regret the destruction of the Memoirs, in
which he himself intended his history to be told. Their loss cannot be replaced; but their best
substitute is found in his letters. Through them a truer conception of Byron can be formed than
any impression which is derived from Dallas, Leigh Hunt, Medwin, or even Moore. It therefore
seems only fair to Byron, that they should be allowed, as far as possible, to interpret his career.
For other reasons also it appears to me too late, or too soon, to publish only those letters which
possess a high literary value. The real motive of such a selection would probably be misread,
and thus further misconceptions of Byron's character would be encouraged.
With one exception, therefore, the whole of the available material has been published. The
exception consists of some of the business letters written by Byron to his solicitor. Enough of
these have been printed to indicate the pecuniary difficulties which undoubtedly influenced his
life and character; but it was not considered necessary to publish the whole series. Men of genius
ask money from their lawyers in the same language, and with the same arguments, as the most
ordinary persons.
The picture which the letters give of Byron, is, it is believed, unique in its completeness, while the
portrait has the additional value of being painted by his own hand. Byron's career lends itself only
too easily to that method of treatment, which dashes off a likeness by vigorous strokes with a full
brush, seizing with false emphasis on some salient feature, and revelling in striking contrasts of
light and shade. But the style here adopted by the unconscious artist is rather that in which
Richardson the novelist painted his pathetic picture of Clarissa Harlowe. With slow, laborious
touches, with delicate gradations of colour, sometimes with almost tedious minuteness and
iteration, the gradual growth of a strangely composite character is presented, surrounded by the
influences which controlled or moulded its development, and traced through all the varieties of its
rapidly changing moods. Written, as Byron wrote, with habitual exaggeration, and on the impulse
of the moment, his letters correct one another, and, from this point of view, every letter contained
in the volume adds something to the truth and completeness of the portrait.
Round the central figure of Byron are grouped his relations and friends, and two of the most
interesting features in the volume are the strength of his family affections, and the width, if not the
depth, of his capacity for friendship. His father died when the child was only three years old. But a
bundle of his letters, written from Valenciennes to his sister, Mrs. Leigh, in 1790-91, still exists, to
attest, with startling plainness of speech, the strength of the tendencies which John Byron
transmitted to his son. The following extract contains the father's only allusion to the boy:-
"Valenciennes, Feb. 16, 1791.
Have you never received any letters from me by way of Bologne? I have sent two. For
God's sake send me some, as I have a great deal to pay. With regard to Mrs. Byron, I
am glad she writes to you. She is very amiable at a distance; but I defy you and all the
Apostles to live with her two months, for, if any body could live with her, it was me.
Mais jeu de Mains, jeu de Vilains. For my son, I am happy to hear he is well; but for
his walking, 'tis impossible, as he is club-footed.
Between his mother and himself, in spite of frequent and violent collisions, there existed a realaffection, while the warmth of his love for his half-sister Augusta, who had much of her brother's
power of winning affection, lost nothing in its permanence from the rarity of their personal
intercourse. Outside the family circle, the volume introduces the only two men among his
contemporaries who remained his lifelong friends. In his affection for Lord Clare, whom he very
rarely saw after leaving school, there was a tinge of romance, and in him Byron seems to have
personified the best memories of an idealized Harrow. In Hobhouse he found at once the truest
and the most intimate of his friends, a man whom he both liked and respected, and to whose
opinion and judgment he repeatedly deferred. On Hobhouse's side, the sentiment which induced
him, eminently sensible and practical as he was, to treasure the nosegay which Byron had given
him, long after it was withered, shows how attractive must have been the personality of the donor.
Without the Dictionary of National Biography, the labour of preparing the letters for the press
would be trebled. Both in the facts which it supplies, and in the sources of information which it
suggests, it is an invaluable aid.
In conclusion, I desire to express my special obligations to Lord Lovelace and Mr. Richard
Edgcumbe, who have read the greater part of the proofs, and to both of whom I am indebted for
several useful suggestions.
R. E. Prothero.
March, 1898.
Contents
List of Letters
number date address
1798
1 Nov. 8 To Mrs. Parker
1799
2 March 13 To his Mother
3 undated To John Hanson
1803
4 May 1 To his Mother
5 June 23 To his Mother
6 Sept. To his Mother
1804
7 March 22 To the Hon. Augusta Byron
8 March 26 To the Hon. Augusta Byron9 April 2 To the Hon. Augusta Byron
10 April 9 To the Hon. Augusta Byron
11 April 18 To the Hon. Augusta Byron
12 August 29 To Elizabeth Bridget Pigot
13 October 25 To the Hon. Augusta Byron
14 Nov. 2 To the Hon. Augusta Byron
15 Nov. 11 To the Hon. Augusta Byron
16 Nov. 17 To the Hon. Augusta Byron
17 Nov. 21 To the Hon. Augusta Byron
18 Dec. 1 To John Hanson
1805
19 Jan. 30 To the Hon. Augusta Byron
20 April 4 To the Hon. Augusta Byron
21 April 15 To Hargreaves Hanson
22 April 20 To Hargreaves Hanson
23 April 23 To the Hon. Augusta Byron
24 April 25 To the Hon. Augusta Byron
25 May 11 To John Hanson
26 June 5 To the Hon. Augusta Byron
27 June 27 To John Hanson
28 July 2 To the Hon. Augusta Byron
29 July 8 To John Hanson
30 August 4 To Charles O. Gordon
31 August 6 To the Hon. Augusta Byron
32 August 10 To the Hon. Augusta Byron
33 August 14 To Charles O. Gordon
34 August 19 To Hargreaves Hanson
35 undated To Hargreaves Hanson
36 Oct. 25 To Hargreaves Hanson
37 Oct. 26 To John Hanson
38 Nov. 6 To the Hon. Augusta Byron39 Nov. 12 To Hargreaves Hanson
40 Nov. 23 To John Hanson
41 Nov. 30 To John Hanson
42 Dec. 4 To John Hanson
43 Dec. 13 To John Hanson
44 Dec. 26 To the Hon. Augusta Byron
45 Dec. 27 To the Hon. Augusta Byron
1806
46 Jan. 7 To the Hon. Augusta Byron
47 Feb. 26 To his Mother
48 March 3 To John Hanson
49 March 10 To John Hanson
50 March 25 To John Hanson
51 May 16 To Henry Angelo
52 August 9 To John M.B. Pigot
53 August 10 To Elizabeth Bridget Pigot
54 August 10 To John M.B. Pigot
55 August 16 To John M.B. Pigot
56 August 18 To John M.B. Pigot
57 August 26 To John M.B. Pigot
58 undated To Elizabeth Bridget Pigot
59 Dec. 7 To John Hanson
1807
60 Jan. 12 To J. Ridge
61 Jan. 13 To John M. B. Pigot
62 Jan. 31 To Captain John Leacroft
63 Feb. 4 To Captain John Leacroft
64 Feb. 4 To Captain John Leacroft
65 Feb. 6 To the Earl of Clare
66 Feb. 8 To Mrs. Hanson
67 March 6 To William Bankes68 undated To William Bankes
69 undated To — — Falkner
70 April 2 To John Hanson
71 April To John M. B. Pigot
72 April 19 To John Hanson
73 June 11 To Elizabeth Bridget Pigot
74 June 30 To Elizabeth Bridget Pigot
75 July 5 To Elizabeth Bridget Pigot
76 July 13 To Elizabeth Bridget Pigot
77 July 20 To John Hanson
78 Aug. 2 To Elizabeth Bridget Pigot
79 Aug. 11 To Elizabeth Bridget Pigot
80 Oct. 19 To John Hanson
81 Oct. 26 To Elizabeth Bridget Pigot
82 Nov. 20 To J. Ridge
83 Dec. 2 To John Hanson
84 Nov. 9 (1820) To John Murray
1808
85 Jan. 13 To Henry Drury
86 Jan. 16 To John Cam Hobhouse
87 Jan. 20 To Robert Charles Dallas
88 Jan. 21 To Robert Charles Dallas
89 Jan. 25 To John Hanson
90 Jan. 25 To John Hanson
91 Feb. 2 To James De Bathe
92 Feb. 11 To William Harness
93 Feb. 21 To J. Ridge
94 Feb. 26 To the Rev. John Becher
95 March 28 To the Rev. John Becher
96 April 26 To the Hon. Augusta Leigh
97 Sept. 14 To the Rev. John Becher98 Sept. 18 To John Jackson
99 Oct. 4 To John Jackson
100 Oct. 7 To his Mother
101 Nov. 2 To his Mother
102 Nov. 3 To Francis Hodgson
103 Nov. 18 To John Hanson
104 Nov. 27 To Francis Hodgson
105 Nov. 30 To the Hon. Augusta Leigh
106 Dec. 14 To the Hon. Augusta Leigh
107 Dec. 17 To John Hanson
108 Dec. 17 To Francis Hodgson
1809
109 Jan. 15 To John Hanson
110 Jan. 25 To R. C. Dallas
111 Feb. 7 To R. C. Dallas
112 Feb. 11 To R. C. Dallas
113 Feb. 12 To R. C. Dallas
114 Feb. 16 To R. C. Dallas
115 Feb. 19 To R. C. Dallas
116 Feb. 22 To R. C. Dallas
117 March 6 To his Mother
118 March 18 To William Harness
119 undated To William Bankes
120 April 25 To R. C. Dallas
121 April 26 To John Hanson
122 May 15 To the Rev. R. Lowe
123 June 22 To his Mother
124 June 28 To the Rev. Henry Drury
125 June 25-30 To Francis Hodgson
126 July 16 To Francis Hodgson
127 August 6 To Francis Hodgson128 August 11 To his Mother
129 August 15 To Mr. Rushton
130 Sept. 15 To his Mother
131 Nov. 12 To his Mother
1810
132 March 19 To his Mother
133 April 9 To his Mother
134 April 10 To his Mother
135 April 17 To his Mother
136 May 3 To Henry Drury
137 May 5 To Francis Hodgson
138 May 18 To his Mother
139 May 24 To his Mother
140 June 17 To Henry Drury
141 June 28 To his Mother
142 July 1 To his Mother
143 July 4 To Francis Hodgson
144 July 25 To his Mother
145 July 27 To his Mother
146 July 30 To his Mother
147 Oct. 2 To his Mother
148 Oct. 3 To Francis Hodgson
149 Oct. 4 To John Cam Hobhouse
150 Nov. 14 To Francis Hodgson
1811
151 Jan. 14 To his Mother
152 Feb. 28 To his Mother
153 June 25 To his Mother
154 June 28 To R. C. Dallas
155 June 29 To Francis Hodgson
156 July 17 To Henry Drury157 July 23 To his Mother
158 July 30 To William Miller
159 Aug. 2 To John M. B. Pigot
160 Aug. 4 To John Hanson
161 Aug. 7 To Scrope Berdmore Davies
162 Aug. 12 To R. C. Dallas
163 Aug. 12 To — — Bolton
164 Aug. 16 To — — Bolton
165 Aug. 20 To — — Bolton
166 Aug. 21 To the Hon. Augusta Leigh
167 Aug. 21 To R. C. Dallas
168 Aug. 22 To Francis Hodgson
Chapter 1 — Childhood and School
1788—1805
Catherine Gordon of Gight (1765-1811), afterwards Mrs. Byron, and mother of the poet, was
descended on the paternal side from Sir William Gordon of Gight, the third son, by Annabella
Stewart, daughter of James I of Scotland, of George, second Earl of Huntly, Chancellor of
Scotland (1498-1502), and Lord-Lieutenant of the North from 1491 to his death in 1507. The
owners of Gight, now a ruin, once a feudal stronghold, were a hot-headed, hasty-handed race,
sufficiently notable to be commemorated by Thomas the Rhymer, and to leave their mark in the
traditions of Aberdeenshire. In the seventh generation from Sir William Gordon, the property
passed to an heiress, Mary Gordon. By her marriage with Alexander Davidson of Newton, who
assumed the name of Gordon, she had a son Alexander, Mrs. Byron's grandfather, who married
Margaret Duff of Craigston, a cousin of the first Earl of Fife. Their eldest son, George, the fifth of
the Gordons of Gight who bore that name, married Catherine Innes of Rosieburn, and by her
became the father of Catherine Gordon, born in 1765, afterwards Mrs. Byron. Both her parents
dying early, Catherine Gordon was brought up at Banff by her grandmother, commonly called
Lady Gight, a penurious, illiterate woman, who, however, was careful that her granddaughter was
better educated than herself. Thus, for the second time, Gight, which, with other property, was
worth between £23,000 and £24,000, passed to an heiress.
Miss Catherine Gordon had her full share of feminine vanity. At the age of thirty-five she was a
stout, dumpy, coarse-looking woman, awkward in her movements, provincial in her accent and
manner. But as her son was vain of his personal appearance, and especially of his hands, neck,
and ears, so she, when other charms had vanished, clung to her pride in her arms and hands.
She exhausted the patience of Stewartson the artist, who in 1806, after forty sittings, painted her