The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition Vol. 14 (of 25)

The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition Vol. 14 (of 25)

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The Project Gutenberg EBook of The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson Swanston Edition Vol. 14 (of 25), by Robert Louis Stevenson This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.net Title: The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition Vol. 14 (of 25) Author: Robert Louis Stevenson Other: Andrew Lang Release Date: December 12, 2009 [EBook #30659] Language: English Character set encoding: ISO-8859-1 *** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK WORKS OF R.L. STEVENSON V14 OF 25 *** Produced by Marius Masi, Jonathan Ingram and the Online Distributed Proofreading Team at http://www.pgdp.net THE WORKS OF ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON SWANSTON EDITION VOLUME XIV Of this SWANSTON EDITION in Twenty-five Volumes of the Works of ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON Two Thousand and Sixty Copies have been printed, of which only Two Thousand Copies are for sale. This is No. ............ ALISON CUNNINGHAM, R. L. S.’S NURSE THE WORKS OF ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON VOLUME FOURTEEN LONDON: PUBLISHED BY CHATTO AND WINDUS: IN ASSOCIATION WITH CASSELL AND COMPANY LIMITED: WILLIAM HEINEMANN: AND LONGMANS GREEN AND COMPANY MDCCCCXII ALL RIGHTS RESERVED CONTENTS A CHILD’S GARDEN OF VERSES PAGE I. BED IN SUMMER In winter I get up at night 3 3 4 4 5 II. A THOUGHT It is very nice to think III. AT THE SEA-SIDE When I was down beside the sea IV. YOUNG N IGHT THOUGHT All night long, and every night V. WHOLE D UTY OF C HILDREN A child should always say what’s true VI. R AIN The rain is raining all around 5 5 6 7 7 9 9 9 10 11 11 12 12 13 14 14 15 16 VII. PIRATE STORY Three of us afloat in the meadow by the swing VIII. FOREIGN LANDS Up into the cherry-tree IX. WINDY N IGHTS Whenever the moon and stars are set X. TRAVEL I should like to rise and go XI. SINGING Of speckled eggs the birdie sings XII. LOOKING FORWARD When I am grown to man’s estate XIII. A GOOD PLAY We built a ship upon the stairs XIV. WHERE GO THE BOATS? Dark brown is the river XV. AUNTIE’ S SKIRTS Whenever Auntie moves around XVI. THE LAND OF C OUNTERPANE When I was sick and lay a-bed XVII. THE LAND OF N OD From breakfast on all through the day XVIII. MY SHADOW I have a little shadow that goes in and out with me XIX. SYSTEM Every night my prayers I say XX. A GOOD BOY I woke before the morning, I was happy all the day XXI. ESCAPE AT BEDTIME The lights from the parlour and kitchen shone out XXII. MARCHING SONG Bring the comb and play upon it XXIII. THE C OW The friendly cow, all red and white XXIV. H APPY THOUGHT The world is so full of a number of things 16 16 17 18 19 20 20 21 22 22 23 23 24 24 25 26 26 XXV. THE WIND I saw you toss the kites on high XXVI. KEEPSAKE MILL Over the borders, a sin without pardon XXVII. GOOD AND BAD C HILDREN Children, you are very little XXVIII. FOREIGN C HILDREN Little Indian, Sioux or Crow XXIX. THE SUN’ S TRAVELS The sun is not a-bed when I XXX. THE LAMPLIGHTER My tea is nearly ready and the sun has left the sky XXXI. MY BED IS A BOAT My bed is like a little boat XXXII. THE MOON The moon has a face like the clock in the hall XXXIII. THE SWING How do you like to go up in a swing XXXIV. TIME TO R ISE A birdie with a yellow bill XXXV. LOOKING -GLASS R IVER Smooth it slides upon its travel XXXVI. FAIRY BREAD Come up here, O dusty feet XXXVII. FROM A R AILWAY C ARRIAGE Faster than fairies, faster than witches XXXVIII. WINTER-TIME Late lies the wintry sun a-bed XXXIX. THE H AYLOFT Through all the pleasant meadow-side XL. FAREWELL TO THE FARM The coach is at the door at last XLI. N ORTH-WEST PASSAGE 1. GOOD N IGHT When the bright lamp is carried in 27 27 28 28 2. SHADOW MARCH All round the house is the jet-black night 3. IN PORT Last, to the chamber where I lie THE CHILD ALONE I. THE U NSEEN PLAYMATE When children are playing alone on the green 31 32 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 II. MY SHIP AND I O it’s I that am the captain of a tidy little ship III. MY KINGDOM Down by a shining water well IV. PICTURE-BOOKS IN WINTER Summer fading, winter comes V. MY TREASURES These nuts, that I keep in the back of the nest VI. BLOCK C ITY What are you able to build with your blocks VII. THE LAND OF STORY-BOOKS At evening when the lamp is lit VIII. ARMIES IN THE FIRE The lamps now glitter down the street IX. THE LITTLE LAND When at home alone I sit GARDEN DAYS I. N IGHT AND D AY When the golden day is done 43 44 II. N EST EGGS Birds all the sunny day III. THE FLOWERS All the names I know from nurse 46 46 47 49 49 50 IV. SUMMER SUN Great is the sun, and wide he goes V. THE D UMB SOLDIER When the grass was closely mown VI. AUTUMN FIRES In the other gardens VII. THE GARDENER The gardener does not love to talk VIII. H ISTORICAL ASSOCIATIONS Dear Uncle Jim, this garden ground ENVOYS I. TO WILLIE AND H ENRIETTA If two may read aright 55 55 56 56 58 II. TO MY MOTHER You too, my mother, read my rhymes III. TO AUNTIE Chief of our aunts —not only I IV. TO MINNIE The red room with the giant bed V. TO MY N AME-C HILD Some day soon this rhyming volume, if you learn with proper speed VI. TO ANY R EADER As from the house your mother sees 59 UNDERWOODS BOOK I: IN ENGLISH I. ENVOY Go, little book, and wish to all 67 II. A SONG OF THE R OAD The gauger walked with willing foot 67 68 70 III. THE C ANOE SPEAKS On the great streams the ships may go IV. It is the season now to go V. THE H OUSE BEAUTIFUL A naked house, a naked moor 71 72 73 74 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 82 83 84 85 VI. A VISIT FROM THE SEA Far from the loud sea beaches VII. TO A GARDENER Friend, in my mountain-side demesne VIII. TO MINNIE A picture-frame for you to fill IX. TO K. DE M. A lover of the moorland bare X. TO N. V. DE G. S. The unfathomable sea, and time, and tears XI. TO WILL. H. LOW Youth now flees on feathered foot XII. TO MRS. WILL. H. LOW Even in the bluest noonday of July XIII. TO H. F. BROWN I sit and wait a pair of oars XIV. TO ANDREW LANG Dear Andrew, with the brindled hair XV. ET TU IN ARCADIA VIXISTI (TO R. A. M. S.) In ancient tales, O friend, thy spirit dwelt XVI. TO W. E. H ENLEY The year runs through her phases; rain and sun XVII. H ENRY JAMES Who comes to-night? We ope the doors in vain XVIII. THE MIRROR SPEAKS Where the bells peal far at sea XIX. KATHARINE We see you as we see a face XX. TO F. J. S. I read, dear friend, in your dear face 85 86 86 87 89 XXI. R EQUIEM Under the wide and starry sky XXII. THE C ELESTIAL SURGEON If I have faltered more or less XXIII. OUR LADY OF THE SNOWS Out of the sun, out of the blast XXIV. Not yet, my soul, these friendly fields desert XXV. It is not yours, O mother, to complain 90 92 93 93 94 95 96 Sing clearlier, Muse, or evermore be still XXVI. THE SICK C HILD O mother, lay your hand on my brow XXVII. IN MEMORIAM F. A. S. Yet, O stricken heart, remember, O remember XXVIII. TO MY FATHER Peace and her huge invasion to these shores XXIX. IN THE STATES With half a heart I wander here XXX. A PORTRAIT I am a kind of farthing dip XXXI. XXXII. A C AMP The bed was made, the room was fit 96 96 97 97 98 XXXIII. THE C OUNTRY OF THE C AMISARDS We travelled in the print of olden wars XXXIV. SKERRYVORE For love of lovely words, and for the sake XXXV. SKERRYVORE: THE PARALLEL Here all is sunny, and when the truant gull XXXVI. My house , I say. But hark to the sunny doves XXXVII. My body which my dungeon is 98 99 Say not of me that weakly I declined XXXVIII. BOOK II: IN SCOTS I. THE MAKER TO POSTERITY Far ’yont amang the years to be 105 106 109 II. ILLE TERRARUM Frae nirly, nippin’, Eas’lan’ breeze III. When aince Aprile has fairly come IV. A MILE AN’ A BITTOCK A mile an’ a bittock, a mile or twa 110 111 116 116 118 120 121 123 125 129 V. A LOWDEN SABBATH MORN The clinkum-clank o’ Sabbath bells VI. THE SPAEWIFE O, I wad like to ken—to the beggar-wife says I VII. THE BLAST—1875 It’s rainin’. Weet’s the gairden sod VIII. THE C OUNTERBLAST—1886 My bonny man, the warld, it’s true IX. THE C OUNTERBLAST IRONICAL It’s strange that God should fash to frame X. THEIR LAUREATE TO AN ACADEMY C LASS D INNER C LUB Dear Thamson class, whaure’er I gang XI. EMBRO H IE KIRK The Lord Himsel’ in former days XII. THE SCOTSMAN’ S R ETURN FROM ABROAD In mony a foreign pairt I’ve been XIII. Late In the night in bed I lay XIV. MY C ONSCIENCE! Of a’ the ills that flesh can fear 131