The Works of the Right Honourable Edmund Burke, Vol. 07 (of 12)
167 Pages
English
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The Works of the Right Honourable Edmund Burke, Vol. 07 (of 12)

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167 Pages
English

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The Project Gutenberg EBook of The Works of the Right Honourable Edmund Burke, Vol. VII. (of 12), by Edmund Burke This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.net Title: The Works of the Right Honourable Edmund Burke, Vol. VII. (of 12) Author: Edmund Burke Release Date: July 14, 2005 [EBook #16292] Language: English Character set encoding: UTF-8 *** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK EDMUND BURKE *** Produced by Paul Murray, Susan Skinner and the Online Distributed Proofreading Team from images generously made available by the Bibliotheque nationale de France (BnF/Gallica) at http://gallica.bnf.fr THE WORKS OF THE RIGHT HONOURABLE EDMUND BURKE IN TWELVE VOLUMES VOLUME THE SEVENTH London JOHN C. NIMMO 14, KING WILLIAM STREET, STRAND, W.C. MDCCCLXXXVII CONTENTS OF VOL. VII FRAGMENTS AND NOTES OF SPEECHES IN PARLIAMENT. SPEECH ON THE ACTS OF UNIFORMITY , February 6, 1772 3 SPEECH ON A BILL FOR THE RELIEF OF PROTESTANT DISSENTERS, March 7, 1773 21 SPEECH ON A MOTION FOR LEAVE TO BRING IN A BILL TO REPEAL AND ALTER CERTAIN ACTS RESPECTING RELIGIOUS OPINIONS, UPON THE OCCASION OF A PETITION OF THE UNITARIAN SOCIETY May 11, 1792 , 39 SPEECH RELATIVE TO THE MIDDLESEX ELECTION, February 7, 1771 59 SPEECH ON A BILL FOR SHORTENING THE DURATION OF PARLIAMENTS, May 8, 1780 69 SPEECH ON A MOTION FOR A COMMITTEE TO INQUIRE INTO THE STATE OF THE REPRESENTATION OF THE COMMONS IN PARLIAMENT, May 7, 1782 89 SPEECH ON A MOTION FOR LEAVE TO BRING IN A BILL FOR EXPLAINING THE POWERS OF JURIES IN PROSECUTIONS FOR LIBELS, March 7, 1771. TOGETHER WITH A LETTER IN VINDICATION OF THAT MEASURE, AND A COPY OF THE PROPOSED BILL 105 SPEECH ON A BILL FOR THE REPEAL OF THE MARRIAGE ACT, June 15, 1781 129 SPEECH ON A MOTION FOR LEAVE TO BRING IN A BILL TO QUIET THE POSSESSIONS OF THE SUBJECT AGAINST DORMANT CLAIMS OF THE CHURCH, February 17, 1772 137 HINTS FOR AN ESSAY ON THE DRAMA AN ESSAY TOWARDS AN ABRIDGMENT OF THE ENGLISH HISTORY . IN THREE BOOKS. 143 BOOK I. CHAP. Causes of the Connection between the Romans and Britons. 159 I. —Cæsar's two Invasions of Britain II. Some Account of the Ancient Inhabitants of Britain 170 III. Reduction of Britain by the Romans The 189 IV. Fall of the Roman Power in Britain The BOOK II. 214 CHAP. The Entry and Settlement of the Saxons, and their Conversion I. 227 to Christianity Establishment of Christianity—of Monastic Institutions —and 240 II. of their Effects Series of Anglo-Saxon Kings from Ethelbert to Alfred: with the III. 255 Invasion of the Danes IV. Reign of King Alfred 261 V. Succession of Kings from Alfred to Harold 269 Harold II.—Invasion of the Normans.—Account of that People,280 VI. and of the State of England at the Time of the Invasion VII. the Laws and Institutions of the Saxons Of 291 BOOK III. CHAP. View of the State of Europe at the Time of the Norman I. Invasion II. Reign of William the Conqueror III. Reign of William the Second, surnamed Rufus IV. Reign of Henry I V. Reign of Stephen VI. Reign of Henry II VII. Reign of Richard I VIII. Reign of John Fragment.—An Essay towards an History of the Laws of IX. England 327 335 364 375 386 394 425 437 475 {2} FRAGMENTS AND NOTES OF SPEECHES. During the period of Mr. Burke's Parliamentary labors, some alterations in the Acts of Uniformity, and the repeal of the Test and Corporation Acts, were agitated at various times in the House of Commons. It appears from the state of his manuscript papers, that he had designed to publish some of the Speeches which he delivered in those discussions, and with that view had preserved the following Fragments and detached Notes, which are now given to the public with as much order and connection as their imperfect condition renders them capable of receiving. The Speeches on the Middlesex Election, on shortening the Duration of Parliaments, on the Reform of the Representation in Parliament, on the Bill for explaining the Power of Juries in Prosecutions for libels, and on the Repeal of the Marriage Act, were found in the same imperfect state. {3} SPEECH ON THE ACTS OF UNIFORMITY FEBRUARY 6, 1772. {4} NOTE. The following Speech was occasioned by a petition to the House of Commons from certain clergymen of the Church of England, and certain of the two professions of Civil Law and Physic, and others, praying to be relieved from subscription to the Thirty-Nine Articles, as required by the Acts of Uniformity. The persona associated for this purpose were distinguished at the time by the name of "The Feathers Tavern Association," from the place where their meetings were usually held. Their petition was presented on the 6th of February, 1772; and on a motion that it should be brought up, the same was negatived on a division, in which Mr. Burke voted in the majority, by 217 against 71. {5} SPEECH. Mr. Speaker,—I should not trouble the House upon this question, if I could at all acquiesce in many of the arguments, or justify the vote I shall give upon several of the reasons which have been urged in favor of it. I should, indeed, be very much concerned, if I were thought to be influenced to that vote by those arguments. In particular, I do most exceedingly condemn all such arguments as involve any kind of reflection on the personal character of the gentlemen who have brought in a petition so decent in the style of it, and so constitutional in the mode. Besides the unimpeachable integrity and piety of many of the promoters of this petition, which render those aspersions as idle as they are unjust, such a way of treating the subject can have no other effect than to turn the attention of the House from the merits of the petition, the only thing properly before us, and which we are sufficiently competent to decide upon, to the motives of the petitioners, which belong exclusively to the Great Searcher of Hearts. We all know that those who loll at their ease in high dignities, whether of the Church or of the State, are commonly averse to all reformation. It is hard to persuade them that there can be anything amiss in establishments which by feeling experience they find to be so very comfortable. It is as true, that, from the same selfish motives, those who are struggling upwards are apt to find everything wrong and out of order. These are