The World
523 Pages
English

The World's Best Poetry, Volume 4 - The Higher Life

-

Downloading requires you to have access to the YouScribe library
Learn all about the services we offer

Description

Project Gutenberg's The World's Best Poetry Volume IV., by Bliss CarmanThis eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it,give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online atwww.gutenberg.netTitle: The World's Best Poetry Volume IV.Author: Bliss CarmanRelease Date: June 28, 2004 [EBook #12759]Language: English*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK THE WORLD'S BEST POETRY VOLUME IV. ***Produced by Charles Aldarondo, Leah Moser and the Online Distributed Proofreading Team.THE WORLD'S BEST POETRY I Home: Friendship II Love III Sorrow and Consolation IV The Higher Life V Nature VI Fancy Sentiment VII Descriptive: Narrative VIII National Spirit IX Tragedy: Humor X Poetical QuotationsTHE WORLD'S BEST POETRYIN TEN VOLUMES, ILLUSTRATEDEditor-in-ChiefBLISS CARMANAssociate EditorsJohn Vance CheneyCharles G.D. RobertsCharles F. RichardsonFrancis H. StoddardManaging EditorJohn R. Howard1904The World's Best PoetryVol. IVTHE HIGHER LIFERELIGION AND POETRYByWASHINGTON GLADDENNOTICE OF COPYRIGHTS.I.American poems in this volume within the legal protection of copyright are used by the courteous permission of theowners,—either the publishers named in the following list or the authors or their representatives in the subsequent one,—who reserve all their rights. So far as practicable, ...

Subjects

Informations

Published by
Published 08 December 2010
Reads 25
Language English

Project Gutenberg's The World's Best Poetry
Volume IV., by Bliss Carman
This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at
no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever.
You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the
terms of the Project Gutenberg License included
with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.net
Title: The World's Best Poetry Volume IV.
Author: Bliss Carman
Release Date: June 28, 2004 [EBook #12759]
Language: English
*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG
EBOOK THE WORLD'S BEST POETRY VOLUME
IV. ***
Produced by Charles Aldarondo, Leah Moser and
the Online Distributed Proofreading Team.THE WORLD'S BEST
POETRY
I Home: Friendship
II Love
III Sorrow and Consolation
IV The Higher Life
V Nature
VI Fancy Sentiment
VII Descriptive: Narrative
VIII National Spirit
IX Tragedy: Humor
X Poetical QuotationsTHE WORLD'S BEST POETRY
IN TEN VOLUMES, ILLUSTRATED
Editor-in-Chief
BLISS CARMAN
Associate Editors
John Vance Cheney
Charles G.D. Roberts
Charles F. Richardson
Francis H. Stoddard
Managing Editor
John R. Howard
1904
The World's Best Poetry
Vol. IVTHE HIGHER LIFE
RELIGION AND POETRY
By
WASHINGTON GLADDENNOTICE OF COPYRIGHTS.
I.
American poems in this volume within the legal
protection of copyright are used by the courteous
permission of the owners,—either the publishers
named in the following list or the authors or their
representatives in the subsequent one,—who
reserve all their rights. So far as practicable,
permission has been secured also for poems out of
copyright.
PUBLISHERS OF THE WORLD'S BEST POETRY.
1904.
Messrs. D. APPLETON & CO., New York.—W.G.
Bryant: "The Future
Life."
The ROBERT CLARKE COMPANY, Cincinnati.
—W.D. Gallagher: "The
Laborer."
Messrs. T.Y. CROWELL & CO., New York.—S.K.
Bolton: "Her Creed."
Messrs. E.P. DUTTON & CO., New York.—Ph.
Brooks: "O Little Town of
Bethlehem;" E. Sears: "The Angel's Song."Messrs. HOUGHTON, MIFFLIN & CO., Boston.
—Alice Cary: "My Creed;"
Phoebe Cary: "Nearer Home;" J.F. Clarke: "The
Caliph and Satan,"
"Cana;" R.W. Emerson: "Brahma," "Good-bye,"
"The Problem;" Louise
I. Guiney: "Tryste Noël;" J. Hay: "Religion and
Doctrine;" C.W.
Holmes: "The Living Temple;" H.W. Longfellow:
"King Robert of
Sicily," "Ladder of St. Augustine," "Psalm of Life,"
"Santa Filomena,"
"Sifting of Peter," "Song of the Silent Land," "To-
morrow;" S.
Longfellow: "Vesper Hymn;" J.R. Lowell: "Vision of
Sir Launfal;"
Frances P.L. Mace: "Only Waiting;" Caroline A.B.
Mason: "The
Voyage;" T. Parker: "The Higher Good," "The Way,
the Truth, and
the Life;" Eliza Scudder: "The Love of God,"
"Vesper Hymn;" E.C.
Stedman: "The Undiscovered Country;" Harriet B.
Stowe: "Knocking,
Ever Knocking," "The Other World;" J. Very: "Life,"
"The Spirit
Land;" J.G. Whittier: "The Eternal Goodness," "The
Meeting," "The
Two Angels," "The Two Rabbis;" Sarah C.
Woolsey: "When."
The J.B. LIPPINCOTT COMPANY, Philadelphia.
—Margaret J. Preston:
"Myrrh-Bearers."Messrs. LITTLE, BROWN & CO., Boston.—J.W.
Chadwick: "The Rise of
Man;" Emily Dickinson: "Found Wanting,"
"Heaven."
The LOTHROP PUBLISHING COMPANY, Boston.
—P.H. Hayne: "Patience."
Messrs. L.C. PAGE & CO., Boston.—C.G.D.
Roberts: "The Aim,"
"Ascription."
Messrs. SCOTT, FORESMAN & CO., Chicago.
—C.P. Taylor: "The Old
Village Choir."
Messrs. HERBERT S. STONE & CO., Chicago.
—G. Santayana: "Faith."
The YOUNG CHURCHMAN COMPANY,
Milwaukee.—A.C. Coxe: "The Chimes of
England."II.
American poems in this volume by the authors
whose names are given below are the copyrighted
property of the authors, or of their representatives
named in parenthesis, and may not be reprinted
without their permission, which for the present
work has been courteously granted.
PUBLISHERS OF THE WORLD'S BEST POETRY.
1904.
A. Coles (A. Coles, Jr., M.D.); J.A. Dix (Rev.
Morgan Dix, D.D.); P.L. Dunbar; W.C. Gannett; W.
Gladden; S.P. McL. Pratt; O. Huckel; Ray Palmer
(Dr. Charles R. Palmer); A.D.F. Randolph (Arthur
D.F. Randolph).RELIGION AND POETRY
BY WASHINGTON GLADDEN.
The time is not long past when the copulative in
that title might have suggested to some minds an
antithesis,—as acid and alkali, or heat and cold.
That religion could have affiliation with anything so
worldly as poetry would have seemed to some
pious people a questionable proposition. There
were the Psalms, in the Old Testament, to be sure;
and the minister had been heard to allude to them
as poetry: might not that indicate some heretical
taint in him, caught, perchance, from the "German
neologists" whose influence we were beginning to
dread? It did not seem quite orthodox to describe
the Psalms as poems; and when, a little later,
some one ventured to speak of the Book of Job as
a dramatic poem, there were many who were
simply horrified. Indeed, it was difficult for many
good people to consider the Biblical writings as in
any sense literature; they belonged in a category
by themselves, and the application to them of the
terms by which we describe similar writings in other
books appeared to many good men and women a
kind of profanation. This was not, of course, the
attitude of educated men and women, but
something akin to it affected large numbers of
excellent people.
We are well past that period, and the relations of