Things Mother Used to Make
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Things Mother Used to Make

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The Project Gutenberg EBook of Things Mother Used To Make, by Lydia Maria GurneyCopyright laws are changing all over the world. Be sure to check the copyright laws for your country beforedownloading or redistributing this or any other Project Gutenberg eBook.This header should be the first thing seen when viewing this Project Gutenberg file. Please do not remove it. Do notchange or edit the header without written permission.Please read the "legal small print," and other information about the eBook and Project Gutenberg at the bottom ofthis file. Included is important information about your specific rights and restrictions in how the file may be used. Youcan also find out about how to make a donation to Project Gutenberg, and how to get involved.**Welcome To The World of Free Plain Vanilla Electronic Texts****eBooks Readable By Both Humans and By Computers, Since 1971*******These eBooks Were Prepared By Thousands of Volunteers!*****Title: Things Mother Used To MakeAuthor: Lydia Maria GurneyRelease Date: July, 2005 [EBook #8542] [This file was first posted on July 21, 2003]Edition: 10Language: English*** START OF THE PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK, THINGS MOTHER USED TO MAKE ***E-text prepared by Joshua Hutchinson, Charles Franks, Juliet Sutherland, and the Online Distributed ProofreadingTeamTHINGS MOTHER USED TO MAKEBy LYDIA MARIA GURNEYA COLLECTION OF OLD TIME RECIPES, SOME NEARLY ONE HUNDRED YEARS OLD AND NEVER PUBLISHED BEFORENew York 1914AUTHOR'S ...

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The Project Gutenberg EBook of Things MotherUsed To Make, by Lydia Maria GurneyCopyright laws are changing all over the world. Besure to check the copyright laws for your countrybefore downloading or redistributing this or anyother Project Gutenberg eBook.This header should be the first thing seen whenviewing this Project Gutenberg file. Please do notremove it. Do not change or edit the headerwithout written permission.Please read the "legal small print," and otherinformation about the eBook and ProjectGutenberg at the bottom of this file. Included isimportant information about your specific rights andrestrictions in how the file may be used. You canalso find out about how to make a donation toProject Gutenberg, and how to get involved.**Welcome To The World of Free Plain VanillaElectronic Texts****eBooks Readable By Both Humans and ByComputers, Since 1971*******These eBooks Were Prepared By Thousandsof Volunteers!*****Title: Things Mother Used To Make
Author: Lydia Maria GurneyRelease Date: July, 2005 [EBook #8542] [This filewas first posted on July 21, 2003]Edition: 10Language: English*** START OF THE PROJECT GUTENBERGEBOOK, THINGS MOTHER USED TO MAKE ***E-text prepared by Joshua Hutchinson, CharlesFranks, Juliet Sutherland, and the OnlineDistributed Proofreading TeamTHINGS MOTHER USED TO MAKEBy LYDIA MARIA GURNEYA COLLECTION OF OLD TIME RECIPES, SOMENEARLY ONE HUNDRED YEARS OLD ANDNEVER PUBLISHED BEFORENew York 1914
AUTHOR'SFOREWORDGood food depends as largely upon the judgmentof the cook, as upon the materials used. Theserecipes and Household Hints are written veryplainly, for those who have had no experience, nopractice and possibly have little judgment.They are very simple, not expensive, and iffollowed closely, will ensure success. It is the hopeof the writer of this book that the young andinexperienced housekeeper may find it a real help.L.M. GURNEY.
INTRODUCTIONThe Things Mother Used To Make consist of oldfashioned recipes, which have been for the mostpart handed down by word of mouth from onegeneration to another, extending over a period ofnearly one hundred years. The author, a NewEngland woman, has during her life tested out inher own kitchen the greater part of these recipes,which represent the best cookery of those times.This material was originally published in SuburbanLife, where it obtained such recognition as seemedto warrant its preservation in book form. Theoriginal material has accordingly been amplified,and it is here presented as one of the volumes inthe series of Countryside Manuals.FRANK A. ARNOLDNEW YORKSeptember 15, 1913
=BREADS==Bannocks=1 Cupful of Thick Sour Milk 1/2 Cupful of Sugar 1Egg 2 Cupfuls of Flour 1/2 Cupful of Indian Meal 1Teaspoonful of Soda A pinch of SaltMake the mixture stiff enough to drop from aspoon. Drop mixture, size of a walnut, into boilingfat. Serve warm, with maple syrup.=Boston Brown Bread=1 Cupful of Rye Meal 1 Cupful of Graham Meal 1Cupful of Indian Meal 1 Cupful of Sweet Milk 1Cupful of Sour Milk 1 Cupful of Molasses 1Teaspoonful of Salt 1 Heaping Teaspoonful ofSodaStir the meals and salt together. Beat the soda intothe molasses until it foams; add sour milk, mix alltogether and pour into a tin pail which has beenwell greased, if you have no brown-bread steamer.Set the pail into a kettle of boiling water and steamthree or four hours, keeping it tightly covered.=Brown Bread (Baked)=
1 Cupful of Indian Meal 1 Cupful of Rye Meal 1/2Cupful of Flour 1 Cupful of Molasses (scant) 1Cupful of Milk or Water 1 Teaspoonful of SodaPut the meals and flour together. Stir soda intomolasses until it foams. Add salt and milk or water.Mix all together. Bake in a tin pail with cover on fortwo and a half hours.=Coffee Cakes=When your dough for yeast bread is risen light andfluffy, cut off small pieces and roll as big as yourfinger, four inches long. Fold and twist to twoinches long and fry in deep fat. Serve hot withcoffee.=Corn Meal Gems=2 Cupfuls of Flour 1 Cupful of Corn Meal (bolted isbest) 2 Cupfuls of Milk 2 Teaspoonfuls of Cream ofTartar 1 Teaspoonful of Baking Soda 1 Egg 1/2Cupful of Sugar 1/2 Teaspoonful of SaltStir the flour and meal together, adding cream oftartar, soda, salt and sugar. Beat the egg, add themilk to it, and stir into the other ingredients. Bakein a gem-pan twenty minutes.
=Cream of Tartar Biscuits=1 Pint of Flour 2 Teaspoonfuls of Cream of Tartar 1Teaspoonful of Soda 1/2 Teaspoonful of Salt 1Tablespoonful of LardStir cream of tartar, soda, salt and lard into theflour; mix with milk or water, handling as little aspossible. Roll and cut into rounds. Baking-powdercan be used in place of soda and cream of tartar.=Crullers=Use the recipe for doughnuts, adding one egg anda little more butter. Roll a small piece of the doughto the size of your finger, and eight inches long,double it, and twist the two rolls together. Fry inboiling fat.=Delicious Dip Toast=Cut slices of bread, one-half inch thick; toast eachside to a delicate brown. Dip these into hot, saltedmilk, letting them remain until soft. Lay them on aplatter and spread a little butter over each slice.Take one quart of milk more or less according tosize of family; heat in a double boiler, salt to taste.Wet two tablespoonfuls of flour with a little water;stir until smooth, and pour into the milk whenboiling. Make this of the consistency of rich cream;
add a piece of butter the size of a walnut, and pourover the toasted bread. Serve hot.=Doughnuts=1 Egg 1 Cupful of Milk 1 and 1/3 Cupfuls of Sugar2 Teaspoonfuls of Cream of Tartar 1 Teaspoonfulof Soda Piece of Butter the Size of a Walnut 1/4Teaspoonful of Cinnamon or Nutmeg Salt, andFlour enough to roll softBeat the egg and sugar together and add the milkand butter. Stir the soda and cream of tartar intothe flour, dry; mix all together, with the flour andsalt. Cut into rings and fry in deep fat. Lay them onbrown paper when you take them from the fat.=Fried Bread=After frying pork or bacon, put into the fat slices ofstale bread. As it fries, pour over each slice a littlemilk or water and salt to taste, turn and fry on theopposite side. This is a very appetizing dish.=German Toast=1 Cupful of Milk 1 Egg Pinch of Salt 4 or 5 Slices ofBreadBeat together one egg, one cupful of milk, and a
little salt. Dip slices of stale bread into this mixture,and fry on a griddle in butter or pork fat. Serve hotwith butter and maple syrup.=Soft Gingerbread=1 Cupful of Molasses 1 Cupful of Sour Milk 1/2Cupful of Butter or Lard 1 Teaspoonful of Ginger 1Teaspoonful of Soda 1/2 Teaspoonful of SaltStir the soda into the molasses until it foams, addsour milk, ginger, salt and melted butter. Last ofall, add flour enough for quite a stiff batter, andbake. This makes one sheet.=Huckleberry Cake=Pick over and wash and flour well one cupful offresh huckleberries.Add these to the batter for soft gingerbread. Servehot, with butter.=Quick Graham Bread=1 Pint of Graham Meal 1/2 Cupful of Molasses 1Cupful of Sour Milk 1 Teaspoonful of Soda 1Teaspoonful of SaltStir soda into the molasses, add sour milk and salt;add all to the meal, beating well. Sweet milk will do
with a little less soda. Bake thirty minutes, oraccording to heat of the oven. A moderate oven isbest.=Graham Bread (raised over night)=3 Cupfuls of Flour 3 Cupfuls of Graham Meal 3Tablespoonfuls of Sugar 1 Tablespoonful of Lard 1Teaspoonful of Salt 1 Yeast CakeMix flour and meal together and rub in lard, sugarand salt. Add yeast cake which has been dissolvedin one-half cup of cold water. Mix with warm waterat night. Set in a warm place to rise. In the morningstir and let rise to twice its bulk. Knead and put inbaking pans. Raise again and bake forty-fiveminutes.=Graham Muffins=1 Pint of Graham Flour 1/2 Cupful of Molasses 1Teaspoonful of Salt 1/2 Pint of White Flour 1Teaspoonful of SodaPut the salt into the flour and soda into themolasses. Stir all together and mix with milk orwater. Drop into muffin tins and bake twentyminutes.=Sour Milk Griddle Cakes=