This Giddy Globe
92 Pages
English
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This Giddy Globe

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92 Pages
English

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The Project Gutenberg EBook of This Giddy Globe, by Oliver HerfordThis eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and withalmost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away orre-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License includedwith this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.netTitle: This Giddy GlobeAuthor: Oliver HerfordRelease Date: July 14, 2008 [EBook #26053]Language: English*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK THIS GIDDY GLOBE ***Produced by Audrey Longhurst, Anne Storer and the OnlineDistributed Proofreading Team at http://www.pgdp.net (Thisfile was produced from images generously made availableby The Internet Archive/American Libraries.)Cover imageTHIS GIDDY GLOBE—————————————OLIVER HERFORDPETER SIMPLE F T GTHISGIDDY GLOBEBYPETER SIMPLE, F.T.G.FELLOW OF THE TERRESTRIAL GLOBE EDITED AND ILLUSTRATED BYOLIVER HERFORD, V. D. W. A.[“Very delightful wit and artist.”—Woodrow Wilson] logo NEW YORKGEORGE H. DORAN COMPANYCOPYRIGHT, 1919,BY GEORGE H. DORAN COMPANY PRINTED IN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICATOPRESIDENT WILSON[With all his faults he quotes me still.]PREFACE....................................................................................................................................................................................... [The Preface, which is strictly private and concernsonly ourselves and the Reader, has been removed toanother part of the book.]The ...

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The Project Gutenberg EBook of This Giddy Globe, byOliver Herford
This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at nocost and withalmost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it,give it away orre-use it under the terms of the Project GutenbergLicense includedwith this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.net
Title: This Giddy Globe
Author: Oliver Herford
Release Date: July 14, 2008 [EBook #26053]
Language: English
*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOKTHIS GIDDY GLOBE *** 
Produced by Audrey Longhurst, Anne Storer and theOnlineDistributed Proofreading Team at http://www.pgdp.net(Thisfile was produced from images generously made
file was produced from images generously madeavailableby The Internet Archive/American Libraries.)
Cover image
THIS GIDDY GLOBEOLIVER HERFORD
PETER SIMPLE F T G
THIS
GIDDY GLOBE
BY
PETER SIMPLE, F.T.G.
FELLOW OF THE TERRESTRIAL GLOBE
 
EDITED AND ILLUSTRATED BY
OLIVER HERFORD, V. D. W. A.
[“Very delightful wit and artist.”—Woodrow Wilson]
 
 
logo
 
 
NEW YORKGEORGE H. DORAN COMPANY
COPYRIGHT, 1919,BY GEORGE H. DORAN COMPANY
 
 
PRINTED IN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
TO
PRESIDENT WILSON
[With all his faults he quotes me still.]
PREFACE
.......................................................................................................................................................................................
 
 
[The Preface, which is strictly private and concernsonly ourselves and the Reader, has been removed toanother part of the book.]
The Author makes due Acknowledgment to CharlesScribner’s Sons for the use of certain verses, and toMiss Cecilia Loftus for her series of Perfect DayPictures.
CONTENTS
PART I: WHY IS THE GLOBE
page151920232528303235384447515254565861
chapterIThe CreationPrefaceIIA Long JumpIIIThe Giddy GlobeIVThe Use of the GlobeVThe EquatorVIThe Earth’s CrustVIIThe Temperature of the GlobeVIIIThe Age of the GlobeIXThe Face of the GlobeXClimate and WeatherXILand and WaterXIIThe Discovery of the WorldXIIIThe Habitable GlobeXIVThe TenantsXVRaceXVIGovernments of the GlobeXVIIThe Morals of the Giddy Globe PART II: THE COUNTRIES OF THE EARTHXVIIIThe PolesXIXAmericaXXBoston
657075
XXIThe United StatesXXIICanadaXXIIIGreat BritainXXIVScotlandXXVIrelandXXVIWales PART III: FOREIGN COUNTRIESXXVIISouth AmericaXXVIIIHollandXXIXBelgiumXXXFranceXXXIGermanyXXXIISwitzerlandXXXIIIMonacoXXXIVTurkeyXXXVRussiaXXXVINorway and SwedenXXXVIIAfricaXXXVIIIArabiaXXXIXAustraliaXLChinaXLIJapanXLIIEgypt, India, Italy, Spain, Greece, Etc.
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EpilogueAppendix
THIS GIDDY GLOBE
PART I
WHY IS THE GLOBE?
CHAPTER I
THE CREATION
Six busy days it took in allTo make a World and plan its fall,The seventh, SOMEONE said ’twas goodAnd rested, should you think he could?Knowing what the result would beThere would have been no rest for me!Claire Beecher Kummer.
136137
It takes much longer to write a Geography than,according to Moses, it took to create the World whichit is the Geographer’s business to describe; and sincethe Critic has been added to the list of created beings,it is no longer the fashion for the Author to passjudgment on his own work.
Let us imagine, however, that concealed in the cargo
of Hypothetic Nebula destined for the construction ofthe Terrestrial Globe was a Protoplasmic Stowawaythat sprang to being in the shape of a Critic just as thework of Creation was finished.
Would it not be interesting to speculate upon thatCritic’s reception of the freshly made World?
We may be sure that he would have found manythings not to his liking; technical defects such as thetreatment of grass and foliage in green instead of theproper purple; the tinting of the sky which anylandscape painter will tell you would be moredecorative done in turquoise green than cobalt blue.
Like the foolish Butterfly in the Talmud, who (toimpress Mrs. Butterfly) stamped his tiny foot upon thedome of King Solomon’s Temple, our Critic might havedeclared the World “Too flimsy in construction.” Hewould certainly have found fault with the Solar Systemand the Plumbing—the absence of heat in Winterwhen there is the greater need of it and the paucity ofmoisture in the desert places where it never rains.
The comicality of the Ape family might have provokeda reluctant smile, but much more likely a lecture onthe impropriety of descending to caricature in aserious work.
THE FIRST CALENDAR
The Creation of Heaven & Earthin Six dayes Gen: I
image
At best, our Critic would have pronounced the freshlymade World the work of a beginner, concedingperhaps that he “showed promise” and “might go far,”and if he wished to be very impressive indeed, hewould pretend that he had penetrated the veil ofAnonymity and hint darkly that he detected evidenttraces of a Feminine Touch!
In that, however, our Critic would only have beenanticipating, for is there not at this very moment onthe press a Suffrage edition (for women only) of theRubaiyat, in which one verse is amended to read thus
The ball no question makes of Ayes or Nos,But right or left, as strikes the Player goes,And SHE who tossed it down into the field,SHE knows about it all, SHE knows, SHE knows!
PREFACE
STRICTLY PRIVATE
For the Reader Only
Dear Reader:
This is foryou, and you only. We have concealed itbetween chapters one and two so that it will not meetany eye but yours.
We have a confession to make—it would be useless to
attempt concealment—we have the Digression habit.
We have tried every known remedy but we fear it isincurable.
All we ask, Gentle Reader, is that when we stray toofar you will favour us with a gentle reminder.
CHAPTER II
A LONG JUMP
 
image
It is a long jump from Moses, the author of the firstwork on Geography, to Peter Simple.
When the acrobatic reader has fetched his breath andlooks back at the fearsome list of Geographers he hasskipped—Strabo, Anaximander, Hecatœus,Demœritus, Eudoxus, Ephorus, Dicœarchus,Erastothenes, Polybius, Posidonius and Charles F.King,—he may well be thankful to find he has fallenupon his feet.
The Geographer’s task is endless.
The Planet he endeavours to portray is perpetuallychanging its appearance. After thousands andthousands of years, it is no nearer completion than itwas in the beginning.