Tom Burke Of "Ours", Volume II
692 Pages
English
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Tom Burke Of "Ours", Volume II

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692 Pages
English

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The Project Gutenberg EBook of Tom Burke Of "Ours", Volume II (of II), by Charles James LeverThis eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and withalmost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away orre-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License includedwith this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.orgTitle: Tom Burke Of "Ours", Volume II (of II)Author: Charles James LeverIllustrator: Phiz.Release Date: April 6, 2010 [EBook #31902]Language: English*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK TOM BURKE II ***Produced by David WidgerTOM BURKE OF "OURS"By Charles LeverWith Illustrations By Phiz. and H. BrowneIn Two Volumes, Vol. II.Transcriber's Note: Two print editions have been used for thisProject Gutenberg Edition of "Tom Burke of 'Ours'": The Little Brownedition (Boston) of 1913 with illustrations by Phiz; and the Chapmanand Hall editon (London) of 1853 with illustrations by Browne. Illegibleand missing pages were found in both print editions.DW VOLUME ONE frontispiece2titlepage2ContentsTOM BURKE OF "OURS"CHAPTER I. THE SICK LEAVECHAPTER II. LINTZCHAPTER III. AUSTERLITZCHAPTER IV. THE FIELD AT MIDNIGHTCHAPTER V. A MAÎTRE D'ARMESCHAPTER VI. THE MILL ON THE HOLITSCH ROADCHAPTER VII. THE ARMISTICECHAPTER VIII. THE COMPAGNIE D'ELITECHAPTER IX. PARIS IN 1800CHAPTER X. THE HÔTEL DE CLICHYCHAPTER XI. A SALLE DE POLICECHAPTER XII. THE RETURN OF THE WOUNDEDCHAPTER XIII. THE CHEVALIERCHAPTER XIV. A ...

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The Project Gutenberg EBook of Tom Burke Of
"Ours", Volume II (of II), by
Charles James Lever
This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no
cost and with
almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it,
give it away or
re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg
License included
with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.org
Title: Tom Burke Of "Ours", Volume II (of II)
Author: Charles James Lever
Illustrator: Phiz.
Release Date: April 6, 2010 [EBook #31902]
Language: English
*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK
TOM BURKE II ***
Produced by David WidgerTOM BURKE OF "OURS"
By Charles Lever
With Illustrations By Phiz. and H. Browne
In Two Volumes, Vol. II.
Transcriber's Note: Two print editions have been
used for this Project Gutenberg Edition of "Tom Burke
of 'Ours'": The Little Brown edition (Boston) of 1913
with illustrations by Phiz; and the Chapman and Hall
editon (London) of 1853 with illustrations by Browne.
Illegible and missing pages were found in both printeditions.
DW
VOLUME ONE
frontispiece2
titlepage2
Contents
TOM BURKE OF "OURS"
CHAPTER I. THE SICK LEAVE
CHAPTER II. LINTZ
CHAPTER III. AUSTERLITZ
CHAPTER IV. THE FIELD AT MIDNIGHT
CHAPTER V. A MAÎTRE D'ARMES
CHAPTER VI. THE MILL ON THE HOLITSCH ROAD
CHAPTER VII. THE ARMISTICE
CHAPTER VIII
THE COMPAGNIE D'ELITETHE COMPAGNIE D'ELITE
.
CHAPTER IX. PARIS IN 1800
CHAPTER X. THE HÔTEL DE CLICHY
CHAPTER XI. A SALLE DE POLICE
CHAPTER XII. THE RETURN OF THE WOUNDED
CHAPTER XIII
THE CHEVALIER
.
CHAPTER XIV
A BOYISH REMINISCENCE
.
CHAPTER XV. A GOOD-BY
CHAPTER XVI
AN OLD FRIEND UNCHANGED
.
CHAPTER XVI
THE RUE DES CAPUCINES
I.
CHAPTER XVI
THE MOISSON d'OR
II.
CHAPTER XIX
THE TWO SOIREES
.
CHAPTER XX. A SUDDEN DEPARTURE
CHAPTER XXI THE SUMMIT OF THE LANDGRAFEN
. BERG
CHAPTER XXI
L'HOMME ROUGE
I.
CHAPTER XXI
JENA AND AUERSTÄDT
I.
CHAPTER XXI A FRAGMENT OF A MAÎTRE d'ARME
V. S EXPERIENCES
CHAPTER XX
BERLIN AFTER "JENA."
V.
CHAPTER XX
A FOREST PATH
VI.CHAPTER XX
A CHANCE MEETING
VII.
CHAPTER XX THE PENSION DE LA RUE MI-CARÊ
VIII. ME
CHAPTER XXI
MY NAMESAKE
X.
CHAPTER XX
AN OLD SAILOR OF THE EMPIRE
X.
CHAPTER XX
A MOONLIGHT RECOGNITION
XI.
CHAPTER XX
THE FALAISE DE BIVILLE
XII.
CHAPTER XX
THE LANDING
XIII.
CHAPTER XX
A CHARACTER OF OLD DUBLIN
XIV.
CHAPTER XX
AN UNFORSEEN EVIL
XV.
CHAPTER XX
THE PERIL AVERTED
XVI.
CHAPTER XX
HASTY RESOLUTION
XVII.
CHAPTER XX
THE LAST CAMPAIGN
XVIII.
CHAPTER XX
THE BRIDGE OF MONTEREAU
XIX.
CHAPTER XL. FONTAINEBLEAU
CHAPTER XLI
THE CONCLUSION
.
A PARTING WORD.List of Illustrations
Browne: Murat and Minnette
Phiz: Bivwac After the Battle
Browne: Bivwac After the Battle
Phiz: Locomotive Chair
Browne: Locomotive Chair
Phiz: The Scrimmage
Phiz: The Dance
Phiz: Minnette Receives Cross of the Legion
Browne: Minnette Receives Cross of the Legion
Phiz: Minnette
Browne: The Drummer Boy
Phiz: Moisson
Phiz: A Slight MistakePhiz: Cut and Run
Phiz: The Big Drum
Browne: The Foraging Party
Phiz: The Summer House
Phiz: The Newsvendor
Phiz: There was Always a Sting in ye
Phiz: The Law Office
Brown: Darby in the Chair
Phiz: Minnette at the Bridge
Phiz: Death of Minnette
Browne: Death of Minnette
Browne: Parting from Napoleon
Browne: Henri BeauvaisTOM BURKE OF "OURS"
CHAPTER I. THE SICK LEAVE.
"What is it, Minette?" said I, for the third time, as I saw
her lean her head from out the narrow casement, and
look down into the valley beside the river; "what do
you see there?"
"I see a regiment of infantry coming along the road
from Ulm," said she, after a pause; "and now I
perceive the lancers are following them, and the
artillery too. Ah! and farther again, I see a great cloud
of dust. Mère de Ciél! how tired and weary they all
look! It surely cannot be a march in retreat; and, now
that I think of it, they have no baggage, nor any
wagons with them."
"That was a bugle call, Minette! Did you not hear it?"
"Yes, it's a halt for a few minutes. Poor fellows! they
are sadly exhausted; they cannot even reach the side
of the way, but are lying down on the very road. I can
bear it no longer. I must find out what it all means." So
saying, she threw round her a mantle which, Spanish
fashion, she wore over her head, and hurried from theroom.
For some time I waited patiently for her return; but
when half an hour elapsed, I arose and crept to the
window. A succession of rocky precipices descended
from the terrace on which the house stood, down to
the very edge of the Danube, and from the point
where I sat the view extended for miles in every
direction. What, then, was my astonishment to see the
wide plain, not marked by regular columns in marching
array, but covered with straggling detachments,
hurrying onward as if without order or discipline. Here
was an infantry battalion mixed up with a cavalry
corps, the foot-soldiers endeavoring to keep up with
the ambling trot of the dragoons; there, the
ammunition wagons were covered with weary soldiers,
too tired to march. Most of the men were without their
firelocks, which were piled in a confused heap on the
limbers of the guns. No merry chant, no burst of
warlike music, cheered them on. They seemed like the
scattered fragments of a routed army hurrying onward
in search of some place of refuge,-sad and spiritless.
"Can he have been beaten?" was the fearful thought
that flashed across me as I gazed. "Have the bold
legions that were never vanquished succumbed at
last? Oh, no, no! I'll not believe it." And while a glow of
fever warmed my whole blood, I buckled on my sabre,
and taking my shako, prepared to issue forth. Scarcely
had I reached the door, with tottering limbs, when I
saw Minette dashing up the steep street at the top
speed of her pony, while she flourished above her
head a great placard, and waved it to and fro.