Une fille du régent. English

Une fille du régent. English

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Project Gutenberg's The Regent's Daughter, by Alexandre Dumas (Pere)
This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with
almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or
re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included
with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.org
Title: The Regent's Daughter
Author: Alexandre Dumas (Pere)
Release Date: December 2, 2008 [EBook #27384]
Language: English
*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK THE REGENT'S DAUGHTER ***
Produced by Steven desJardins and the Online Distributed
Proofreading Team at http://www.pgdp.net
[Transcriber's Note: This text is taken from a nine-volume edition of the works of Alexandre Dumas, published in 1893 by
Peter Fenelon Collier. The Regent's Daughter was published in volume 6, along with The Forty-Five Guardsmen and
The Conspirators, both of which are also available from Project Gutenberg. The translator of these texts is unknown.
The use of accents in the original text was erratic, and some names appear with more than one spelling. Except where
one version was clearly predominant, all spellings are left as they appear in the original text.]
THE WORKS
OF
Alexandre Dumas
THE REGENT'S DAUGHTER
A SEQUEL TO "THE CONSPIRATORS"
Copiously Illustrated with elegant Pen and Ink and Wood Engravings,
specially drawn for this edition by eminent French and American Artists
COMPLETE IN NINE VOLUMES
VOLUME SIX
New York
PETER FENELON COLLIER, PUBLISHER
1893 THE REGENT'S ...

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Project Gutenberg's The Regent's Daughter, by
Alexandre Dumas (Pere)
This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no
cost and with
almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it,
give it away or
re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg
License included
with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.org
Title: The Regent's Daughter
Author: Alexandre Dumas (Pere)
Release Date: December 2, 2008 [EBook #27384]
Language: English
*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK
THE REGENT'S DAUGHTER ***
Produced by Steven desJardins and the Online
Distributed
Proofreading Team at http://www.pgdp.net[Transcriber's Note: This text is taken from a nine-
volume edition of the works of Alexandre Dumas,
published in 1893 by Peter Fenelon Collier. The
Regent's Daughter was published in volume 6, along
with The Forty-Five Guardsmen and The Conspirators,
both of which are also available from Project
Gutenberg. The translator of these texts is unknown.
The use of accents in the original text was erratic, and
some names appear with more than one spelling.
Except where one version was clearly predominant, all
spellings are left as they appear in the original text.]
THE WORKS
OF
Alexandre Dumas
THE REGENT'S
DAUGHTER
A SEQUEL TO "THE
CONSPIRATORS"Copiously Illustrated with elegant Pen and Ink and
Wood Engravings,
specially drawn for this edition by eminent French and
American Artists
COMPLETE IN NINE VOLUMES
VOLUME SIX
New York
PETER FENELON COLLIER, PUBLISHER
1893
THE REGENT'S DAUGHTER.
4
1
An Abbess of the Eighteenth Century 3
.
1
4
2
Decidedly the Family begins to settle down 3
.
5
4
3 What passed three Nights later at eight hundred L
3
. eagues from the Palais Royal
8
4
4 Showing how Chance arranges some Matters bett
4
. er than Providence
2
4
5
The Journey 4
.
4
4
6
A Room in the Hotel at Rambouillet 4A Room in the Hotel at Rambouillet 4
.
7
4
7 A Servant in the Royal Livery—Monseigneur le Du
4
. c d'Orleans
9
4
8
The Utility of a Seal 5
.
2
4
9
The Visit 5
.
5
1 In which Dubois proves that his Police was better o 4
0 rganized at an Expense of three hundred thousand 5
. Francs than the general Police for three Millions 9
1 4
1 Rambouillet again 6
. 1
1 4
2 Captain la Jonquiere 6
. 3
1 4
Monsieur Moutonnet, Draper at St. Germain-en-La
3 6
ye
. 6
1 4
4 Trust to Signs of Gratitude 6
. 8
1 4
5 His Excellency the Duc d'Orleans 7
. 1
1 4
6 "Monseigneur, we are Bretons" 7
. 41 4
7 Monsieur Andre 7
. 5
1 4
8 The Faubourg Saint Antoine 7
. 9
1 4
9 The Artist and the Politician 8
. 1
2 4
0 Blood reveals itself 8
. 4
2 4
What passed in the Rue du Bac while waiting for G
1 8
aston
. 8
2 5
2 In Bretagne 0
. 2
2 5
3 The Sorceress of Savernay 0
. 5
2 5
4 The Arrest 0
. 9
2 5
5 The Bastille 1
. 2
2 5
How Life passed in the Bastille while waiting for De
6 1
ath
. 6
2 5
How the Night passed in the Bastille while waiting f
7 1
or the Dayor the Day
. 9
2 5
8 A Companion in the Bastille 2
. 2
2 5
9 The Sentence 2
. 7
3 5
0 The Family Feud 3
. 1
3 5
1 State Affairs and Family Affairs 3
. 8
3 5
Showing that we must not always judge Others by
2 4
Ourselves
. 3
3 5
3 Monceaux 4
. 7
3 5
4 The Pardon 5
. 0
3 5
5 The last Interview 5
. 3
3 5
6 Nantes 5
. 5
3 5
7 The Tragedy of Nantes 6
. 0
3 58 The End 6
. 4
LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.
13.—Captain la Jonquiere.
14.—Philip V.
15.—Gaston rose hastily, and met D'Argenson with a
law officer.
16.—Abbe Brigaud.
17.—Mademoiselle de Launay.
18.—The Regent.
THE REGENT'S
DAUGHTER.
CHAPTER I.
AN ABBESS OF THE EIGHTEENTH
CENTURY.
On the 8th February, 1719, a carriage, bearing the
fleur-de-lis of France, with the motto of Orleans,
preceded by two outriders and a page, entered theporch of the Abbey of Chelles, precisely as the clock
struck ten, and, the door having been quickly opened,
its two occupants stepped out.
The first was a man of from forty-five to forty-six years
of age, short, and rather stout, with a high color, easy
in his movements, and displaying in every gesture a
certain air of high breeding and command.
The second, who followed slowly, was short, and
remarkably thin. His face, though not precisely ugly,
was very disagreeable, although bearing the
evidences of a keen intellect. He seemed to feel the
cold, and followed his companion, wrapped up in an
ample cloak.
The first of these two made his way up the staircase
with the air of a man well acquainted with the locality.
Passing through a large antechamber containing
several nuns, who bowed to the ground as he passed,
he ran rather than walked to a reception-room, which,
it must be confessed, bore but little trace of that
austerity which is ordinarily ascribed to the interior of a
cloister.
The other, who followed leisurely, was saluted almost
as humbly by the nuns.
"And now," said the first, "wait here and warm
yourself, while I go to her, and in ten minutes I will
make an end of all these abuses you mention: if she
deny, and I want proof, I will call you."
"Ten minutes, monseigneur," replied the man in the
cloak; "in two hours your highness will not have evenbroached the subject of your visit. Oh! the Abbess de
Chelles is a clever woman!"
So saying, he stretched himself out in an easy chair,
which he had drawn near the fire, and rested his thin
legs on the fender.
"Yes, yes," replied he who had been addressed as
"your highness;" "I know, and if I could forget it, you
take care to remind me of it often enough. Why did
you bring me here to-day through all this wind and
snow?"
"Because you would not come yesterday,
monseigneur."
"Yesterday, it was impossible; I had an appointment
with Lord Stair at five o'clock."
"In a house in the Rue des Bons Enfants. My lord
does not live any longer, then, at the English
embassy?"
"Abbe, I had forbidden you to follow me."
"Monseigneur, it is my duty to disobey you."
"Well, then, disobey; but let me tell stories at my
pleasure, without your having the impertinence to
show me that you know it, just for the sake of proving
the efficiency of your police."
"Monseigneur may rest easy in future—I will believe
anything!"