What to See in England - A Guide to Places of Historic Interest, Natural Beauty or Literary Association
105 Pages
English
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What to See in England - A Guide to Places of Historic Interest, Natural Beauty or Literary Association

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105 Pages
English

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The Project Gutenberg eBook, What to See in England, by Gordon HomeThis eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it,give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online atwww.gutenberg.netTitle: What to See in EnglandAuthor: Gordon HomeRelease Date: March 19, 2004 [eBook #11642]Language: English***START OF THE PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK WHAT TO SEE IN ENGLAND***E-text prepared by Ted Garvin, Linda Cantoni, and Project Gutenberg Distributed ProofreadersWHAT TO SEE IN ENGLANDA GUIDE TO PLACES OF HISTORIC INTEREST, NATURAL BEAUTY, OR LITERARY ASSOCIATIONBY GORDON HOME1908[Illustration: BOOTHAM BAR, AND YORK MINSTER.][Illustration: SKETCH PLAN OF LONDON SHOWING RAILWAY STATIONS][Illustration: REFERENCE TO RAILWAY STATIONSBroad StreetCannon St. (South Eastern & Chatham)Charing Cross (South Eastern & Chatham)Euston Station (London & North Western)Fenchurch St. (London, Tilbury, & Southend)Great Central StationGreat Eastern (Liverpool St.)Great Western StationKing's Cross (Great Northern)Liverpool St. (Great Eastern)London Bridge (South Eastern & Chatham & Brighton & South Coast)London & North Western (Euston Station)London & South Western (Waterloo)London, Tilbury, & Southend (Fenchurch St.)Marylebone Station (Great Central)Paddington Station (Great Western)St Pancras (Midland)South Eastern & Chatham: Cannon Street ...

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The Project Gutenberg eBook, What to See in England, by Gordon Home This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.net Title: What to See in England Author: Gordon Home Release Date: March 19, 2004 [eBook #11642] Language: English ***START OF THE PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK WHAT TO SEE IN ENGLAND*** E-text prepared by Ted Garvin, Linda Cantoni, and Project Gutenberg Distributed Proofreaders WHAT TO SEE IN ENGLAND A GUIDE TO PLACES OF HISTORIC INTEREST, NATURAL BEAUTY, OR LITERARY ASSOCIATION BY GORDON HOME 1908 [Illustration: BOOTHAM BAR, AND YORK MINSTER.] [Illustration: SKETCH PLAN OF LONDON SHOWING RAILWAY STATIONS] [Illustration: REFERENCE TO RAILWAY STATIONS Broad Street Cannon St. (South Eastern & Chatham) Charing Cross (South Eastern & Chatham) Euston Station (London & North Western) Fenchurch St. (London, Tilbury, & Southend) Great Central Station Great Eastern (Liverpool St.) Great Western Station King's Cross (Great Northern) Liverpool St. (Great Eastern) London Bridge (South Eastern & Chatham & Brighton & South Coast) London & North Western (Euston Station) London & South Western (Waterloo) London, Tilbury, & Southend (Fenchurch St.) Marylebone Station (Great Central) Paddington Station (Great Western) St Pancras (Midland) South Eastern & Chatham: Cannon Street Charing Cross Holborn Viaduct London Bridge Ludgate Hill Victoria Waterloo South Western Railway (Waterloo) Victoria (London, Brighton, & South Coast & South Eastern & Chatham) Waterloo (London & South Western)] PREFACE This book is intended to put in the smallest possible space the means by which one may reach the chief places of interest in England and Wales. It will possibly make many holidays, week-ends, or isolated days more enjoyable by placing a defined objective before the rambler. Places within an hour or two of London are in the front of the book, so that as one turns over the pages one is taken further and further afield. The brief summary of the interests of each place, and the many illustrations, may help to memorise the impressions obtained. The first edition of a book of this nature must of necessity be incomplete, and the author is prepared to hear of long lists of places which should have been included, and also to hear criticisms on his choice of those appearing. It is to some extent natural that special familiarity with certain places and certain writers or heroes of the past may distort one's vision, and perhaps induce a choice of subjects which may not seem so comprehensive to some individuals as to others. Future editions will, however, give ample scope for embracing all the good suggestions which may be made. G.H. HAM HOUSE AND PETERSHAM =How to get there.=—Train from Waterloo. L. and S.W. Railway. =Nearest Station.=—Richmond (1-1/4 miles from Petersham Church). =Distance from London.=—10 miles. =Average Time.=—1/2 hour. 1st 2nd 3rd =Fares.=—Single 1s. 3d. 1s. 0d. 0s. 9d. Return 2s. 0d. 1s. 6d. 1s. 3d. =Accommodation Obtainable.=—"Castle Hotel," "Roebuck Hotel," Richmond. "Dysart Arms" at Petersham. The little church at Petersham is interesting on account of the memorial it contains to the memory of Vancouver, the discoverer, in 1792, of the island bearing his name, on the west coast of the North American continent. It is said that "the unceasing exertions which Vancouver himself made to complete the gigantic task of surveying 9000 miles of unknown and intricate coasts—a labour chiefly performed in open boats—made an inroad on his constitution from which he never recovered, and, declining gradually, he died in May 1798." The church is also the burying-place of the Duchess of Lauderdale, whose residence was Ham House. This fine old Jacobean mansion stands at no great distance from Petersham Church. It was built as a residence for Prince Henry, the eldest son of James I., who, however, died early, the gossips of the time hinting at poison. The house is still said to be haunted by the spirit of the old Duchess of Lauderdale, who lived in the time of Charles II. WALTON-ON-THAMES (SCOLD'S BRIDLE) =How to get there.=—Train from Waterloo. L. and S.W. Railway. =Nearest Station.=—Walton. =Distance from London.=—17 miles. =Average Time.=—3/4 hour. 1st 2nd 3rd =Fares.=—Single 2s. 10d. 1s. 10d. 1s. 5d. Return 4s. 0d. 3s. 0d. 2s. 6d. =Accommodation Obtainable.=—"Ashley" at station; "Swan," on the river; "Duke's Head," in the town, etc. Walton-on-Thames is a little riverside town, very much surrounded by modern villas. The church contains in a glass case in the vestry a "scold's bridle." This rusty iron contrivance is one of the few specimens of this mediaeval instrument of torture to be seen in this country, and it is certainly the nearest to London. In Elizabethan times a "scold" was looked upon in much the same light as a witch, and this bridle was applied to those women who obtained for themselves the undesirable reputation. [Illustration: THE GARDEN FRONT OF HAM HOUSE.] [Illustration: THE SCOLD'S BRIDLE IN WALTON-ON-THAMES CHURCH. "Chester presents Walton with a bridle To curb women's tongues when they are idle."] HARROW =How to get there.=—Train from Euston. L. and N.W. Railway. =Nearest Station.=—Harrow. =Distance from London.=—11-1/2 miles. =Average Time.=—1/2 hour. 1st 2nd 3rd =Fares.=—Single 1s. 6d. 1s. 0d. 0s. 9d. Return 2s. 3d. 1s. 6d. 1s. 0d. =Accommodation Obtainable.=—"King's Head," etc. =Alternative Routes.=—Train from Baker Street, Metropolitan Railway. Train from Broad Street, L. and N.W. Railway. Train from Marylebone, Great Central Railway. Harrow, from its high position, 200 feet above the sea, was selected by the Romans as an important military station. By the Saxons it was called Hereways, and was purchased in 822 by Wilfred, Archbishop of Canterbury. The ancient manor- house, of which no traces now remain, was formerly the residence of the Archbishops of Canterbury, and it was here that Thomas à Becket resided during his banishment from Court. Cardinal Wolsey, who was once Rector of Harrow, resided at Pinner, and is said to have entertained Henry VIII. during his visit to Harrow. The manor was exchanged by Archbishop Cranmer with the king for other lands, and was subsequently given to Sir Edmund Dudley, afterwards Lord North. At the bottom of the hill, and spreading rapidly in all directions, are quantities of modern houses and villas, but the point of greatest interest in Harrow is the celebrated school, wonderfully situated on the very summit of the hill, with views extending over thirteen counties. Founded in the reign of Queen Elizabeth by John Lyon, a yeoman of the parish, the school has now grown enormously, the oldest portion being that near the church, which was erected three years after the founder's death. In the wainscotting of the famous schoolroom are the carvings cut by many generations of Harrovians, among them being the names of Peel, Byron, Sheridan, the Marquess of Hastings, Lord Normanby, and many others. The church stands on the extreme summit of the hill, and from the churchyard the view is simply magnificent. In the building are some interesting tombs and brasses, and a monument to John Lyon, the founder of the school. The grave shown on the opposite page is known as "Byron's tomb," on account of his fondness for