White Slaves; or, the Oppression of the Worthy Poor
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White Slaves; or, the Oppression of the Worthy Poor

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**Welcome To The World of Free Plain Vanilla Electronic Texts**
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Title: White Slaves
Author: Louis A Banks
Release Date: November, 2004 [EBook #6802] [Yes, we are more than one year ahead of schedule] [This file was first
posted on January 26, 2003]
Edition: 10
Language: English
*** START OF THE PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK WHITE SLAVES ***
Produced by Steve Schulze, Charles Franks and the Online Distributed Proofreading Team. This file was produced from
images generously made available by the CWRU Preservation Department Digital Library
WHITE SLAVES
OR
THE OPPRESSIONS OF THE WORTHY POOR
BY REV. LOUIS ALBERT BANKS, D.D ...

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Published 08 December 2010
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The Project Gutenberg EBook of White Slaves, byLouis A BanksCopyright laws are changing all over the world. Besure to check the copyright laws for your countrybefore downloading or redistributing this or anyother Project Gutenberg eBook.This header should be the first thing seen whenviewing this Project Gutenberg file. Please do notremove it. Do not change or edit the headerwithout written permission.Please read the "legal small print," and otherinformation about the eBook and ProjectGutenberg at the bottom of this file. Included isimportant information about your specific rights andrestrictions in how the file may be used. You canalso find out about how to make a donation toProject Gutenberg, and how to get involved.**Welcome To The World of Free Plain VanillaElectronic Texts****eBooks Readable By Both Humans and ByComputers, Since 1971*******These eBooks Were Prepared By Thousandsof Volunteers!*****Title: White Slaves
Author: Louis A BanksRelease Date: November, 2004 [EBook #6802][Yes, we are more than one year ahead ofschedule] [This file was first posted on January 26,2003]Edition: 10Language: English*** START OF THE PROJECT GUTENBERGEBOOK WHITE SLAVES ***Produced by Steve Schulze, Charles Franks andthe Online Distributed Proofreading Team. This filewas produced from images generously madeavailable by the CWRU Preservation DepartmentDigital LibraryWHITE SLAVES
ORTHE OPPRESSIONS OF THE WORTHY POORBY REV. LOUIS ALBERT BANKS, D.D.To My Father and Mother,Who instilled into my mind and heart, in the days ofa happy boyhood, their own love for liberty andhatred of oppression, this volume is gratefullydedicated.
TO THE MERCY AND HELPDEPARTMENT OF THEEPWORTH LEAGUEMr. Edison tells us that ninety per cent of theenergy that there is in coal is lost in the presentmethod of converting it into a usable force. May I,without being considered a croaker, say thatalmost the same amount of spiritual power goes towaste in our average church life? One is startled attimes as he notes the manifestations of fervor andwarmth in the devotional meetings of the presentday, and the meagre results that follow in thetransformation of society into the likeness of thekingdom of heaven. Exactly what we have to do,however, is to help hasten the answer to theprayer our Lord taught us, "Thy will be done onearth as it is in heaven," and not to be foreverseeking to build tabernacles on some Mount ofTransfiguration.This book of Dr. Banks's is a positive stimulus tothis work of social transformation. The young menand women of our Epworth League could not dobetter than to carefully and thoughtfully study itsvivid pictures of every-day scenes in our great, andeven in our lesser, cities.Such study will open their eyes to sad deformitiesin their own communities, to which too many havebecome strangely indifferent through custom and
wont. True, it is not pleasant to consider thesedistressing matters; but is it the business of theChristian to avoid that which is unpleasant?Consideration leads to sympathy, and sympathywonderfully quickens the inventive faculties; andthe aroused intellect and active affection areleavening forces that alter social conditions alwaysfor the better.I take great pleasure, therefore, in commendingthis work, because it stirs all who read it. It maymake you indignant. What of it? Would that morewere alive enough to be indignant with theindignation of our Lord at the forces ofunbrotherliness at work in our midst! It will do morethan rouse your indignation; it will help you to utterthe prayer that gave the accent to the life of Paul:"Lord, what wilt thou have me to do?" When inworks of Mercy and Help our tens of thousands ofEpworth Leaguers are loyally living this prayer, theproblem of Edison, as applied to spiritual dynamics,will be solved, and the latent forces of spiritualenergy used to their utmost. Then, as slavery haspassed away, war and tyranny and idleness andpoverty will be no more, and the end to whichChrist leads us, and for which He died, will beattained.WILLIAM INGRAHAM HAVEN,Vice-President for Mercy and Help Department.INWOOD LODGE, PINE ISLAND N.H. August
1893
AUTHOR'S PREFACEThis volume had its origin in experiences whichcame to me in the daily duties of a city pastorate.The inadequate wages received by some of themembers of my own congregation, and theimpoverished and unhealthy surroundings of manyof the poor people who came for me to christentheir children, pray with their sick, or bury theirdead, so aroused my sympathy for the victims, andmy indignation against the cruel or indifferentcauses of their misery, that I determined upon athorough and systematic investigation of theconditions of life among the worthy Boston poor.By the word "worthy" I do not mean to indicate aclass of saints, but the poor people of the city whoare willing and anxious to exchange honest hardwork for their support. I have not, in the series ofstudies here presented, entered into a discussionof the vicious and criminal classes. I have tried toperform, as it seemed to me, a far more importanttask—to make a plea for justice on behalf of thecrushed, and often forgotten, victims of greed, whowork and starve in their cellars and garrets ratherthan beg or steal.The larger part of the matter contained in thesepages was originally delivered in a series ofdiscourses from the pulpit of St. John's MethodistEpiscopal Church, South Boston, and retains herethe direct form of the spoken address.
I desire to make a personal acknowledgment tosome who have given me great assistance inmaking the investigations, the results of which arehere recorded. I am greatly indebted to Mr. B. O.Flower, Editor of The Arena, for many kindnesses,and especially for the use of several interestingillustrations originally prepared for the magazineover which he so ably and gracefully presides. TheRev. Walter J. Swaffield, of the Boston BaptistBethel, the Rev. C. L. D. Younkin, of the North EndMission, the Rev. Geo. L. Small, of the Mariners'House, the Rev. John G. May, of the ItalianMission, and that indefatigable reformer, Mrs. AliceN. Lincoln, have each put me under greatobligations by their unwearying kindness and willingassistance. I am also greatly indebted to Mr. SearsGallagher, the brilliant young South Boston artist,and to the veteran photographer of BostonHighlands, Mr. W. H. Partridge, for manycourtesies in connection with the illustrations whichillumine these chapters.LOUIS ALBERT BANKS. BOSTON, September 15,1891.CONTENTSI. THE WHITE SLAVES OF THE BOSTON"SWEATERS"II. LETTER OF CRITICISM
III. REPLY TO A CRITICISM ON "THE WHITESLAVES OF THE BOSTON SWEATERS"IV. THE PLAGUE OF THE SWEAT-SHOPV. THE RELATION OF WAGES TO MORALSVI. THE WAGES AND TEMPTATIONS OFWORKING-PEOPLEVII. BOSTON'S UNCLE TOM'S CABINVIII. SOCIAL MICROBES IN BOSTONTENEMENT HOUSES, AND HOW TO DESTROYTHEMIX. OLD WORLD TIDES IN BOSTONX. OUR BROTHERS AND SISTERS, THEBOSTON PAUPERSXI. COMMENT ON "OUR BROTHERS ANDSISTERS, THE BOSTON PAUPERS"XII. THE GOLD GOD OF MODERN SOCIETYLIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS
PORTRAIT OF AUTHOR PORTUGUESE WIDOWIN ATTIC PORTUGUESE WIDOW ANDCHILDREN LITTLE CHILDREN FINISHINGPANTS INVALID IN CHAIR POSTAL UNIFORMSA TENEMENT-HOUSE COURT SUNDAY ONNORTH STREET CLARK'S MISSION NORTHEND JUNK SHOP HOME OF THE MATHERS THEPEANUTTER INSIDE A SWEAT-SHOP PAULREVERE HOUSE, NORTH SQUARE REAR OFNORTH END TENEMENT HOUSECOMMONWEALTH AVENUE DRYING "THEFIND" THE NORTH END MISSION A BOSTON"BRIDGE OF SIGHS" COURT OFF NORTHSTREET CELLARWAY LEADING TOUNDERGROUND APARTMENTS SICK MAN INUNDERGROUND APARTMENT AN ANCIENTTENEMENT ITALIAN FRUIT-VENDERS AT HOMECOCKROACHES BY FLASH-LIGHT BANANASELLER UNDERGROUND TENEMENT WITHTWO BEDS TWO O'CLOCK IN THE MORNINGEXTERIOR OF A NORTH END TENEMENTHOUSE WIDOW AND TWO CHILDREN INUNDERGROUND TENEMENT THE BANK OFTHE UNFORTUNATE OUT OF WORK A CHEAPLODGING-HOUSE THE "GOOD LUCK"TENEMENT HOUSE THE SAND GARDENCHRIST CHURCH TOWER ON THE CUNARDERON THE WAY TO THE RABBI PASSING THEQUARANTINE DOCTOR SURGICAL THEOLOGYBUILDING USED BY THE BRITISH AS AHOSPITAL VICTORIA SQUARE OAK DOOR ATENTRANCE READING-ROOM AT FACTORYFERRIS BROTHERS' CORSET FACTORY