Wigwam Evenings - Sioux Folk Tales Retold
77 Pages
English
Downloading requires you to have access to the YouScribe library
Learn all about the services we offer

Wigwam Evenings - Sioux Folk Tales Retold

-

Downloading requires you to have access to the YouScribe library
Learn all about the services we offer
77 Pages
English

Informations

Published by
Published 08 December 2010
Reads 30
Language English
Document size 1 MB

Exrait

The Project Gutenberg eBook of Wigwam Evenings, by Charles Alexander Eastman and Elaine Goodale Eastman
This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online atwww.gutenberg.org Title: Wigwam Evenings Sioux Folk Tales Retold Author: Charles Alexander Eastman and Elaine Goodale Eastman Release Date: February 16, 2009 [eBook #28099] Language: English Character set encoding: ISO-8859-1 ***START OF THE PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK WIGWAM EVENINGS***  
 
    
E-text prepared by D. Alexander, Meredith Bach, the Carbon County Public Library (Rawlins, Wyoming), and the Project Gutenberg Online Distributed Proofreading Team (http://www.pgdp.net)
WIGWAM EVENINGS
SIOUX FOLK TALES RETOLD
 
 
  
  
 
 
BY CHARLES A. EASTMAN (Ohiyesa) AND ELAINE GOODALE EASTMAN
Illustrated by Edwin Willard Deming
BOSTON LITTLE, BROWN, AND COMPANY 1928
Copyright, 1909, BYLITTLE, BROWN,ANDCOMPANY
All rights reserved
PRINTED IN THEUNITEDSTATES OFAMERICA
  
 
THE STRANGER WATCHES THE LAUGH-MAKER AND THE BEARS. [FRONTISPIECE.Seepage 189
BOOKS BY CHARLES A. EASTMAN
INDIANBOYHOOD FROM THEDEEPWOODS TO CIVILIZATION OLDINDIANDAYS INDIANSCOUTTALKS INDIANHEROES ANDGREAT CHIEFTAINS
   
In Collaboration with ELAINE G. EASTMAN
WIGWAMEVENINGS
NOTE
The authors wish to acknowledge the courtesy of The Ladies' Home Journal, Good Housekeeping, and The Woman's Home Companion, in giving permission to include in this volume several stories which first appeared in their pages.   
PREFACE
These scattered leaves from the unwritten school-book of the wilderness have been gathered together for the children of to-day; both as a slight contribution to the treasures of aboriginal folk-lore, and with the special purpose of adapting them to the demands of the American school and fireside. That is to say, we have chosen from a mass of material the shorter and simpler stories and parts of stories, and have not always insisted upon a literal rendering, but taken such occasional liberties with the originals as seemed necessary to fit them to the exigencies of an unlike tongue and to the sympathies of an alien race. Nevertheless, we hope and think that we have been able to preserve in the main the true spirit and feeling of these old tales—tales that have been handed down by oral tradition alone through many generations of simple and story-loving people. The "Creation myths" and others rich in meaning have been treated very simply, as their symbolism is too complicated for very young readers; and much of the characteristic detail of the rambling native story-teller has been omitted. A story that to our thinking is most effectively told in a brief ten minutes is by him made to fill a long evening by dint of minute and realistic description of every stage of a journey, each camp made, every feature of a ceremony performed, and so on indefinitely. True, the attention of his unlettered listeners never flags; but our sophisticated youngsters would soon weary, we fear, of an such re etition.
 the animals arew rodlw ehera lllee- Essn de ais,pu  dnasohwvE eSurewn. he rly tso eupprknonsiu g inllkiy anr foirf sih dna sdnehT elemep aeec !war, buteen not h tsbevaaedium lec st re med'san neHwtee eebtalthe b int, as warta eb ot nwohs ear, eddein, tsenaf f yrierolmoc,nebiwid  athou to htred ae,rf mailiar material ohT.gnitalttiL" eMay Boe e th" n,ah thct fnmasiu r aniliascind fa fst uorinr rete eh a sini stahtthe SiouAdam of s niugal,xh saa neo wh" an Peretsworg yllaer revwn-u grot of sor aP"o  rli,d phcenevs apleelep rarts erahrepegn havdrend ofereaey ttn ;hcliuo rs ll line ovthwip a cnirhw eaf o the story of "Ta W ihetC ta ;nidlo eht nopu emo cwe" yswanaRuhei tneisrabrrig cf mase od ru, olp dnusruusrua reweet penpoerdbseni gaftns'c ahmrAndersened; and dnF taa  ,roortst of tha mig thenuhT yth dna redstonemthee Dusro;pb tul tei  teb noted here thateht c eslfnostcire aar for mpoe  blolessand eticeso t ohhtnado yntia Ghe tckJaf ehto dna rellik-tableherr redoubehA gnoleo sfot seur.Tryax-S nonol l seva ehaminuslybviois odah t--enao- dhC,enaor-llkfoo grNef o "xoF rerB" tniside quae set be,sm yab  eneldseretuars eaosendveno hw ,eht yls redyunsrR aeya.santsl giour  of eht etanabinnac e ac-Flearnc-irea dnw ciek doDbule monstrousE-yao eing r,emoihw n  adiIn banwnroohG" eht naht so arehe"Te.if Wsta m ecylcsraah spathate elicoreddeyereh d ohbosiAnn l geua GiardhTWeoocdsa yfo" Child" wutter's  yn;ianderft aetknU lla ,eem-ot-arephat y anurelimts dnuylI kaba irsthn  fisesorow trednrow-t dlre, to be sure, ectria nhcracaeticrtarulor mpae seirera ehT.ots eside ane read bed dotb yli tnnet puw nol tiunr even trap tsom etypesof snesciouocsnle-fehs not nin t ,ee,neevelolhooo-rbym he tehc roerpsnoidgnn-year-olds in tfo nerdley evif fin pe ohioc treroi dr , ecs nhtold ars upwaand m raevslhcorubtse; and i as thessu fdle am no yne,opno es,er h Ievyrnee lird lhcivelve le hawhert snoitanigami ysun po uedfet hal, so human in ista ppae,la dno  tnet,had ol iassi tah ,of sht rof tugh hildhe cfe ti lsni dotf resueapllia n  ierutaretativ os 
 
CONTENTS
PAGE
EVENINGS
 
g ared.s.EG  ..Eleabofs he tilph .sn ehTminaf las of other natioht eunsrre yatelrapaore n  ielll sti sahpytotorpch o, eaich f wheferd fipysetnt reh fo eots seirrehere a  T  ac lrtnafsroamitons, and all thedna ciw  dek dlotcwis,hend agima,sa reeoaetudnb  priifulses,ncesw teem evarb htiordfane  htenatud. A lity in mineh rnow lt euftromwhhe topesof, rts lgnoup ysu tsfyisatiand rse foA so e shtgna n mad rec hioposet sa tsomla era
FIRST SECOND
THIRD FOURTH FIFTH
SIXTH
SEVENTH EIGHTH NINTH
TENTH
ELEVENTH TWELFTH THIRTEENTH FOURTEENTH FIFTEENTH SIXTEENTH SEVENTEENTH
EIGHTEENTH NINETEENTH TWENTIETH TWENTY-FIRST TWENTY-SECOND
THEBUFFALO AND THE FIELD-MOUSE THEFROGS AND THE CRANE THEEAGLE AND THE BEAVER THEWARPARTY THEFALCON AND THE DUCK THERACCOON AND THE BEE-TREE THEBADGER AND THE BEAR THEGOOD-LUCKTOKEN UNKTOMEE AND HIS BUNDLE OFSONGS UNKTOMEE AND THE ELK THEFESTIVAL OF THE LITTLEPEOPLE EYA THEDEVOURER THEWARS OFWA-KEE-YAN ANDUNK-TAY-HEE THELITTLEBOYMAN THERETURN OF THE LITTLEBOYMAN THEFIRSTBATTLE THEBELOVED OF THE SUN WOOD-CHOPPER AND BERRY-PICKER THESON-IN-LAW THECOMRADES
THELAUGH-MAKER
THERUNAWAYS
1 15 25 31 39 49 61 71 79 89 99 107 115 123 131 139 147 155 165 175
185
193
 
 
TWENTY-THIRD TWENTY-FOURTH TWENTY-FIFTH TWENTY-SIXTH TWENTY-SEVENTH
TMRAHE RGLIRDEI  TWHEHSTAOR203 NBROHTOWIND ANDSTAR211 Y THETENVIRGINS221
THEMAGICARROWS231
THEGHOST-WIFE243
ILLUSTRATIONS
PAGE TLHEAU GSHT-RMAKERRNAEGWATCHBES THEFrontispiece  AND THE EARS SOLDOM KDY ADASY YA RTDELULNOIN HIG STAFSRELEI OF5 JUST THEN AFOXCREPTUP23 BEHIND THECRANE THEFALCON CHASES THE OLD DRAKE43 "COME DOWN,FRIENDS!"CALLED54 THERACCOON SO THEY RAN AND THEY RAN OUT OF THE WOODS ON TO THE57 SHINING WHITE BEACH "IWOULD NOT TROUBLE YOU," SAID HE, "BUT MY LITTLE FOLKS ARE STARVING" "OH,THAT IS ONLY A BUNDLE OF OLD SONGS,"REPLIEDUNKTOMEE TANAGELA AND HER LITTLE BROTHER WITH HIS LONG SPEAR HE STABBED EACH OF THE MONSTERS HE CAME TO A LITTLE HUT WHERE
67 83 91 129