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Young Folks' History of Rome

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Published 08 December 2010
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Project Gutenberg's Young Folks' History of Rome, by Charlotte Mary Yonge
This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.net
Title: Young Folks' History of Rome
Author: Charlotte Mary Yonge
Release Date: September 7, 2005 [EBook #16667]
Language: English
Character set encoding: ISO-8859-1
*** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK YOUNG FOLKS' HISTORY OF ROME ***
Produced by Juliet Sutherland, Graeme Mackreth and the Online Distributed Proofreading Team at http://www.pgdp.net
THE PO PE'S DO O RTENDER
YOUNG FOLKS' HISTORY
OF
ROME.
BY
CHARLOTTE M. YONGE,
AUTHOR OF "THE HEIR OF REDCLYFFE," "BOOK OF GOLDEN DEEDS," "YOUNG FOLKS' HISTORY OF FRANCE," &c.
BOSTON:
ESTES & LAURIAT,
301 WASHINGTON STREET.
COPYRIGHT BY
D. LOTHROP & CO. and ESTES & LAURIAT.
1880.
PREFACE.
This sketch of the History of Rome covers the period till the reign of Charles the Great as head of the new Western Empire. The history has been given as briefly as could be done consistently with such details as can alone make it interesting to all classes of readers.
CHARLOTTE M. YONGE.
1.—Italy
CONTENTS.
2.—The Wanderings of Æneas
3.—The Founding of Rome.B.C.753-713
4.—Numa and Tullus.B.C.713-618.
5.—The Driving Out of the Tarquins.B.C.578-309
6.—The War with Porsena
7.—The Roman Government
8.—Menenius Agrippa's Fable.B.C.494
9.—Coriolanus and Cincinnatus.B.C.458
10.—The Decemvirs.B.C.450
11.—Camillus' Banishment
12.—The Sack of Rome.B.C.390
13.—The Plebeian Consulate.B.C.367
14.—The Devotion of Decius.B.C.357
15.—The Samnite Wars
16.—The War with Pyrrhus. 280-271
17.—The First Punic War. 264-240
18.—Conquest of Cisalpine Gaul. 240-219
19.—The Second Punic War. 219
20.—The First Eastern War. 215-183
21.—The Conquest of Greece, Corinth, and Carthage. 179-145
22.—The Gracchi. 137-122
23.—The Wars of Marius. 106-98
24.—The Adventures of Marius. 93-84
25.—Sulla's Proscription. 88-71
26.—The Career of Pompeius. 70-63
27.—Pompeius and Cæsar. 61-48
28.—Julius Cæsar. 48-44
29.—The Second Triumvirate. 44-33
30.—Cæsar Augustus.B.C.33-A.D.14
31.—Tiberius and Caligula.A.D.14-41
32.—Claudius and Nero.A.D.41-68
33.—The Flavian Family. 62-96
34.—The Age of the Antonines. 96-194
35.—The Prætorian Influence. 197-284
36.—The Division of the Empire. 284-312
37.—Constantine the Great. 312-337
38.—Constantius. 337-364
39.—Valentinian and his Family. 364-392
40.—Theodosius the Great. 392-395
41.—Alaric the Goth. 395-410
42.—The Vandals. 403
43.—Attila the Hun. 435-457
44.—Theodoric the Ostrogoth. 457-561
45.—Belisarius. 533-563
46.—Pope Gregory the Great. 563-800
LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.
The Pope's Doortender. (Frontispiece.)
The Tiber
Curious Pottery
Jupiter
The Coast
Mount Etna
Carthage
Roman Soldier
Gladiatorial Shows at a Banquet
The Forum
Janus
Actors
Sybil's Cave
Brutus condemning his sons
Roman Ensigns, Standards, Trumpets etc.
Head of Jupiter
Female Costumes
Female Costumes
Senatorial Palace
View of a Roman Harbor
Roman Camp
Ploughing
Death of Virginia
Chariot Races
Arrow Machine
Siege Machine
Ruins of the Forum at Rome
Entry of the Forum Romanum by the Via Sacra
Costumes
Costume
Curtius leaping into the Gulf
The Apennines
Combat between a Mirmillo and a Samnite
Combat between a light armed Gladiator and a Samnite
Ancient Rome
Pyrrhus
Roman Orator
Roman Ship
Roman Order of Battle
The wounded Gaul
Hannibal's Vow
In the Pyrenees,
Meeting of Hannibal and Scipio at Zama
Archimedes
Hannibal
Corinth
Cornelia and her Sons
Roman Centurion
Marius
One of the Trophies, called of Marius, at the Capitol at Rome
The Catapult
Island on the Coast
Palazzo Vecchio, Florence
Cornelius Sulla
Coast of Tyre
Mountains of Armenia
Cicero
Colossal Statue of Pompeius of the Palazzo Spada of Rome
Pompeius
Amphitheatre
The Arena
Julius Cæsar
Cato
Funeral Solemnities in the Columbarium of the House of Julius Cæsar at the Porta Capena in Rome
Marcus Antonius
Marcus Brutus
Alexandria
Caius Octavius
Statue of Augustus at the Vatican
Paintings in the House of Livia
Ruins of the Palaces of Tiberius
Agrippina
Rome in the time of Augustus Cæsar
Claudius
Nero
Arch of Titus
Vesuvius previous to the Eruption of A.D. 63
Persecution of the Christians
Coin of Nero
Temple of Antoninus and Faustina
Marcus Aurelius
Septimus Severus
Antioch
Alexander Severus
Temple of the Sun at Palmyra
The Catacombs at Rome
Coin of Severus
Diocletian
Diocletian in Retirement
Constantine the Great
Constantinople
Council of Nicea
Catacombs
Julian
Arch of Constantine
Alexandria
Goths
Convent on the Hills
Julian Alps
Roman Hall of Justice
Colonnades of St. Peter at Rome
Alaric's Burial
Roman Clock
Spanish Coast
Vandals plundering
Pyramids and Sphynx, Egypt
Hunnish Camp
St. Mark's, Venice
The Pope's House
Romulus Augustus resigns the Crown
illustration
Naples
Constantinople
Pope Gregory the Great
The Pope's Pulpit
Battle of Tours
YOUNG FOLKS' HISTORY OF ROME.
CHAPTER I.
ITALY.
I am going to tell you next about the most famous nation in the world. Going westward from Greece another peninsula stretches do wn into the Mediterranean. The Apennine Mountains run like a li mb stretching out of the Alps to the south eastward, and on them seems forme d that land, shaped somewhat like a leg, which is called Italy.
Round the streams that flowed down from these hills, valleys of fertile soil formed themselves, and a great many different tribes and people took up their abode there, before there was any history to explai n their coming. Putting together what can be proved about them, it is plain, however, that most of them came of that old stock from which the Greeks descended, and to which we belong ourselves, and they spoke a language which had the same root as ours and as the Greek. From one of these nations the best known form of this, as it was polished in later times, was called Latin, from the tribe who spoke it.
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