Micrographia: Some Physiological Descriptions of Minute Bodies Made by Magnifying Glasses with Observations and Inquiries Thereupon

Micrographia: Some Physiological Descriptions of Minute Bodies Made by Magnifying Glasses with Observations and Inquiries Thereupon

-

English
225 Pages
Read
Download
Downloading requires you to have access to the YouScribe library
Learn all about the services we offer

Description

The Project Gutenberg eBook, Micrographia, by Robert HookeThis eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and withalmost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away orre-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License includedwith this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.netTitle: Micrographia Some Physiological Descriptions of Minute Bodies Made by Magnifying Glasses with Observations and Inquiries ThereuponAuthor: Robert HookeRelease Date: March 29, 2005 [eBook #15491]Language: EnglishCharacter set encoding: ISO-8859-1***START OF THE PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK MICROGRAPHIA***E-text prepared by Robert Shimmin, Keith Edkins, and the Project GutenbergOnline Distributed Proofreading TeamNote: Project Gutenberg also has an HTML version of this file which includes the original remarkable illustrations. See 15491-h.htm or 15491-h.zip: (http://www.gutenberg.net/dirs/1/5/4/9/15491/15491-h/15491-h.htm) or (http://www.gutenberg.net/dirs/1/5/4/9/15491/15491-h.zip) The reader of this text file should understand that words or phrases between underscores should be imagined to be set in italics. * * * * *By the Council of the ROYAL SOCIETY of Londonfor Improving of Natural Knowledge.Ordered, That the Book written by Robert Hooke, M.A. Fellow of thisSociety, Entituled, Micrographia, or some Physiological Descriptions ofMinute Bodies, made by Magnifying Glasses, ...

Informations

Published by
Reads 29
Language English
Report a problem
The Project Gutenberg eBook, Micrographia, by Robert Hooke This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.net Title: Micrographia Some Physiological Descriptions of Minute Bodies Made by Magnifying Glasses with Observations and Inquiries Thereupon Author: Robert Hooke Release Date: March 29, 2005 [eBook #15491] Language: English Character set encoding: ISO-8859-1 ***START OF THE PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK MICROGRAPHIA*** E-text prepared by Robert Shimmin, Keith Edkins, and the Project Gutenberg Online Distributed Proofreading Team Note: Project Gutenberg also has an HTML version of this file which includes the original remarkable illustrations. See 15491-h.htm or 15491-h.zip: (http://www.gutenberg.net/dirs/1/5/4/9/15491/15491-h/15491-h.htm) or (http://www.gutenberg.net/dirs/1/5/4/9/15491/15491-h.zip) The reader of this text file should understand that words or phrases between underscores should be imagined to be set in italics. * * * * * By the Council of the ROYAL SOCIETY of London for Improving of Natural Knowledge. Ordered, That the Book written by Robert Hooke, M.A. Fellow of this Society, Entituled, Micrographia, or some Physiological Descriptions of Minute Bodies, made by Magnifying Glasses, with Observations and Inquiries thereupon, Be printed by John Martyn, and James Allestry, Printers to the said Society. Novem. 23. 1664. BROUNCKER. P.R.S. * * * * * MICROGRAPHIA: OR SOME Physiological Descriptions OF MINUTE BODIES MADE BY MAGNIFYING GLASSES WITH OBSERVATIONS and INQUIRIES thereupon. * * * * * By R. HOOKE, Fellow of the ROYAL SOCIETY. _Non possis oculo quantum contendere Linceus, Non tamen idcirco contemnas Lippus inungi._ Horat. Ep. lib. 1. [Illustration] * * * * * LONDON, Printed by Jo. Martyn, and Ja. Allestry, Printers to the ROYAL SOCIETY, and are to be sold at their Shop at the Bell in S. Paul's Church-yard. M DC LX V. TO THE KING. SIR, I Do here most humbly lay this _small_ Present at _Your Majesties_ Royal feet. And though it comes accompany'd with two _disadvantages_, the _meanness_ of the _Author_, and of the _Subject_; yet in both I am _incouraged_ by the _greatness_ of your _Mercy_ and your _Knowledge_. By the _one_ I am taught, that you can _forgive_ the most _presumptuous Offendors_: And by the _other_, that you will not _esteem_ the least work of _Nature_, or _Art_, unworthy your _Observation_. Amidst the many _felicities_ that have accompani'd _your Majesties_ happy _Restauration_ and _Government_, it is none of the least considerable that _Philosophy_ and _Experimental Learning_ have _prosper'd_ under your _Royal Patronage_. And as the calm prosperity of your Reign has given us the _leisure_ to follow these _Studies_ of _quiet_ and _retirement_, so it is just, that the _Fruits_ of them should, by way of _acknowledgement_, be return'd to _your Majesty_. There are, Sir, several other of your Subjects, of your _Royal Society_, now busie about _Nobler_ matters: The _Improvement_ of _Manufactures_ and _Agriculture_, the _Increase_ of _Commerce_, the _Advantage_ of _Navigation_: In all which they are _assisted_ by _your Majesties Incouragement_ and _Example_. Amidst all those _greater_ Designs, I here presume to bring in that which is more _proportionable_ to the _smalness_ of my Abilities, and to offer some of the _least_ of all _visible things_, to that _Mighty King_, that has _establisht an Empire_ over the best of all _Invisible things_ of this World, the _Minds_ of Men. Your Majesties most humble and most obedient Subject and Servant, ROBERT HOOKE. * * * * * TO THE ROYAL SOCIETY. After my _Address_ to our _Great Founder_ and _Patron_, I could not but think my self oblig'd, in consideration of those _many Ingagements_ you have laid upon me, to offer these my _poor Labours_ to this MOST ILLUSTRIOUS ASSEMBLY. YOU have been pleas'd formerly to accept of these rude _Draughts_. I have since added to them some _Descriptions_, and some _Conjectures_ of my own. And therefore, together with YOUR _Acceptance_, I must also beg YOUR _pardon_. The Rules YOU have prescrib'd YOUR selves in YOUR Philosophical Progress do seem the best that have ever yet been practis'd. And particularly that of avoiding _Dogmatizing_, and the _espousal_ of any _Hypothesis_ not sufficiently grounded and confirm'd by _Experiments_. This way seems the most excellent, and may preserve both _Philosophy_ and _Natural History_ from its former _Corruptions_. In saying which, I may seem to condemn my own Course in this Treatise; in which there may perhaps be some _Expressions_, which may seem more _positive_ then YOUR Prescriptions will permit: And though I desire to have them understood only as _Conjectures_ and _Qu ries_ (which YOUR Method does not altogether � disallow) yet if even in those I have exceeded, 'tis fit that I should declare, that it was not done by YOUR Directions. For it is most unreasonable, that YOU should undergo the _imputation_ of the _faults_ of my _Conjectures_, seeing YOU can receive so _small advantage_ of reputation by the _sleight Observations_ of YOUR most humble and most faithful Servant ROBERT HOOKE. * * * * * THE PREFACE. It is the great prerogative of Mankind above other Creatures, that we are not only able to _behold_ the works of Nature, or barely to _sustein_ our lives by them, but we have also the power of _considering_, _comparing_, _altering_, _assisting_, and _improving_ them to various uses. And as this is the peculiar priviledge of humane Nature in general, so is it capable of being so far advanced by the helps of Art, and Experience, as to make some Men excel others in their Observations, and Deductions, almost as much as they do Beasts. By the addition of such _artificial Instruments_ and _methods_, there may be, in some manner, a reparation made for the mischiefs, and imperfection, mankind has drawn upon it self, by negligence, and intemperance, and a wilful and superstitious deserting the Prescripts and Rules of Nature, whereby every man, both from a deriv'd corruption, innate and born with him, and from his breeding and converse with men, is very subject to slip into all sorts of errors. The only way which now remains for us to recover some degree of those former perfections, seems to be, by rectifying the operations of the _Sense_, the _Memory_, and _Reason_, since upon the evidence, the _strength_, the _integrity_, and the _right correspondence_ of all these, all the light, by which our actions are to be guided is to be renewed, and all our command over things it to be establisht. It is therefore most worthy of our consideration, to recollect their several defects, that so we may the better understand how to supply them, and by what assistances we may _inlarge_ their power, and _secure_ them in performing their particular duties. As for the actions of our _Senses_, we cannot but observe them to be in many particulars much outdone by those of other Creatures, and when at best, to be far short of the perfection they seem capable of: And these infirmities of the Senses arise from a double cause, either from the _disproportion of the Object to the Organ_, whereby an infinite number of things can never enter into them, or else from _error in the Perception_, that many things, which come within their reach, are not received in a right manner. The like frailties are to be found in the _Memory;_ we