Canvas Tarps and Cargo Control
2 Pages
English
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Canvas Tarps and Cargo Control

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2 Pages
English

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http://www.myteeproducts.com/throw-tarps/canvas-tarps.html - Here is a hypothetical scenario between a customer and truck driver who have a slight difference in opinion of how to control and protect cargo. A truck driver arrives to pick up a load from a well-paying customer who insists on using canvas tarps.

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Published 17 August 2017
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Language English

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Canvas Tarps and Cargo Control
Here is a hypothetical scenario between a customer and truck driver who have a slight difference in opinion of how to control and protect cargo. A truck driver arrives to pick up a load from a well-paying customer who insists on using canvas tarps. The trucker is no fan of canvas, being that it is a much heavier material and can be a bit tedious to manage without assistance. But canvas is what the customer wants, so canvas is what the truck driver uses.
Truck drivers may spend some time and energy mulling over their difference in view points with shippers about cargo control and tarping. From our point of view, it is wasted time and energy. Shippers and receivers are paying for the service that truckers provide. Without those shippers and receivers, it would be hard to imagine how cargo management would take place smoothly. Also building a trusting relationship with both, shippers and receivers results in more trucking business.
The Shipper’s Vieǁ of Cargo
One of the reasons truck drivers struggle with cargo control and carving requirements is a lack of understanding of how shippers and receivers view cargo. This is understandable as each is a subject matter expert in their own right. In fact, truckers view cargo in an entirely different wayas we will explain in the next section. As for shippers and receivers, they see cargo in one of several ways.
Fiƌst, the Đaƌgo a shippeƌ seŶds oŶ the ďaĐk of a flatďed tƌuĐk ĐaŶ ďe ǀieǁed as a souƌĐe of iŶĐoŵe. Let͛s saLJ the shippeƌ is a manufacturer of paver stones and bricks. Every load sent out on the back of a truck represents a revenue stream. Maximizing revenue is about making sure loads get to their destinations fully intact and without damage. Cargo control and tarping are seen as tools for maximizing revenue streams.
Receivers view cargo in much the same way, though a bit more indirectly. A retailer receiving a load of paver stones and bricks may see those individual pieces as revenue generators, but they are also viewed as part of a much larger inventory that speaks ǀoluŵes aďout the ƌetaileƌ͛s ƌeputatioŶ as a supplieƌ. The ƌetaileƌ ĐaŶŶot affoƌd daŵaged oƌ ďleŵished pƌoduĐts that Đould haƌŵ the ďusiŶess͛s ƌeputatioŶ.
A third way of viewing cargo is a bit more personal. Take the owner of several classic cars as an example. Those cars are more than just frames with four wheels and an engine. Classic car collectors often treat their vehicles as parts of an extended family. They are investments that are highly personal and, as such, involve an emotional attachment. Truckers ǁould edžpeĐt a ĐlassiĐ Đaƌ oǁŶeƌ to ƌeƋuiƌe ĐaŶǀas taƌps iŶstead of polLJ. CaŶǀas is safeƌ foƌ a Đaƌ͛s deliĐate fiŶish.
The Driǀer’s Vieǁ of Cargo
CoŶfliĐt ďetǁeeŶ tƌuĐkeƌs aŶd shippeƌs/ƌeĐeiǀeƌs ĐaŶ aƌise ďeĐause of the dƌiǀeƌ͛s diffeƌeŶt ǀieǁ. For the average truck driver, there is no personal or emotional attachment to cargo. The cargo is not seen as a direct revenue stream either. The trucker is being paid for a service, not for the product on the back of the trailer.
Finn Murphy, a veteran truck driver and mover interviewed by FleetOwner this past July, refers to this view among tƌuĐkeƌs as the ͚Buddhist ǀieǁ of attaĐhŵeŶt͛. He edžplaiŶs that dƌiǀeƌs do Ŷot attaĐh aŶLJ iŶtƌiŶsiĐ ǀalue to the Đaƌgo theLJ are carrying. It is just freight. Still,MuƌphLJ ƌeĐogŶizes the tƌuĐkeƌ͛s ƌespoŶsiďilitLJ to pƌoteĐt that fƌeight at all Đosts foƌ the benefit of shippers and receivers.
A shippeƌ oƌ ƌeĐeiǀeƌ ŵaLJ ƌeƋuiƌe the use of ĐaŶǀas taƌps foƌ aŶLJ Ŷuŵďeƌ of ƌeasoŶs. That͛s fiŶe. It͛s ƌeallLJ up to theŵ to decide how they want their cargo protected from point A to point B. Despite the Buddhist view of attachment, it is up to truck drivers to do what makes customers happy.