CDL Training Schools May Have To Switch Gears
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CDL Training Schools May Have To Switch Gears

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2 Pages
English

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CDL Training Schools May Have To Switch Gears If the law in Ohio is an indication of the future, CDL training schools may have to switch gears–literally and both figuratively.New restrictionsin Ohio went into effect on July 1 (2015) requiring CDL drivers to have received training to drive manual transmission vehicles. This can be a problem for training schools that use fleets made up exclusively of automatic transmission trucks. To be clear, the new restrictions do not prevent drivers from operating automatic transmission trucks in the absence of manual transmission training. It only stipulates that someone who has not received the necessary training cannot drive a truck with a manual transmission. The American Trucking Association's P. Sean Garney says that drivers that have never been trained with manual transmissions may not understand the complexities of properly shifting gears. Any veteran truck driver knows the kinds of problems this can cause. Improper shifting can lead to stalling, excessively slow acceleration, accidents with other vehicles, and costly engine damage. Trucking Companies Must Choose It is not clear whether other states will follow Ohio's lead for truck licensing. However, if they do, trucking companies will have to decide how they want to handle driver recruitment in the future.

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Published 21 July 2015
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CDL Training Schools May Have To Switch Gears If the law in Ohio is an indication of the future, CDL training schools may have to switch gearsliterally and both figuratively.New restrictionsin Ohio went into effect on July 1 (2015) requiring CDL drivers to have received training to drive manual transmission vehicles. This can be a problem for training schools that use fleets made up exclusively of automatic transmission trucks.
To be clear, the new restrictions do not prevent drivers from operating automatic transmission trucks in the absence of manual transmission training. It only stipulates that someone who has not received the necessary training cannot drive a truck with a manual transmission. The American Trucking Association's P. Sean Garney says that drivers that have never been trained with manual transmissions may not understand the complexities of properly shifting gears. Any veteran truck driver knows the kinds of problems this can cause. Improper shifting can lead to stalling, excessively slow acceleration, accidents with other vehicles, and costly engine damage. Trucking Companies Must Choose It is not clear whether other states will follow Ohio's lead for truck licensing. However, if they do, trucking companies will have to decide how they want to handle driver recruitment in the future. It is no secret that some are already choosing to upgrade fleets with new automatic transmission vehicles as a way of encouraging new drivers to enter the industry. The automatic transmission strategy is seen as especially important to recruiting women. On the other hand, there are trucking companies that still prefer manual transmissions for their perceived power and fuel mileage benefits. It may be a hard sell to convince these companies to transition to automatic transmissions solely for the purposes of driver recruitment. Those who choose to continue using manual equipment may eventually be forced by state laws to ensure new drivers have been trained accordingly.
As with most things, there are definite advantages and disadvantages to both sides of the equation. It will be up to trucking company owners and managers to decide what is most important to them. It would seem to make sense to ensure as many drivers as possible can operate manual transmissions even if a company utilizes a fleet of automatic transmission trucks. You never know when a manual vehicle may be needed in a pinch. The End of Manual Transmissions It has been suggested that the introduction of computerization into the automotive industry would spell the end of manual transmission trucks. That has not happened yet, but that's not to say it will never happen. Computerization has made automatic transitions more durable, more powerful, and certainly more fuel-efficient than they have ever been. Combining those benefits with the potential of attracting more new drivers makes manual transmission trucks fairly attractive in the modern era. As for CDL training schools, those located in Ohio now have little choice but to offer manual transmission training to students. We expect some will make it a mandatory part of their training programs while others will make it optional. In either case, CDL drivers in Ohio now have to have training appropriate to the types of vehicles they are operating. Drivers that want to maximize their hiring opportunities would probably do well to receive manual training. Here at C.R. England, we are always looking for skilled drivers to help us provide excellent service to our customers. We work witha well-known network of CDL training schoolsprovide the training our drivers need to get started. If you to have ever thought about a career in trucking, now is the time to contact us at C.R. England. Sources: 1.LimaOhio.com-http://limaohio.com/news/68976/rules-changing-for-truck-drivers2.C.R. England -http://www.crengland.com/truck-driving-schools