Finding That First Trucking Job Can Be an Adventure
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Finding That First Trucking Job Can Be an Adventure

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Finding That First Trucking Job Can Be an Adventure You go to school, get your CDL license, and start looking for work in around your home in Indianapolis. But you cannot find a job.

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Published 26 April 2016
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Language English
Finding That First Trucking Job Can Be an Adventure
You go to school, get your CDL license, and start looking for work in around your home in Indianapolis. But you cannot find a job. You are both incredulous and dismayed, especially since virtually every CDL school in Indiana advertises its services by telling you that there are tens of thousands of jobs just waiting to be had. What gives?
The trucking industry offers drivers a dichotomy that can make finding that first job an adventure. What is that dichotomy? It is the reality that trucking companies want experienced drivers they don't have to babysit, yet drivers cannot gain experience if they can't get a job. For the record, trucking is not the only industry that suffers from this paradox. Still, there are ways to get around it.
Company-Sponsored Training Programs
The new driver who has not yet signed up for training can avoid the entire problem by seeking employment with a company that offers its own training. C.R. England is an example. We train unlicensed drivers by sending them to one of the manyPremier Truck Driving Schoolsor schools that we contract with that are located throughout the country. Upon completion of that training, all drivers who meet the rest of our hiring requirements are guaranteed employment.
Signing up with an employer that offers company-sponsored training is one of the best ways to break into the business. Not only is there a job waiting for the driver upon completion of training, that job also includes additional behind-the-wheel training in the real world. Drivers who do well and meet all the demands of employers can work for their companies for as long as they wish.
Lower-Paying Local Jobs
Whenregional and over-the-road jobsare not available to new drivers, there may be opportunities to work for local carriers with fewer than a dozen vehicles in their fleets. Local trucking jobs do not tend to pay as well as their regio nal and over-the-road counterparts, but they do offer a good starting place for new drivers.
Unfortunately, some new drivers tend to shy away from local jobs because these are more route delivery than straight driving. Local jobs tend to involve direct handling of freight; they tend to be more physically demanding; they tend to be more complicated in terms of driver requirements on a daily basis. But new drivers have to start somewhere. If a lower paying local job is what it takes to get going, it is well worth putting in two or three years to gain the experience needed to become a regional or over-the-road driver.
Moving out of State
While it is true that the trucking industry is currently short tens of thousands of licensed drivers, it is also true that the job market is not the same everywhere you go. Getting that first trucking job might mean moving away from home. It might mean moving clear across the country to a state where the job market is more friendly.
That CDL school in Indiana may routinely paint a rosy picture that gives new drivers the impression they will be hired within minutes of getting their licensesthat is not reality. Finding a truck driving job may be easier than finding jobs in other industries, but there is still work involved.
C.R. England is proud to offer company-sponsored training to new drivers without licenses. We are interested in speaking with you if you have ever considered professional driving as a career. We also have openings for experienced company drivers, independent contractors, and drivers looking to be part of a team.Contact usto learn more.