The Damned United
108 Pages
English
Downloading requires you to have access to the YouScribe library
Learn all about the services we offer

The Damned United

-

Downloading requires you to have access to the YouScribe library
Learn all about the services we offer
108 Pages
English

Description

Movie Release Date : October 2009

Subjects

Informations

Published by
Reads 4
Language English

Exrait

THE DAMNED UNITED

Written by

Peter Morgan

From the novel by

David Peace

1EXT. ELLAND ROAD - DAY - (1974)1

Heavy leaden skies over the arachnoid stands and floodlights of Elland Road stadium: home to Leeds United football club.

And rain. Sheets of angry, Yorkshire rain.

TITLE: "THE DAMNED UNITED"

2INT. BOARDROOM - ELLAND ROAD - DAY - (1974)2

Flashlights pop as DON REVIE, (late 40's), the most successful manager in English football, walks out in front of a pack of newspaper and TV REPORTERS. He is flanked by the Chairman of Leeds United, (MANNY CUSSINS, 60's), and several other white-haired blazer-wearing members of the Board.

REVIE

I'm just going to make a brief statement.

CAPTION: "JULY 4th, 1974"

REVIE stands under a large trophy cabinet, filled with the silverware he has won. REPORTERS wait: intimidated. Cowed.

REVIE (cont'd)

Yesterday afternoon at 3.00, I accepted the FA's offer to become the next manager of the England national football team.

A gasp among the JOURNALISTS. A burst of flashlights. The BOARD MEMBERS look down at the floor in silence. Bereaved fathers losing their favourite son.

REVIE (cont'd)

Obviously that involves me leaving Leeds United after 13 happy and successful years, which makes me very sad. I'd like to think I have built the club into a family and there must be sadness when anybody leaves a family. However, when one man goes, another steps into his place. I know who I think that person should be, the man to replace me, and I shall make my feelings clear to the directors. Thank you. No further comments.

REVIE turns and walks out, a volley of REPORTERS shouting questions...

FADE TO BLACK:

2

3EXT. MOTORWAY - DAY - (1974)3

We're in a car. Tarmac passes beneath us. Roadmarkings.

OVER THIS: the sound of a flat Teeside voice, singing along with Frank Sinatra on the radio...

VOICE (V.O.)

"Fly me to the Moon.."

4INT. CAR - DAY - (1974)4

Two young BOYS, (12, 9) stare out of car windows. Raindrops on the panes of glass. Their father, BRIAN CLOUGH, (39), slick, modern, cocky, handsome. About as big a contrast to DON REVIE as it's possible to find, is up front. Driving..

CLOUGH

(singing)

"And let me play among the stars.."

SIMON

When are we there?

CLOUGH

Any moment now. On the right. (singing) "Let me see what spring is like..."

The car turns a bend, and suddenly the floodlights and stands of a football stadium come into view. The BOYS' eyes widen.

BOY 1

There it is! Dad! There it is! The BOYS smile in excitement.

CLOUGH

(singing)

"..on Jupiter and Mars.."

`LEEDS UNITED FOOTBALL CLUB' written on the side of the stadium. CLOUGH smiles, then puts his foot down. The car accelerates past the turning. The BOYS' smiles fade.

BOY 1

Where are you going? Dad? You've missed it.

CLOUGH

We've something else to do first. Won't take long. (singing) (MO RE) (CO NTINU ED)

3

4CON TINUE D:4 CLO UGH (cont'd) "In other words, hold my hand. In other words, darling kiss me..."

The MUSIC continues as the car drives on, turning into the MUSIC of a television program..

5INT. TELEVISION STUDIO - DAY - (1974)5

The `CALENDER' front title sequence, a Yorkshire TV current affairs program. We're in a TV studio. The presenter is AUSTIN MITCHELL, (40)..

MITCHELL

Today we welcome Brian Clough as he starts his new job as manager of Leeds United, taking over from Don Revie - the most successful manager in the club's history, under whom Leeds have won everything.. CLOUGH ..not QUITE everything. Not won the European Cup...

MITCHELL

...but pretty much everything else. Daunted?

CLOUGH

Daunted? Not at all, Austin. Looking forward to it.

MITCHELL

The biggest challenge of your life, and you'll be without Peter Taylor, for the first time. Your lifelong professional colleague.

CLOUGH

Yes, Pete's at Brighton now. He had the opportunity to come with me, but Brighton was his choice. Leeds was mine.

MITCHELL

A surprising choice, some might say. Because you've been very vocal in your criticism of them over the years.

CLOUGH

I have.

(CO NTINU ED)

4

5CON TINUE D:5

MITCHELL

You've accused players of dirty tactics, cheating, dissent, foul play. You called Norman Hunter, Norman "Bites yer legs" Hunter, you've said Peter Lorimer falls when no one touches him...

CLOUGH

And I was right.

MITCHELL

I'm curious. Why do you now show such alacrity to joining them after such vituperative criticism of them for so long?

CLOUGH

Goodness, it's going to take me half an hour to explain all those words for a start.

Laughter from the camera CREW..

CLOUGH (cont'd)

Football is a beautiful game, Austin. It needs to be played beautifully. I think Leeds have sold themselves short...

5AINT. REVIE'S HOUSE - SAME TIME5A

CLOUGH's interview continues on a TV in a sitting-room, where it is being watched by Don Revie, sitting in an armchair... CLOUGH (ON TV) ..they've been champions but they've not been good champions in the sense of wearing the crown well. They've not been loved. But then that's hardly surprising, given the type of operation there's been in place there.

5BINT. YORKSHIRE TV STUDIOS - DAY5B

CLOUGH continues...

CLOUGH

Football clubs are like families, footballers are sensitive people. I'd like to bring a little warmth into the set-up...

(CO NTINU ED)

4A

5BCON TINUE D:5B

MITCHELL

"That type of operation?" I presume you're referring to Don Revie..

CLOUGH

I am..

5CINT. REVIE'S HOUSE - SAME TIME5C

REVIE continues to watch the TV...

MITCHELL

..who has long been regarded as a father figure in Leeds. And now you're coming in as the outsider, the enemy even, after all the things you've said in public, coming in and taking ouver as STEPfather.

5DINT. YORKSHIRE TV - SAME TIME5D

MITCHELL looks up at CLOUGH...

(CO NTINU ED)

5

5DCON TINUE D:5D

MITCHELL

Don't you expect some degree of resentment to this?

CLOUGH

I would accept and expect a strangeness, initially, it'sperfectly normal. But it won't be longbefore they realise I'm a fair man.A kind man. And maybe under me theycan experience what it's like tobe in a happy family, after all.

MITCHELL

How can you be sure they weren't happy with Don all along?

CLOUGH

They wouldn't have played football that way if they were happy.

5EINT. REVIE'S HOUSE - SAME TIME5E

DON REVIE's eyes burn with indignation. He picks up a telephone, and angrily starts to dial..

6EXT. TRAINING FIELD - DAY - (1974)6

Here they are. The Leeds PLAYERS. Long hair and long faces. Surly. Truculent. Dangerous.

Out on the practice pitch. In the rain. Some doing warm-up exercises. Others milling dangerously in groups. Their names on their purple track suits.

HUNTER, LORIMER, GILES, BATES, GRAY, CLARKE, BREMNER, MCQUEEN

7EXT. CAR PARK - ELLAND ROAD - DAY - (1974)7

CLOUGH's car pulls up. He and his sons get out. A few waiting press. Cameras. Lights. A few FANS with autograph books.

JIMMY GORDON

Where have you been, boss?

JIMMY GORDON, CLOUGH loyal trainer, his face creased with anxiety..

JIMMY

Directors have been waiting more than an hour. C'mon..

(CO NTINU ED)

5A

7CON TINUE D:7

JIMMY GORDON leads CLOUGH past the training pitch. CLOUGH looks out..

(CO NTINU ED)

6

7CON TINUE D: (2)7

CLOUGH

Morning lads! Lovely Yorkshire weather! (gestures shivering) I tell you makes me want to jump on a plane right back to Majorca!

CLOUGH laughs. The PLAYERS stare in silence. Squinting in the drizzle. Condensation coming from their mouths.

JOHNNY GILES stares. BILLY BREMNER spits and continues talking disrespectfully.

CLOUGH (cont'd)

Not much of a welcome, was it? And not so much as a smile from Johnny Giles.

JIMMY

You're five days late!! And did you really need to say that about Majorca? (beat, changing the subject) You know he was Revie's first choice for getting your job.

CLOUGH

Who? Johnny Giles?

CLOUGH looks over at GILES, who turns away, resumes training....

CLOUGH (cont'd)

Was he now? And Bremner?

JIMMY

Club Captain. Don's son and heir. His first born. You're never going to get any love from him.

BREMNER, a flint-eyed Scot, stares at CLOUGH..

CLOUGH

Great. Here's to happy fucking families.

8INT. CORRIDOR - ELLAND ROAD - DAY - (1974)8

JIMMY GORDON leads CLOUGH and his BOYS down a corridor, where countless photographs of DON REVIE hang on the walls. Holding silverware.

They pass an open door, with a sign outside, `MANAGER. Mr. DON. REVIE.' CLOUGH stops. Looks at the sign.

(CO NTINU ED)

6A

8CON TINUE D:8

Then pushes open the door..

7

9INT. MANAGER'S OFFICE - ELLAND ROAD - DAY - (1974)9

CLOUGH walks into the manager's office. The empty chair. The bare desk. His desk. Don's desk.

CLOUGH takes a seat in the chair.

Presently, a middle-aged matron, JEAN REID, Don Revie's faithful SECRETARY for 13 years, appears in the doorway..

CLOUGH

Any chance of a cup of tea, duck?

JEAN

They're waiting for you. Upstairs.

CLOUGH swings his feet on the desk.

CLOUGH

Who's that? JEAN The Directors.

CLOUGH

For me? Why?

JEAN

For the board meeting.

CLOUGH

Let them wait. Now, how about that cup of tea?

CLOUGH smiles sweetly, but JEAN stares at CLOUGH. She pointedly doesn't move. CLOUGH lowers his feet.

CLOUGH (cont'd)

All right, I'll go then. Wouldn't want to get off on the wrong foot.

CLOUGH walks over to the door. Looks at the desk.

CLOUGH (cont'd)

Who's desk is that, love?

JEAN

Yours, Mr. Clough.

CLOUGH

Not mine. I didn't put it there, did I?

JEAN

Mr. Revie's. (CO NTINU ED)

8

9CON TINUE D:9

CLOUGH

Let's get rid of it then, shall we? Chairs, too. The whole bloody lot. Think it would be best if there were nothing of his left here.

CLOUGH reaches the door..

CLOUGH (cont'd)

Were you his secretary?

JEAN

I was. For thirteen happy years.

CLOUGH

What's your name, pet?

JEAN

Jean, Sir. Jean Reid. CLOUGH In which case, no offence duck, but there's nothing I want typed on paper from you other than your resignation.

She gasps..

CLOUGH (cont'd)

And you can change the locks on your way out. Don't want the ghost of troubled Don popping in now, do we? Rattling his chains. Scaring my young ones.

CLOUGH puts his arms protectively round the BOYS, and leads them out of the door. JEAN REID stares, visibly shaken.

10INT. BOARDROOM - ELLAND ROAD - DAY - (1974)10

Half-a-dozen white-haired patriarchs sit at a large table. Matching blazers and matching brass. MANNY CUSSINS, SAM BOLTON, BOB ROBERTS, SYDNEY SIMON, PERCY WOODWARD.

Aldermen and Rotary club members. Masons and businessmen.

CLOUGH enters the boardroom. Indicates to JIMMY GORDON to look after the BOYS outside. Inside: matching curtains and carpets.

CUSSINS

Come in, Brian.

CLOUGH sits down at the head of the table. Rubs his hands together.. (CO NTINU ED)

9

10CON TINUE D:10

CLOUGH

What? No one going to offer me a drink? Like an undertakers in here.

The DIRECTORS shoot looks at one another.

CUSSINS

Why did you do it?

CLOUGH

Do what?

BOLTON

The interview. For Yorkshire TV.

CUSSIN

We've had a phone-call.

BOLTON

Not so much a phone-call. Bloody tirade.

CUSSINS

From Don. They only went and rung him. And ran some of your quotes by him. About how unhappy the players were. What "bad champions". Looking for a response.

BOLTON

(shudders to himself)

Bloody got one, as well. He's gone berserk.

CLOUGH

He had it coming. He shouldn't have done that piece in the Mirror should he? Saying he thought I was a daft choice.

BOLTON

He's entitled to his opinions.

CLOUGH

And I'm entitled to mine.

CUSSINS

(barks, flame on)

And I'm entitled to MINE.

The room falls silent. That got everyone's attention.

(CO NTINU ED)

10

10CON TINUE D: (2)10

CUSSINS (cont'd)

I hired you to do this job because I think you're the best young manager in the country...

CLOUGH

Thank you. I'm the best old one, too.

CUSSINS

...I also did it under the assumption that you'd be coming here wanting the best for the club. For the city of Leeds. So why do I still get the feeling this is all about you and Don?

CLOUGH

Of course it's just about me and Don. Always has been. But instead of putting frowns on your foreheads, o ye elders of Leeds, in your blazers and brass fucking buttons, it should put big white Colgate smiles on your big white faces, because it means I won't sleep and won't eat until I take whatever that man's achieved and beaten it -- beaten it so I never have to hear the name "Don Fucking Revie" again -- beat it so the only name anyone sings in their Yorkshire ale houses, raising their stinking jars to their stinking mouths, is Brian Clough. Brian Clough uber fucking alles. Understand?

The blazers and brass buttons, WHITE-HAIRED ELDERS of Leeds stare at one another.

CUT TO: