The Juice is Worth the Squeeze: Taxes and Homeownership

The Juice is Worth the Squeeze: Taxes and Homeownership

English
3 Pages
Read
Download
Downloading requires you to have access to the YouScribe library
Learn all about the services we offer

Description

The Juice is Worth the Squeeze: Taxes and Homeownership  Editor's note: These tips are for informational purposes only. I am a loan officer with knowledge of available  home‐ownership‐related tax benefits. I am not a tax professional.  Paying taxes is one of the least fun activities around, but like many of life’s  unpleasantries, it’s absolutely necessary.

Subjects

Informations

Published by
Published 25 January 2015
Reads 0
Language English
Report a problem

The Juice is Worth the Squeeze: Taxes and Homeownership 
Editor's note: These tips are for informational purposes only. I am a loan officer with knowledge of available 
home‐ownership‐related tax benefits. I am not a tax professional. 
Paying taxes is one of the least fun activities around, but like many of life’s 
unpleasantries, it’s absolutely necessary.  The thing is, that there are a number 
of ways to lessen the pain, one of the best being the very simple act of buying 
and owning your own home.  
The process may be daunting, but once you’ve cleared the complication hurdles, 
the juice is certainly worth the squeeze. Deductions are everywhere and with a 
reasonable amount of effort you can lessen your tax burden substantially.  
The Biggest Deduction 
As homeowners we dutifully pay our mortgage interest every month – thank 
goodness its tax deductible. In fact, your tax‐deductible mortgage interest is the 
single biggest deduction available of all homeowner deductions.  
Your second mortgage is tax deductible as well.  
The idea is transferable for interest accrued while refinancing, acquiring home 
equity loans, and home equity credit. Just be careful of restrictions that apply to 
mortgage debt that ends up being higher than your property’s current value.  
More Efficient, More Tax Credits 
Energy efficiency is getting to be a big deal these days with more concern about 
per capita energy use and environmental impacts. Part of the government’s 
response has been EnergyStar.gov – a resource for understanding the efficiency 
and benefits of your appliances. Look for the Energy Star seal on your appliances 
replaced within the past year. They likely earn you a tax credit. Investigate local 
and state policies as well – it’s possible you can earn some efficiencies there as 
well.  
You’ll also get deductions for home efficiency renovations and improvements 
like sealed windows and doors, new heating and air conditioners, a more 
efficient water heater, fans, basically anything that uses less energy to perform the same function as its less efficient predecessor. Think of the “green energy” 
realm of products. Save the receipts for obvious tax reasons.  
Another Major Deducation 
Property taxes are another major deduction available for homeowners.  
A substantial piece of loan payments comprise of taxes headed to an escrow 
account annually. The taxes will in on your annual statement and include 
interest data as well. The taxes will be annual deductions for homeowners.  
If you’re new to owning your own home, as in the first year, find your 
settlement statement to be able to apply deductions forthcoming.  
A Question of When 
When you sell and when you buy are of great importance.  
Again, if you’re new to owning your own home, the tax payments were likely 
split between you and the seller, so that you both only pay taxes for that 
percentage of the year in which you actually legally owned the home.  
The homeowner’s share of taxes is fully deductible.  
Sellers are in a different, more complicated position. Anything up to $250,000 in 
sales gain, which would be $500,000 for married people who jointly file, do not 
need to cough up capital gains taxes as long as the owner used the home as 
their main residence for two years.  
Most average homeowners can really benefit from investigating the tax benefits 
of owning one’s own home. It’s oftentimes their most significant investment, 
largest asset, and juiciest tax break. These benefits are excellent arguments for 
buying and owning your own home. Figure out what makes sense for you, but 
don’t forget to think through Uncle Sam’s various incentives, especially tax 
breaks related to homeownership. 
Brought to you by the team at DelawareMortgageLoans.net and 203kloan.net