Total Loss Cash Value Recovery System

Total Loss Cash Value Recovery System

-

English
10 Pages
Read
Download
Downloading requires you to have access to the YouScribe library
Learn all about the services we offer

Description

COPYRIGHT You are free to distribute and share this publication for non-commercial purposes. RIGHTSThere are NO Resell rights for the Special Report. There are NO Private Label rights for the Special Report. You may NOT distribute this report in any way for commercial purposes. LIABILITY DISCLAIMER This manual is intended for education and informational purpose only and the author does not accept any responsibilities for any liabilities or damages, real or perceived, resulting from the use of the information. The information contained herein is the opinion and views of the author at the date of publication based on information gathered from many sources but mainly from personal experience. As technologies and conditions constantly change, the author reserves the right to alter and update his opinions based on the new conditions. While every attempt has been made to verify the information provided herein, the author and his affiliates do not assume any responsibility for errors, inaccuracies or omissions. Any slights to people or organisations are unintentional. All claim earnings described in this product and shown on our website are accurate to the best of our knowledge, and should not be considered "typical". The author does not accept any responsibilities or guarantee you will have a successful claim or you will receive any monetary compensation at all. Every person has different goals and expectations.

Subjects

Informations

Published by
Published 08 March 2015
Reads 1
Language English
Report a problem
COPYRIGHT You are free to distribute and share this publication for non-commercial purposes. RIGHTSThere are NO Resell rights for the Special Report. There are NO Private Label rights for the Special Report. You may NOT distribute this report in any way for commercial purposes. LIABILITY DISCLAIMER This manual is intended for education and informational purpose only and the author does not accept any responsibilities for any liabilities or damages, real or perceived, resulting from the use of the information. The information contained herein is the opinion and views of the author at the date of publication based on information gathered from many sources but mainly from personal experience. As technologies and conditions constantly change, the author reserves the right to alter and update his opinions based on the new conditions. While every attempt has been made to verify the information provided herein, the author and his affiliates do not assume any responsibility for errors, inaccuracies or omissions. Any slights to people or organisations are unintentional. All claim earnings described in this product and shown on our website are accurate to the best of our knowledge, and should not be considered "typical". The author does not accept any responsibilities or guarantee you will have a successful claim or you will receive any monetary compensation at all. Every person has different goals and expectations. This combined with vast differences in personality, discipline and other traits means that every person will reach a different outcome. No responsibility whatsoever is assumed by the author for any material contained herein. By reading this document, you assume all risks associated with using the advice given below, with a full understanding that you, solely, are responsible for anything that may occur as a result of putting this information into action in any way, and regardless of your interpretation of the advice. You further agree that the author cannot be held responsible in any way for the success or failure of your claim outcome as a result of the information presented below. It is your responsibility to conduct your own due diligence regarding the safe and successful operation of your business if you intend to apply any of this information in any way to your business operations. None of the instruction here will work unless you actually do something about it and take action. Knowledge is useless without action. Only reading these pages and taking no action will have the same effect as not reading it at all.
RIGHTSThere are NO Resell rights for Total Loss Cash Recovery. There are NO Private Label rights for Total Loss Cash Recovery. You may NOT distribute this report in any way (paid or free). COPYRIGHT © 2014 ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.
Introduction The goal of this Special Report is to educate you how to get the best possible cash payout on yourtotal loss vehicle. Too many people blindly trust their insurer’s determination of actual cash value on their total loss vehicle. They do this without even asking how the insurer came up with its cash value estimate for the vehicle. Basically, the insurance industry leads you to believe they have your best interest at heart. I’m here to tell you they don’t and you will see why as you read though this report. Some people will question the insurer because they believe they are not getting paid the true cash value of their vehicle. The problem is even if they are right they do not know how to evaluate the insurer’s offer or how tomake a sound counter offer. So what typically happens is they give the insurer a few unsupported weak arguments hoping the insurer will raise the cash value of their offer. The only way you stand a chance is by having a sound counter offer backed up by market evidence. Doing this is your best chances to collecting every penny you rightfully deserve form your insurer for your total loss vehicle. By reading this material, you will learn how to immediately know what a fair cash payout looks like and how to provide the evidence you need to support a higher payout. What is Actual Cash Value? In terms of a vehicle it can be defined as:the mostprobableprice, as of a specified date, in cash, for which the specified vehicle should sell after reasonable exposure in a competitive market under all conditions requisite to a fair sale,with the buyer and seller each actingprudently,knowledgeably, and for self-interest, and assuming that neither is under undue duress. What does it meanwhen your vehicle is declared a “Total Loss”?
A“total loss” or“write-off” areterms use to describe the condition of your vehicle after it suffers severe damage due to an accident or vandalism and is not considered economical to repair. Sales Comparison This is the method the insurance company will use to produce an actual cash value estimate foryour total loss vehicle. Sales comparison is the keycomponent to determine the actual cash value in their appraisal report. The cash value estimate is achieved bycomparingthe subject vehicle(your vehicle)with similar comparable vehicles that have recentlysold or are currently listed for sale. By making adjustments for the differences between your vehicle and the comparable vehicles, theyadjust the saleprice to determine an adjusted actual cash value foryour vehicle. Sales comparison of similar vehicles is one approach the insurance companywill use to determine a value foryour vehicle. Theymayalso use other industry guides such as the Kelley Blue Book, Black Book or other thirdpartyservices. No matter what resource is used, they are all based on what a similar comparable vehicle will sell for in the marketplace. Therefore, theycompile sales evidence of similar vehicles. Now it may seem like you are getting a fair deal when insurance companies are using respected services like a third party valuation service, however the money you receive for your total loss vehicle will be used to replace your next vehicle. Therefore, it is critical you know if you are getting the full cash value because the payout they offer you may not be. You want to make sure you are getting the best possible price that reflects “current” market values for your vehicle in yourlocal marketplace at the time your car was considered a total loss. Every used vehicle has a range of value Just go online to Craigslist.org, Kaango.com, Autotrader.com, dealership websites or any other online classified ad website and search for the make, model and year of your vehicle in your local market.
You will quickly find out there will be a range of asking prices for the same vehicle. The prices will range due to a variety of factors such as mileage, condition, options, damage and other factors. For some vehicles the asking price range will be very narrow such as newer vehicles. For older vehicles this range can be much, much wider. For example a vehicle of 1990 vintage will range in price from being sold for parts at a very low price to above the typical market value as a fully restored vehicle. So what will the insurance company pay you? When the insurer declares your vehicle a total loss they will offer what they consider to be actual cash value for your vehicle. Not what you think is fair. Do you have to accept their offer? No. You can refuse their offer and they may stick to their offer or increase it slightly to settle the claim. The thing is insurance companies in many cases will offer you a dollar value for your total loss vehicle at the lower end of the range of actual cash value. Why would they do this? The reason is simple, insurance companies make their money by collecting your premiums... not paying your claim. They lose money when they pay an insurance claim. TheInsurance Company’s OfferOnce the insurance company gives you a dollar offer, you will want to find out how they arrived at this amount. Did they get a third party independent vehicle appraisal, use Kelley Blue Book or The Canadian Black Book or did they conduct their own appraisal? No matter what method they use you want to get all the information in writing. If they have a written appraisal, get a copy. Kelly Blue Book and the Canadian Black Book
These websites allow you to determine an average market price for most vehicles on their websites for free. Remember this is an “average” price based on thousands of car sales and not necessarily the real actual cash value of your vehicle in your marketplace. The cash value of your vehicle may be higher or lower than the average. However, if the average price provided by these services supports your opinion of value, print the webpage to use as evidence the insurance company’s offer is too low.Finding and Selecting Comparable Vehicles The process of finding and selecting comparable vehicle sales is of critical importance to supporting your opinion of cash value. You want to start your search for comparable vehicles by going to Craigslist.org, Kaango.com, Autotrader.com, dealership websites or any other online classified ad website that lists vehicles for sale. You can even use local news papers. The most relevant comparables are those that are of the same year, make and model as your vehicle. It is also best to find vehicles with similar options, mileage and overall physical condition to reduce the need for making adjustments. When you find good comparisons in your local market, print them. Once you have collected 3 to 4 good comparable vehicles, you will be using them as evidence to give the insurance company. Make sure you make two copies, one for you and one for the insurance company.
Notes on Condition - Determining Vehicle Condition
Opinion on a vehicle’s condition will varyfrom person to person and between seller and buyer. Condition will also play a factor in how much the insurer will offer in terms of cash for a total loss vehicle. It is important you be objective and not emotional. You must be reasonable with your estimate of condition to support your opinion of cash value. The following are some guidelines to help you choose vehicles that would be considered similar in condition.
Excellent Condition
This category is predominately for new vehicles. Older vehicles can fall into this category if they have been exceptionally maintained and cared for. Most vehicles that are less than new will not fall into this category. Basically, a vehicle is considered to be in excellent condition if the vehicle looks new on the exterior and interior. It also has never needed bodywork or repainting. In addition, it is in excellent running condition with no need for repairs. The mechanical condition will be backed up with proof of regular maintenance and service records.
Good Condition
This category is more common for vehicles that have been well cared for but not in excellent condition. The vehicle will show signs of minor wear and tear or touch-ups. This does not include any minor rust or required bodywork. Essentially, minimal reconditioning is required. To be considered in good condition the vehicle still is required to be in excellent mechanical condition supported by service records.
Average Condition
Average condition is where most used vehicles will be categorized. These vehicles will show signs of normal wear and tear for their age. In most cases, the vehicle may have some of the following, minor rust, small digs, scratches or dents, paint touch-up and minor interior wear. Mechanically, the vehicle runs well but may have some minor fluid leaks or be in need of a tune-up. Ideally, some service records will be available to show some history of maintenance and routine servicing.
Fair
This category is for vehicles that definitely require work in terms of cosmetic appearance and/or mechanical operation. Cosmetically, the vehicle shows signs on the interior and exterior of wear and tear to the point of needing reconditioning, repair or replacement. The
interior may have missing components, cracks and/ or tears. Repairable rust, dents and scratches are common. Mechanically, there will be fluid leaks and also may require mechanical repairs. What if the insurance company rejects your opinion of cash value? This could happen if your comparable vehicles are not very comparable, range widely in price or appear to be in superior condition. The best way to overcome these objections is to do your best to select comparable vehicles that are highly similar to your vehicle with a narrow price range and describe their condition to where it is easy to make the comparison. Backing up your opinion of cash value with direct evidence is far superior to just “saying” you believe your vehicle is worth more than the insurance company is offering. Rememberwords are cheap, evidence is PROOF! Best wishes for a successful outcome, Joseph Broderick PS - If you really want to hit the insurance company with some rock solid hard evidence for the highest possible cash value payout, you will definitely want to pick up a copy of my Total Loss Cash Recovery system. This easy to use system will put you on the same paying field as the insurance company with your very own actual cash value appraisal report. Learn more about the Total Loss Cash Value Recovery systemClick Here.