“Any Person ... Any Study” within One University
290 Pages
English
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“Any Person ... Any Study” within One University

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290 Pages
English

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9 Feb 2011 – 6.3.5 Postdoctoral Fellows ......................................................... 154 ...... 29 http://www.cornell.edu/reimagining/docs/aap-summary-1109.pdf ...... 37 For more information see http://www.research.cornell.edu/VPR/Policies/default.html. ...... In the wake of the 2007 Virginia Tech tragedy, Cornell's strategic approach ...

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              “Any Person ... Any Study” within One University       Comprehensive Self‐Study Report submitted to the   Middle States Commission on Higher Education  February 9, 2011        Executive Summary “Any Person … Any Study” within One University Self-Study for the Middle States Commission on Higher Education Submitted by Cornell University February 9, 2011   This comprehensive self‐study of Cornell University, undertaken a decade  after the previous Middle States accreditation, takes as its theme the  productive tension between Cornell’s historical (and still cherished) goals  of accessibility and breadth and its need to function with unity, focus, and  efficiency. As we measure the university by the commission’s standards,  we find several essential facts or major developments of recent years to be  especially relevant:    Cornell’s thorough and focused 2010 Strategic Plan;    the longstanding decentralization of academic and various other  responsibilities;    Cornell’s character as the land grant university of New York State;    the university’s responses to the national economic downturn,  including immediate measures as well as bold changes to create  long‐term savings in administrative costs;    the approaching retirement of a large proportion of the faculty and  Cornell’s proactive response;    the commitment to need‐blind admissions and need‐based  financial aid;   Executive Summary i  ongoing efforts to improve our students’ living‐learning experience  and to continue or establish means of assessing the quality of  student learning.  We introduce Cornell in our first chapter, outlining fundamental facts  about the university and its individual colleges, describing  transformational initiatives of the past decade, and explaining the external  context that led to “Reimagining Cornell,” a comprehensive self‐ examination culminating in the 2010 Strategic Plan. Chapter 2 briefly  explains our approach to the Middle States self‐study.  The first three Middle States standards (Mission and Goals; Planning,  Resource Allocation, and Institutional Renewal; and Institutional Resources) are  examined in chapter 3, “Institutional Stewardship.” After examining  Cornell’s strategic planning process and outcome, we discuss the functions  of planning, resource allocation, and renewal, and then describe the  university’s revenues, expenses, budgeting, and related areas. We also  discuss changes brought about by the global financial crisis. We  recommend developing a more coordinated approach to planning, to be  achieved along the lines described in the 2010 Strategic Plan. We also  recommend further planning for the refurbishment of campus facilities  and for campus development as prescribed in the Campus Master Plan.  In chapter 4 we address standards 4 (Leadership and Governance), 5  (Administration), and 6 (Integrity). Here we outline Cornell’s administrative  and governance structures as well as policies related to integrity and  ethical conduct. We take note of several changes in recent years that have  centralized certain functions of the university, and we recommend that  Cornell continue on this path, so long as doing so does not jeopardize the  academic missions of the colleges. We also recommend clarification of the  roles of the assemblies, continued momentum on administrative cost‐ saving measures, and full implementation of an in‐process change in  management of conflicts of interest.  Chapter 5 considers standards 8(Student Admissions and Retention) and 9  (Student Support Services). We first examine admission policies, enrollment  targets, and recruitment of underrepresented minorities. Next, we  consider graduation and completion rates, advising, career services,  ii Executive Summary psychological services, residential life, and other aspects of student well‐ being, as well as grievance policies and privacy protections. We endorse  need‐blind admissions and competitive packages of need‐based financial  aid, recommend further attention to the retention and success of  underrepresented minorities, and suggest that Cornell reconsider the  recent policy of allowing applicants to choose an alternate college. We also  offer recommendations concerning fostering student health and well‐ being, find room for improvement in academic advising and career  services, and suggest that Cornell examine housing issues related to  transfer admission.  Our next chapter examines Cornell’s compliance with standard 10: Faculty,  considering the composition of the faculty, measures of excellence, the role  of non‐professorial faculty members, diversity, mentoring, tenure, and  other issues. We endorse Cornell’s proactive faculty renewal efforts and  support innovative hiring practices and efforts toward diversity. We  recommend professional development opportunities for all faculty,  including non‐professorial ones, and advise further consideration of the  role of emeritus faculty. Urging more consistent university‐wide support  for teaching, we recommend more widespread mentoring of junior faculty  and incentives for units to better integrate faculty members’ roles as  researchers, teachers, advisors, mentors, and agents of public engagement.  Finally, we recommend that the university continue to expand cross‐ campus and inter‐campus collaborations, with particular emphasis on the  social sciences and business.  “Educational Offerings,” our seventh chapter, focuses on standards 11–13:  Educational Offerings, General Education, and Related Educational Activities.  Here we examine undergraduate education, graduate and professional  programs, off‐campus study, and supporting factors such as the library,  information technology, and instructional facilities. We endorse moving  toward a more unified educational experience for undergraduates,  developing stronger ties across colleges, and minimizing obstacles that  may prevent students in one college from taking courses in another. We  also urge greater attention to the creative and performing arts as well as  data collection on undergraduate research. At the graduate level, we  recommend that Cornell examine the viability of some small graduate  fields as well as the adequacy of programs in English as a second  Executive Summary iii language. Other recommendations concern library services and the need  for improved means of supporting study abroad.  Next we address standard 14: Assessment of Student Learning in chapter 8.  Cornell’s many programs are at varying points in their progress toward  establishing and using effective assessment practices. We examine the  situation across undergraduate, graduate, and professional programs and  offer a general recommendation that Cornell ensure ample central support  for the assessment project. We also recommend that Cornell use a range of  resources for developing assessment activities, provide additional support  for assessment‐related work in the Center for Teaching Excellence, and  create fora in which units can share assessment models.  Standard 7: Institutional Assessment is discussed in chapter 9. This chapter  outlines our data collection and analysis services, our current assessment  activities, and plans for the future. We endorse the Strategic Plan’s aims  for institutional assessment and recommend addressing issues of  communication and transparency of data. We also see a need for more  data collection in two areas: (1) the links between students’ Cornell  experiences and their later careers and (2) the experiences and perceptions  of graduate and professional students.  In conclusion, we survey the highlights of our self‐study and affirm the  need for Cornell University to act as “one university” to maintain and  improve its research prominence and to enhance the undergraduate  experience.  We see administrative efficiency and academic collaboration  as means to help Cornell achieve its ambitious goals.    iv Executive Summary   “Any Person … Any Study” within One University   Table of Contents   1. Introducing Cornell University ....................................................... 1 1.1 Facts About Cornell ......................................................................... 1 1.1.1 Mission ................................................................................ 2 1.1.2 Vision ................................................................................... 2 1.1.3 Cornell’s Colleges and Schools ............................................. 3 1.1.4 Cornell’s Leadership ............................................................ 11 1.2 Transformational Initiatives of the Last Decade ........................ 12 1.2.1 Undergraduate Residential Initiatives .................................. 12 1.2.2 Financial Aid Initiatives ....................................................... 14 1.2.3 New Life Sciences Initiative ................................................. 15 1.2.4 “Far Above”: The Campaign for Cornell ............................. 16 1.2.5 Other Initiatives .................................................................. 17 1.3 The External Context and “Reimagining Cornell” ..................... 19 1.4 “Any Person … Any Study” within One University .................... 25 2. Approach to Self Study ................................................................ 27 2.1 Organization of the Self-Study Process ...................................... 27 2.1.1 The Working Groups .......................................................... 30 2.1.2 The Steering Committee ..................................................... 31 2.2 “Any Person … Any Study” within One University .................... 32   3. Institutional Stewardship ............................................................. 35 Standard 1: Mission and Goals Standard 2: Planning, Resource Allocation, and Institutional Renewal Standard 3: Institutional Resources 3.1 Mission, Vision, and Goals ........................................................... 36 3.1.1 An “Overarching Aspiration” ............................................. 38 3.1.2 Strategic Planning in Academic and Administrative Units .... 40 3.2 Planning, Resource Allocation, and Institutional Renewal ........ 41 3.3 Institutional Resources ................................................................. 46 3.3.1 Revenues ........................................................................... 46 3.3.2 Expenses ............................................................................ 49 3.3.3 Assets ................................................................................ 52 3.3.4 Comparison to Other Institutions ........................................ 53 3.3.5 Financial Planning and Budgeting ....................................... 54 Table of Contents v 3.3.6 Campus Master Plan .......................................................... 57 3.3.7 Auditing ............................................................................. 57 3.3.8 Facilities Resources ............................................................. 58 3.3.9 Human Resources .............................................................. 60 3.3.10 Information Technology ..................................................... 63 3.4 Recommendations ........................................................................ 64 3.4.1 Planning, Resource Allocation, and Institutional Renewal .... 64 3.4.2 Institutional Resources ........................................................ 65    4. Integrity, Governance, and Administration ................................ 67 Standard 4: Leadership and Governance Standard 5: Administration Standard 6: Integrity 4.1 Leadership and Administration ................................................... 68 4.1.1 Board of Trustees ............................................................... 68 4.1.2 University Assemblies .......................................................... 71 4.1.3 The Assemblies and Shared Decision Making ...................... 73 4.1.4 Administration ................................................................... 75 4.1.5 Policy Development ............................................................ 76 4.1.6 Selection and Evaluation of Leadership ............................... 77 4.1.7 Communication ................................................................. 78 4.2 Integrity ........................................................................................ 80 4.2.1 Ethical Conduct Policies ...................................................... 80 4.2.2 Enforcement Efforts ........................................................... 82 4.3 Recommendations ........................................................................ 86 4.3.1 Leadership and Administration ........................................... 86 4.3.2 Integrity ............................................................................. 87   5. Student Admissions and Supports .............................................. 89 Standard 8: Student Admissions and Retention Standard 9: Student Support Services 5.1 Admissions and Enrollment Management .................................. 90 5.1.1 Management of Undergraduate Enrollment Targets ............ 92 5.1.2 “Alternate College” Admissions: Impacts, Risks, and Benefits ................................................ 92 5.1.3 Policies on Transfer Students: Current and Future ............... 93 5.1.4 Early Decision in Admissions ............................................... 94 5.1.5 Communicating Information about Tuition and Financing .. 95 5.1.6 Admission and Retention of Graduate and Professional Students ................................... 96 vi Table of Contents 5.2 Supporting a Diverse Student Body ............................................ 99 5.2.1 Need-Blind Admissions and Need-Based Aid ....................... 99 5.2.2 Undergraduate Financial Aid Policies ................................. 101 5.2.3 Funding of Graduate Students ........................................... 103 5.2.4 Funding of Professional Students ....................................... 106 5.2.5 Recruitment Efforts for Underrepresented Minorities ......... 107 5.3 Graduation and Completion ..................................................... 111 5.3.1 Undergraduate Graduation Rates ..................................... 111 5.3.2 Completion Rates in the Graduate School ........................ 113 5.4 Advising, Well-Being, and Community 117 5.4.1 Undergraduate Advising ................................................... 117 5.4.2 Relationship between Admissions and Advising ................ 118 5.4.3 Career Services ................................................................. 119 5.4.4 Undergraduate Students: Strategies for Success ............... 121 5.4.5 Support for Students with Disabilities ............................... 123 5.4.6 Students in Trouble: Identification and Response .............. 124 5.4.7 The Role of Residences in the Student Experience ............. 127 5.5 Student Grievances and Privacy Protections ............................. 132 5.5.1 Graduate School Grievance Procedures ............................ 133 5.5.2 Access to Confidential Information: Policies, Practices, and Protections .................................... 134 5.6 Recommendations ...................................................................... 138 5.6.1 Admission and Retention .................................................. 138 5.6.2 Support ............................................................................ 138   6. The Faculty .................................................................................. 141 Standard 10: Faculty 6.1 Faculty Size and Composition .................................................... 142 6.2 Faculty Performance .................................................................. 145 6.2.1 Excellence in Research ....................................................... 145 6.2.2 Teaching ...................................................... 149 6.3 “Faculty” Broadly Understood .................................................. 151 6.3.4 Non-Professorial Academic Staff ....................................... 152 6.3.5 Postdoctoral Fellows ......................................................... 154 6.3.6 Emeritus Faculty ............................................................... 154 6.3.7 A.D. White Professors-at-Large and Rhodes Professors ..... 155 6.4 Gender, Diversity, and Work Life .............................................. 156 6.4.1 Faculty Work Life Survey ................................................... 157 6.4.2 CU-ADVANCE .................................................................. 159 6.4.3 Dual-Career Support ........................................................ 160 6.4.4 Offices Promoting Faculty Diversity ................................... 163 6.5 Faculty and University Responsibilities ..................................... 163 Table of Contents vii 6.5.1 Faculty Responsibilities ..................................................... 163 6.5.2 Institutional Support ......................................................... 164 6.5.3 Linkages ........................................................................... 170 6.6 Recommendations ...................................................................... 173 6.6.1 Faculty Composition 173 6.6.2 Faculty Roles and Professional Development ..................... 174 6.6.3 Linkages 174   7. Educational Offerings ................................................................ 175 Standard 11: Educational Offerings Standard 12: General Education Standard 13: Related Educational Activities 7.1 Undergraduate Education .......................................................... 176 7.1.1 University-Wide Learning Goals ........................................ 176 7.1.2 Learning Goals of the Colleges ......................................... 177 7.1.3 Distribution Requirements of the Colleges ........................ 181 7.1.4 Creative and Performing Arts ........................................... 182 7.1.5 Oversight of Curricula ...................................................... 184 7.1.6 The Use of Capstone Projects 185 7.1.7 Breadth of the Academic Experience ................................ 186 7.1.8 Extracurricular and Nontraditional Opportunities .............. 187 7.1.9 Undergraduate Research .................................................. 189 7.1.10 The Living-Learning Environment ...................................... 190 7.2 Graduate and Professional Study ............................................... 193 7.2.1 Graduate School ............................................................... 193 7.2.2 Teaching Assistants .......................................................... 196 7.2.3 Professional Schools in Ithaca ........................................... 198 7.2.4 Weil Cornell Medical College and Graduate School .......... 200 7.2.5 Schools’ Connections with Undergraduate Education ................................................ 202 7.3 Off-Campus Study ...................................................................... 204 7.3.1 Credit Courses and Internships ......................................... 205 7.3.2 Noncredit Internships and Work Experiences .................... 209 7.3.3 Distance Learning ............................................................. 212 7.3.4 Graduate Study Abroad ................................................... 212 7.4 Library, Information Technology, & Instructional Facilities ..... 213 7.4.1 The Cornell University Library ........................................... 213 7.4.2 Cornell Information Technologies ..................................... 216 7.4.3 Instructional Facilities ....................................................... 217 7.5 Recommendations ...................................................................... 218 7.5.1 Common Academic Experience ........................................ 218 7.5.2 Integration Across Colleges .............................................. 219 7.5.3 The Creative and Performing Arts ..................................... 219 7.5.4 Undergraduate Research .................................................. 220 viii Table of Contents