Gazette 14 Nov 05
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Gazette 14 Nov 05

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24 Pages
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14 Nov 2005 – “Hey doc, you know instead of putting us in hospitals, .... Postdoctoral researchers would receive a starting salary of £24886, an increase of ...... available at queensu.ca/vpr ..... Virginia Woolf's mournful music. 324 Ellis, 11:30 ...

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Queen’s University newspaper of record since 1969 November 14, 2005 Vol. XXXVI No. 17 QUE AZETTE Small-town The war hot shotsP9on e.coliP8 Boost support for supercomputing research group warns. REPORT CALLS FOR munications infrastructure. technologies and research find-C3.ca Association Inc. is a In a report released last week, national non-profit group of vol- ings. “This plan represents a major NATIONAL AGENCY for Canada,” says Vice-Prin- step of Discovery: The Engines in computational science, unteersC3.ca Association Inc., calls on the federal government to com- humanities and engineering that 21st Century Revolution seeks to cipal (Research) Kerry Rowe, who Canadarisksfallingbehindglob-mittolong-termfundingforirnesceluardcehsers.sIteviseraaslkingQfoureetnhesbmueilndtomnatdheeb$2y4t0hemiflelidoenrailngveosvt--PclhaanirsAutthheorsC3.Pcaansel.LoAnfgte-rRacnogne-ally if the federal government HPC and to establish a national a leadershi role in agency to sustain and further does not take p build Canada’s world-class HPC funding commitment to help ernment over the past few years ferring with national and interna-CnuortmupriuntigngH(iHgPhC)P,earfonramtiaonncaelinfrastructure.ppruorsduuecethemoprreomsitsaeteo-fof-HtPheC-atrotlaenadditnogmnaeitnwtoarikninCganaanddatselewcoorlmd--tionalexperts,weareSeneoHPwCVaL:blPeagteo2 ACOLOURFUL CONVOCATION STEPHEN WILD The academic assembly at the Oct. 28 morning convocation in Grant Hall listens as musicians perform. Honorary degree recipient, musician and songwriter Loreena McKennitt sits in the front row, second from right. Beside her are Dean of Arts and Science Robert Silverman (left) and School of Music Director Gord on Smith. Also pictured in the front row from left are Prin-cipal Karen Hitchcock, Chancellor Charles Baillie and Rector Grant Bishop. The flags at the back of the stage represent the cou ntries of origin of the university’s fall graduands. For more photos of this fall’s honorary degree recipients, see page 4. ChangingMaking sense of rankings timesIBt’ysAnoNtNsEurKpEriRsiSnHgAtWnit-iinagingenxapesrirentcewhileaalhsoma-sgrbonasesrseocrhcaarrepeofcrioadrangnhte02etir.aIpsuoytisubmle-s0n5iveurdeh versities do extremely well in the ence. Consequently, the Nov. 2, Queen’s scored A+ in 11 CFO POSITION KEY AS does well in both sur-Globe and Mail’s University universitySeeMASNEACL: Page 2 Report Card while not placing at veys. UNIVERSITY DEVELOPSomtarpihltyeousedprihlvMaanfenucaohneosahotftatohcrernraesya,ikna,sgnaelcrsnsrinwCoaysChsirehtOitutitsnInside this issue NEW FISCAL STRATEGYthnsterimaolyirpotrfoidriceo-nlaalenpnriiernsnetsaxtreicdthuaunntediCheck out the winning entries By CELIA RUSSELLsesllwelbaestyosidio.ngdhtTeentaeepcnlrmfoerputbchoanodrppaenofonsisreectuin our inaugural Snap Judgments photo contest. Queen’s has hired its first associ- very different aspects of the in the other,” Mr. Conway says. ate vice-principal (finance) and higher education experience, he In this year’s Maclean’s uni-chief financial officer. says. versity rankings issue publishedIndex Daniel Hogg, former vice-Daniel HoggMaclean’s presents one view week, Queen’s maintained a last president finance and operations of quality that is based on fifth-place standing. Since the of Toronto-based Unisys Canada chief financial officer is critical ince tion of tBulletin Board . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Inc.,assumeshisappointmentfortheuniversityatthistime,rreessoeaurrcchesparvoadiluacbtileont,otahneilenvsetiltouf-1991p,QueenshhesaesrbaenekniinngstihneCalendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 todaMyr..HoggwillreporttoVice-saysTMhre.Sciommppsloenx.ityandbreadthtoitohnerahnadndr,etphuetaGtlioobne.sOurnvetyhiestcoaptegovreyi,nthwehimchedicrale-pdroecsteonrtaslDiscovery @ Queens . . . . . . . 8 Principal (Operations and of activities across the university predicated on student satisfac- Canada’s top-tier universities.Viewpoint and Letters. . . . . . 6 Finance) Andrew Simpson and has been growing enormously, In the Globe surveFor news updates overseeabroadrangeofnon-andwiththis,sohastheneedtionTahnedssetuardeenetnetixrpeleryiednifcfee.rentintroducedin2002,Queenshasyvisit us online @ raecsapdoenmsiicbilisteyrvfiocrest,heifnicnlaundicinaglffionranmcoiralesmtarantaeggeicmaellnytfcoacpuasbeild-viewsofquality,twodifferentconsistentlyrecoeiveidotnopofmmarokrse.www.queensu.ca/newscentre managementoftheuniversity.ity.sCidoenswoafytsahyes.qualitycoin,Mr.tRheaflnec2ti6n,0g0t0heundpeirngraduates,it “The inaugural role of associ- The university needs to Queen’s has always strived to measures student satisfactionQueen’s News Centre ate vice-principal (finance) andSeeCHANGING TIMES: Page 2offer a rich undergraduate learn- with their university experience
IN THE NEWS Page 2Queen’s Gazette Shared vision integral to performing arts discussions Queen’s is involved in Queen’s feels it has a critical with the departments that could Fisher and Ireneus Zuk lobbied exploratory discussions with the partnership role to play because contribute and benefit from any to make the project a faculty pri-city and interested community of its commitment to the arts, future development. ority. members about a plan to develop the humanities and to heritage, “Our goal is to build a shared Since the music building Har-the J.K. Tett Centre on King says Principal Karen Hitchcock. vision,” says Dr. Hitchcock. “We rison-LeCaine Hall opened in Street. This would be in partner- feel there is an opportunity here 1974, there has been increasing ship with the local arts commu- for something very exciting to concern about the lack of a nity and the City of Kingston, insiucssoisniwThesedgian-rdeng performing facility. properhappen. We are also committed order to expand and enrich theare is one of a few Canadianto doing this in partnership with Queen’s performing arts at Queen’s. the community.” universities with a recognizably The university has beenand preliminary.” music program that excellentSeveral community arts and offered a generous gift of fund- cultural groups currently rent does not have a concert recital ing from long-time Queen’sKaren Hitchcock as part of its music building.space from the city in the Tett hall benefactors Alfred and Isabel “These discussions are wide- Centre at 370 King St. W. A recital hall was originally Bader in support of a new per- ranging and preliminary. This is For the School of Music and proposed in 2003 on campus, forming arts facility. an opportunity for all groups to the Faculty of Arts and Science, however the site was not consid-Space restrictions on campus share their vision for the future the idea of a new recital hall on ered to be feasible. have led the university to assess of the site. We are working to campus has been a long-time Dr. Hitchcock says she looks alternatives that would provide a develop a process for bringing aspiration. forward to further dialogue meaningful site for such pro- together key stakeholders and Over the last 30 years, former about the potential opportuni-grams as music, theatre, and providing a forum for continued School of Music directors Istvan ties for the site with the univer-film. dialogue. This includes meeting Anhalt, F.R.C. Clarke, Alfred sity, city and community groups. Macleanscontinued from page 1 categories including overall categorized into benchmark centage of students with 75 per complacency, says Vice-Principal academic reputation, reputation scores expressed in 100-point cent or higher and was also first (Academic) Patrick Deane. amongst employers, knowledge scales. for the number of awards per “One effect of the overall of faculty members and library. In two of the survey’s five full-time faculty. rankings is that quite small dif-As well, Queen’s along with 10 benchmark areas, Queen’s was The university saw improve- ferences between institutions at other universities, achieved an A rated at levels that were highly ments in the areas of student the level of the data are qualita-in overall education experience, competitive internationally. On retention, number of out-of- tively amplified. the highest mark achieved in “level of academic challenge”, province students, number ofπ“There is a good deal of that category. Queen’s ranked in the 70th per- first-year international students, compression at the high end of The Globe Report Card results centile of U.S. research-intensive number of international gradu- the rankings, which is to say that are fairly consistent with the universities and for “supportive ates, percentage of faculty with not much separates the scores of National Survey of Student campus environment” in the PhDs, and amount devoted to those ranked in the top five. For Engagement (NSSE) in which 90th percentile. student services as a percentage that reason it is less important to Queen’s also performs extremely Scores in other benchmark of budget. pay attention to the rankings well. areas, “active and collaborative themselves than to the underly--Conducted by Indiana Uni learning” and “student-facultyling data; in the latter we will versity’s Centre for Postsec- interaction,” were somewhatsfoivweneterffdiyretieneraesehTfind illuminating information ondary Research and Centre for lower at Queen’s and at otherthat can be used to improve Survey Research, NSSE has been Canadian universities. This wasquality, twowhat we do and to strengthen carried out for the past five years not unexpected as these cate-the institution.” at more than 900 higher educa- gories are more directly linked todifferent sides ofQueen’s has decided to partic-tion institutions across the U.S. funding levels, which are signifi- ipate in NSSE again in 2006, A group of Canadian schools cantly higher in the participat-the quality coin.”along with all other Ontario uni-took part in the survey for the ing U.S. universities.Chris Conwayversities, about a dozen other first time in 2004. In the latest Maclean’s report, Canadian institutions, and more NSSE quantifies items such as Queen’s maintained or improved Queen’s dropped rankings for than 600 US universities. how often students see faculty on its results in 19 of 24 cate- average entering grade, classes The survey, which launches outside of class, whether they gories. taught by tenured faculty, schol- in February, is conducted elec-receive prompt feedback from It was especially good news to arships and bursaries as a per- tronically. faculty, to what extent tests see the results continue to reflect centage of budget, library reflect course material and to the exceptional quality of acquisitions and reputation.w. t h e g l o b e a n d m a i l . c o mw w what extent course material Queen’s faculty and students, That Queen’s remains in fifth/reportcard challenges them. says Principal Karen Hitchcock. place in the Maclean’s rankings.mwwleacwinevsrtina.sacu/ies The 41 questions are then Queen’s ranked first for the per- is cause for neither alarm norwww.indiana.edu/~nsse Changing timescontinued from page 1 develop an overall fiscal strategy The new role combines the Canada Inc., a worldwide infor- the chief accountant and was that links to the university’s departments of Financial Opera- mation technology services and the point finance person for strategic plan, says Mr. Simpson. tions & Systems, Financial solutions company. numerous business units. He was “From that we need to develop a Analysis and Budget and Pur- His non-financial roles also responsible for financial new budget model, implement a chasing and Investment Services included an appointment in planning and reporting for the new financial system, review under the leadership of an asso- product marketing, managing Canadian entity. Before his financial policies and provide ciate vice-principal. the Unisys Canada supplies busi- appointment at Unisys Canada, guidance for the financing of the A graduate of the University ness and managing the Unisys he worked as a staff account-large level of capital reinvest- of Toronto, Mr. Hogg spent the solutions delivery group. In ant/consultant for Ernst and ment that the university last 19 years progressing through finance, Mr. Hogg was responsi- Young, (formerly Clarkson Gor-requires.” a series of roles within Unisys ble for systems conversions, was don).
HPCVLcontinued from page 1 present to the Canadian public a IMPACT Canada, would be respon-compelling case for the economic sible for coordinating facilities, benefits and research opportuni- advising Canadian funding agen-ties that will be generated from a cies, developing awareness and commitment in this area ” training programs and promoting . “At a time when we are seeing international collaboration. increasing demands for the prod- HPC is broadly defined as the ucts of high performance com- use of “supercomputers” for puting, the collaborative research in such areas as drug approach of C3.ca is not only development, astrophysics, aero-desirable, it is essential,” says space, financial modeling, dis-Andrew Pollard, (Mechanical and ease containment and Materials Engineering) a found- nanotechnology. ing member and past president C3.ca was founded to serve of C3.ca, and a founding mem- the needs of HPC user commu-ber and principal investigator of nity from across Canada, High Performance Computing embraces universities, colleges, Virtual Laboratory (HPCVL) at industry and government and is Queen’s. “Every university in supported in part through mem-Canada that isn’t already criti- bership fees and significant con-cally dependent on HPC will be tributions by the National in the future as we move into Research Council. this exciting new age of discov-ery and learning.”www.c3.ca/LRP A proposed new national entity,www.hpcvl.org
November 14 , 2005
QUEENS GAZETTE Editor Celia Russell 613-533-6000 ext.74498 gazette@post.queensu.ca Senior Communications Officer Nancy Dorrance 613-533-2869 dorrance@post.queensu.ca Communications Officer Lorinda Peterson 613-533-3234 petersn@post.queensu.ca Director of Communications and Public Affairs Anne Kershaw 613-533-6000 ext.74038 kershaw@post.queensu.ca Advertising Coordinator Ying Gilbert 613-533-6000 ext.75464 advert@post.queensu.ca Production Creative Services Queen's Gazette Online: qnc.queensu.ca/gaz_online.php Queen’s News Centre: www.queensu.ca/newscentre The Queen's Gazette is published on the second and fourth Monday of each month (Tuesday if Monday is a holiday), and normally monthly in the summer and December by the Department of Marketing and Communications, 307 Fleming Hall, Queen's University, Kingston, ON K7L 3N6. Submissions are welcome, but the Gazette reserves the right to edit and print contributions as space and time permit. Subscriptions are $30 per year. E D I T O R I A L S C H E D U L E Noon deadline Publishing date 21 November 28 November 5 December 12 December ADVERTISING POLICY The Queen’s University Gazette is a newspaper published by the University’s Department of Marketing and Communi-cations (“Publisher”) for the primary pur-pose of internal communication to its faculty and staff members. All advertising is subject to the Pub-lisher’s approval. The Publisher reserves the right to revise, reject, discontinue or omit any advertisement, or to cancel any adver-tising contract, for reasons satisfactory to the Publisher without notice and without any claim for penalty. The Publisher does not accept liability for any loss or damage caused by any error in accuracy in the printing of an advertisement beyond the amount paid for the space actually occupied by that portion of the advertisement in which the error occurred. The advertiser agrees to indemnify the Publisher for any losses or costs incurred by the Publisher as a result of publishing any advertisement, which is libelous or mislead-ing, or otherwise subjects the Publisher to liability. The Publisher may insert the word “advertisement” above or below any copy. The Publisher requires that any advocacy advertisement identify the advertiser plac-ing the ad. The Publisher will not knowingly pub-lish any advertisement which is illegal, mis-leading or offensive to its readers. The Publisher will not knowingly pub-lish any advertisement which violates the University’s internal policies, equity/human rights policies or code of conduct. Further, the Publisher will not publish any advertise-ment which contravenes the best interests of the University directly or indirectly.
IN THE NEWS November 14, 2005Queen’s GazettePage 3 Town hall explores how to broaden learning By KAY LANGMUIR or graduates? he asked. ates, let the students do it,” said a and able to appreciate diversity, he bewhose discussion paper on a Keen to discuss the future of future direction for Queen's was said. faculty member. A life-sciences professor Queen’s, the university commu- released earlier this fall, said Another faculty member The reverse would also be help- advised that research and educa-nity raised issues of diversity, afterwards she was delighted agreed, but went further, saying ful, another faculty member said. tion must go hand in hand, and global involvement, Western with the wonderful response. that students must be given “the In addition to encouraging student cited the University of Waterloo’s biases, extra-curricular learning, “It was great, a thoughtful experience of thinking in ways involvement in the larger world, co-op program as an example of and broadly based academics at contribution to the process, and that other people think.” the university should encourage how students can enrich their the principal’s most recent it was great to see students as This means questioning the mature Kingston-area residents to learning through direct experi-Engaging the World town hall well as staff being part of the biases in a curriculum that take classes at Queen’s by being ence in the outside world. meeting. process,” she said. strongly reflects its white West- flexible enough to allow them to The Nov. 8 meeting was the Moderators Vice-Principal Many people responded to ern culture, she said. work toward degrees at their own third of four in a series of meetings (Academic) Patrick Deane and her contention that curriculum An English professor noted pace. This would enrich the class- to allow the community to respond Faculty of Law Dean Bill Flana- needs to be a major part of the that Queen’s needs more faculty room atmosphere, she said. to the principal’s discussion paper. gan were kept busy by a steady discussion by saying that the “who can teach diversely.” It’s Others spoke of global The next meeting takes place on stream of staff, students and fac- learning experience needs to be surprising, for example, that engagement – of partnering or Wednesday, Nov. 30 from 11 am to ulty from an audience of about broadened. Queen’s has no department of somehow assisting struggling 12:30 pm in room 202 Policy Stud-60 stepping up to comment on A student suggested more Arabic or anthropology, she said. universities in the developing ies. how Queen’s curriculum and interdisciplinary projects. One Several speakers also addressed world. One faculty member sug- About 75 people attended the pedagogy could best support the department head suggested that the importance of the out-of-class gested the university work with second town-hall meeting, development of well-rounded degrees were overly specialized experience in developing globally immigrant groups in Canada to which took place Oct. 26 at the world citizens. and that students might benefit minded citizens and leaders, but offer scholarships to students School of Business in Goodes “There’s absolutely no short- from a loosening of the degree some warned the university must from the home countries. Hall. Business school Dean David age of lively ideas,” Prof. Flana- requirements to encourage them be careful to encourage extra-cur- Queen’s needs to determine Saunders took part with Principal gan observed at the end of the to choose a variety of courses. ricular activity without attempt- where its focus should be “because Hitchcock and Vice-Principal 90-minute meeting in Kingston Students must not only have ing to manage it. we’re too small to be everything,” (Academic) Patrick Deane. Hall Nov. 8. technical skills, but they must be “I think we need to present one professor noted. Will thea / p r i n c i p a lw w w. q u e e n s u . c Principal Karen Htichcock, able to read, write and think, and more resources and then back off focus be research, or undergradu-/lookingahead
“Shush” no longer part of Bracken Library vocabulary NS to the room’s flexibility. their teaching material and portterminals at stand-up tables, ver-RENOVATIO , NEWtsarentstudenuBylhttnoeehTtivanoindytusveeclasapsaioshwnatsoym,cronntCeresatiaselrotwarfteciegleev.osls,onsrktita FEATURES AT BRACKEN benefiting. The renovation ones Health Education Electronic of can’t just put it on the “Youlounge-style seating, and separate ENCOURAGE GROUPmoupcwousrdtcnneieshdeub(tCsmooRreosktord.saMnrir-atrnetapEsaHcsRtEpa.es)egMxlnfhetroetnch-atyssadaht,egdelwonkresoalnecreiedulasedivoc-o tions, the productive chatter of use it,” says Ms. Maranda. “Fac- ing room that helps the library student groups is a planned part t. ulty have to integrate it into their carry out its duties as the library LEARNINGnmabilaahiereataTmhenecser.ugianud-ssterfereetdd-twsoarekis-sranriyhtluiobtehlt,cyorrnetufCorsefolohevarlaspstitheranosntiekiyillitifca By KAY LANGMUIR ingquiet study area is one floor dents on building its collection of ern to it.” Ontario. Bracken staff mem-below. teaching software for the centre For example, one piece of bers help teach the staff at these Students no longer complain Group work is an increasingly in conjunction with faculty. software already in the collection hospitals how to search for and about noise on the newly reno- important part of health-sciences “There’s a big need, especially is a 3D-anatomy program that purchase required resources such vated main floor of Bracken education, says Ms. Maranda. in medicine, to reduce the num- allows students to view any part as books, journals and databases Library in Botterell Hall. “You can’t learn on your own ber of lectures,” she says. of the body at any angle or and how to use them. The video It’s now known as the “noisy anymore. You learn from your One way to do this is to use depth, from bones to muscle and conferencing room will help staff floor” – specially designed to colleagues. So that’s why we electronic software to introduce other soft tissue structures. reduce the amount of travel meet the increasing need in designed this very flexible open material to students prior to lec- Professors, librarians and other required to service these hospi-health sciences for group work space,” she says. “We really try to tures and then use scheduled time instructors or groups can also use tals, particularly during times of and greater computer access. emphasize the need for group with faculty to confer and review the centre’s e-laboratory, where bad weather, says Ms. Maranda. Before the renovation, “We work. the subject matter, impart con- an electronic podium and laptop- The video-conference room is would see them sitting on the “The students are very happy text, and discuss how it relates to equipped seats allow an instruc- also available to faculty who floor in groups,” says Suzanne about it. They love the seating. patients, Ms. Maranda explained. tor to overwrite notations on a need to stay in touch with the Maranda, head of Bracken They love the study rooms.” Part of the duties of a new screen image shared with the hundreds of medical students Library. Students also used to “Now you come here and staff member joining the Bracken class, then capture the work to who are on clinical placements complain to staff about the noise bring your food and drink, what- in December will be to work with use later, for example, as a start- outside of Kingston, she added. from groups talking among ever you want, as long as you’re faculty to develop the library’s ing point for the next lecture. themselves. not sitting at one of our software collection by determin- Wheeled furniture and three ceil-For an update on changes at Stauffer Now, with banks of computer machines with it.” ing what software can best sup- ing-mounted viewing screens addLibrary, see Books and Bytes, page 7.