Graduate Program Review Self-Study Report Department of ...
100 Pages
English
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Graduate Program Review Self-Study Report Department of ...

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100 Pages
English

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Brian Applegate NRSA individual postdoctoral fellowship, Duke University 2004. NRSA institutional ..... Program web site (http://mba.tamu.edu) contains more detailed ...... David, Fredegusto Humphrey Post Doc, Texas A&M University ..... Sharkawy, VPR at Guidant (a $37B medical device company) on our advisory board ...

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Texas A&M University College Station, Texas Graduate Program Review Self-Study Report January 28 – 31, 2007 Department of Biomedical Engineering 337 Zachry Building, MS 3120 College Station, Texas 77843-3120 2 TABLE OF CONTENTS I. PREFACE ................................................................................................................................. 3 A. Welcome from the Department Head ........................................................................... 3 B. Charge to the Review Committee.................................................................................. 3 C. Review Committee Agenda ............................................................................................ 4 II. INTRODUCTION ................................................................................................................... 6 A. Texas A&M University ..................................................................................................... 6 B. Dwight Look College of Engineering............................................................................. 8 III. THE DEPARTMENT............................................................................................................ 9 A. A Brief History 9 B. Mission and Vision ......................................................................................................... 10 C. Administrative Structure ................................................................................................ 11 D. Advisory Board ............................................................................................................... 12 E. Faculty.............................................................................................................................. 12 F. Undergraduate Student Body....................................................................................... 19 G. Facilities and Laboratories ........................................................................................... 21 IV. THE GRADUATE PROGRAM.......................................................................................... 23 A. Degrees ........................................................................................................................... 23 B. Admissions ...................................................................................................................... 32 C. Curriculum ....................................................................................................................... 34 D. Enrollment Statistics ...................................................................................................... 41 E. Graduation Statistics 42 F. Graduate Student Placement 45 V. FINANCIAL INFORMATION ............................................................................................ 47 A. External Research Funding ......................................................................................... 47 B. Whitaker Foundation Special Opportunity Grants: .................................................. 49 C. Departmental Funding – Annual Operating Budget ................................................ 49 D. Graduate Student Support........................................................................................... 49 E. Departmental Endowments 51 VI. A VIEW TO THE FUTURE ............................................................................................... 52 A. The Biomedical Engineering Field & Strategic Assessment of the Department. 52 B. Challenges and Opportunities .................................................................................... 53 C. Expectations and Goals for the Department of Biomedical Engineering.......... 54 D. Future Strategies........................................................................................................... 55 APPENDIX A - Faculty Curriculum Vitae .............................................................................. 61 APPENDIX B - Graduate Courses............................................................................................ 94 3 I. PREFACE A. Welcome from the Department Head The Department of Biomedical Engineering welcomes you to Texas A&M University and thanks you for your service as external reviewers of our graduate program. We are pleased to have this opportunity to assess our program and look for opportunities to continue to improve and enhance it. We realize that a strong graduate program is a key part of creating and maintaining an excellent department and in establishing and enhancing our academic reputation. Thus, we are grateful for your help in this process. This self-study report was prepared for this review and reflects an evaluation of the graduate program. It includes a brief history and background of the university, college, and the department, including information on our faculty, students, and facilities. It provides details of the graduate curriculum and information about the program. Research areas within the department are presented and an internal assessment and overview of future plans are provided as direction for the program. Although this review is part of a periodic review of all Texas A&M University graduate programs, this type of review offers an excellent opportunity to identify ways to maintain the current high standards of the programs and to learn from review team members’ experiences with similar programs. Thus we look forward to your feedback and await your recommendations about how we might improve our program as we strive for excellence. We realize this is a time-consuming task and thank you again for your service. We will be glad to answer any questions you might have and provide any additional information you might need. B. Charge to the Review Committee We request that the review team examine the graduate program within the Department of Biomedical Engineering using the materials provided, along with any additional information you might request. While evaluating the existing program, please consider the allocation of resources (e.g. human and fiscal) within the department, the level of support the department receives from the university, and comment as appropriate on current and potential “leveraging” of these resources. 4 C. Review Committee Agenda Sunday, January 28 4:30 pm Everyone needs to arrive no later then 4:30 PM and will be met and escorted to Reveille Inn 7:00 pm Dinner at Bell Ranch Steakhouse with the review team, Dr. Coté and select faculty. (Dr. Coté will escort to Bell Ranch Steakhouse and then back to Reveille Inn) Monday, January 29 7:30-8:30 am Entry meeting with David Prior, Provost, Rick Giardino, Dean of Graduate Studies, Jack Vitek, Assistant Dean, Office of Graduate Studies, and Jim Calvin, Executive Associate Vice President for Research at The Reveille Inn. Continental breakfast served. Dr. Prior provides charge and institutional perspective to reviewers. (Dr. Coté will meet review team at 8:30am; escort them to next meeting location). 8:30 am Reviewers escorted from Reveille Inn to 301 Wisenbaker 9:00-10:30 am Meet with Kemble Bennett, Vice Chancellor and Dean of Engineering, & John Niedzwecki, Executive Associate Dean, (Deans office WERC) Dr. Cote will escort back to Zachry 10:45-11:45 am Meeting with Dr. Coté for general department overview 12:00-1:30 pm Lunch: Mi Cocina’s catered (with BMEN Graduate Students) BMEN Conference Room for presentations 2:00-5:00 pm Department Time (to include presentations and/or tours) BMEN Conference Room for presentations 5:30-7:30 pm Dinner at Cenare’s with Dr. Coté and select faculty 8:00-10:00 pm Work session for review team Tuesday, January 30 7:30-8:30 am Continental Breakfast furnished by The Reveille Inn Dr. Coté will escort to campus 5 9:00 am Department Time (to include tours and/or presentations) BMEN Conference Room for presentations 12:00-1:15 pm Lunch at University Club with engineering department heads 1:30 pm Department Time (to include tours and presentations) BMEN Conference Room for presentations 3:00 pm Reviewer escorted to Reveille Inn to work on final report (Reveille Inn) 6:00-9:30 pm Dinner catered to workroom at Reveille Inn; work session for reviewers to continue draft report for exit meeting and debriefings Wednesday, January 31 7:30-9:00 am Exit meeting with David Prior, Vice Provost, Rick Giardino, Dean of Graduate Studies, Jack Vitek, Assistant Dean, Office of Graduate Studies and John Niedzwecki, Executive Associate Dean of Engineering at The Reveille Inn. Continental breakfast served. Reviewers present summary of their on-site review. Dr. Coté will escort to 337D Zachry 9:30 am Reviewers debrief Dr. Coté, 337D Zachry 10:30 am Reviewers debrief faculty, staff, and students (Room 342) 11:30-12:45 am Lunch: Jason’s Deli catered w/ Drs. Coté, Humphrey, Moore, Fernandez & Mr. Jackson. BMEN Conference Room 1:00 pm Reviewers escorted to Easterwood Airport 2:00 pm Reviewers depart 6 II. INTRODUCTION A. Texas A&M University Texas A&M University, which attracted a mere six students when it opened in 1876, is now among the largest institutions of higher learning in the nation—with a student body of about 43,000. Texas A&M University serves as the flagship of a 10 University / 8 State Agency System that includes the Texas Engineering Experiment Station, the research arm of the Dwight Look College of Engineering, and the Health Science Center, which includes the Colleges of Medicine and Dentistry. Texas A&M University alone consists of 10 colleges, including Engineering, Science, and Veterinary Medicine. The University ranks among the top five universities in attracting high-achieving National Merit Scholars. Its students include men and women of all races, religions, and backgrounds from all 50 states and more than 100 other countries and it ranks among the top producers of engineering degrees granted to minorities. Teaching and research go hand in hand at Texas A&M as it carries out its commitments as a land-, sea-, and space-grant institution—one of a select few universities to hold all three federal mandates. Its investment in research places it high in rankings by the National Science Foundation and other federal agencies. The university’s research endeavors are complemented by a strong and growing graduate education program. The Look College of Engineering also ranks among the top 5 in the nation in research expenditures and Texas A&M also ranks in the top 10 in its endowment ($2.5B). Each year, Texas A&M's 2,500 faculty conduct approximately $500 million worth of sponsored research projects, assisted by more than 5,000 paid graduate students. Additionally, approximately 3,000 undergraduates each year conduct independent research with faculty supervision. Research at Texas A&M is about faculty and students; it is driven by the spirit of discovery and is committed to pushing back the boundaries of knowledge. At the same time, the majority of the work is dedicated to solving real-world problems and improving the lives of the public we serve. Enrollment, Faculty Reinvestment, and University Commitment to Growth Table 1 shows the student enrollment numbers by College for the University for 2005. Also listed are the faculty enrollment numbers for 2004. University President, Dr. Robert Gates, has infused the campus with tremendous excitement with the announcement in 2003 that Texas A&M will hire ~440 new faculty members (112 of these lines are in engineering) within 5 years, as depicted by College in Table 2. Further, he announced a $1B Capital Campaign, which reached more than half its goal before going public and which is currently over $1.3B; with the University of Texas, he obtained first ever approval for A&M to increase revenue by setting our own tuition; and he announced a long term Master Plan to add 50 new buildings over the next decades, the first of which will 7 be a $100M Interdisciplinary Life Science Building, to be followed soon thereafter by two physics buildings and two engineering buildings. Table 1. Enrollment by College College Students Faculty (2005) (2004) Agriculture 6163 393 Architecture 1762 162 Business Admin 4886 174 Education 5339 289 Engineering 8836 569 G. Bush School of Govt 200 25 Geosciences 751 194 Liberal Arts 6934 666 Science 2870 624 Veterinary Medicine 2607 106 General Studies/Special 4230 -- Populations TOTAL 44578 3202 Table 2. Faculty Reinvestment by College College Faculty Agriculture 46 Architecture 18 Business Admin 34 Education 32 Engineering 112 G. Bush School of Govt 8 Geosciences 23 Liberal Arts 64 Science 70 Veterinary Medicine 37 Libraries 3 TOTAL 447 8 B. Dwight Look College of Engineering The Dwight Look College of Engineering at Texas A&M University is the largest engineering college in the nation, with more than 9,700 students and twelve departments – Aerospace Engineering, Biomedical Engineering, Biological and Agricultural Engineering, Chemical Engineering, Civil Engineering, Computer Science, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Engineering Technology and Industrial Distribution, Industrial and Systems Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Nuclear Engineering and Petroleum Engineering. In 2005, U.S. News & World Report ranked the Texas A&M Engineering graduate program tied for 14th among 185 U.S. universities and the undergraduate program 17th among 181 U.S. universities. Texas A&M Engineering was ranked first in the nation in the latest Hispanic Outlook survey of America's schools. The Engineering faculty includes seven university Distinguished Professors. Among the senior faculty are holders of 32 endowed chairs and 50 endowed professorships. Eighteen are members of the National Academy of Engineering. Enrollment Table 3 shows enrollment numbers for the college, with the number of Ph.D. students shown separately (~10%). Table 3. Enrollment by Department Department Students Faculty PhD Aerospace 682 34 38 Biological and Agricultural 365 20 18 Biomedical 424 15 30 Chemical 604 32 67 Civil 1408 67 133 Computer Science 919 47 167 Electrical and Computer 1245 63 181 Engineering Tech. & Distr. 881 41 -- Industrial & Systems 430 25 65 Mechanical 1440 60 132 Nuclear 276 16 34 Petroleum 508 24 37 TOTAL 9182 444 902 9 III. THE DEPARTMENT A. A Brief History Biomedical Engineering (BME) was established as a degree granting program at Texas A&M in 1972 and it has been ABET accredited since 1977. From its inception until 2002 when it became a department the BME program was run as a semi-autonomous unit administered under the auspices of the Department of Industrial Engineering. In the late 1990s through 2002 the program had a separate Chair, 7-member faculty, curriculum, student body (~350 undergraduates and 50 graduate students), degree offerings (B.S., M.S., M.E., and Ph.D.), support staff (undergraduate advisor and secretary), and laboratory facilities. It was traditionally well known for its undergraduate program, which continues to attract excellent students (mean SAT 1275) and places them in leading medical and graduate schools, biomedical engineering companies, and government laboratories. Due to the small faculty size, need for coverage of the BME field at the undergraduate level, and since the program was housed in industrial engineering, the graduate program for BME has traditionally been much smaller. In March of 2001, the college proposed and the Board of Regents approved (July 2001) the establishment of a Department of Biomedical Engineering. In 2002, the new Department of Biomedical Engineering was created with seven faculty including William Hyman who was appointed as the interim head. In that year, the Whitaker Foundation also funded two Special Opportunity Awards (SOAs) within the Department: one in the area of Cardiovascular Mechanics and 2Mechanobiology (CVM ) written by Jay Humphrey and one in the area of Optical- Microscale Biosensing and Imaging (OMBI) written by Gerard L. Coté. The immediate goal of these two grants was to strengthen the quality and to solidify the scope of the new department, in part, with the addition of new faculty members. The long-term goal is to impact education and research at both state and national levels. Since the time the SOAs were awarded we are pleased to announce that Biomedical Engineering (BME) has been listed as a signature program within the College of Engineering and the University and, as such, was awarded 11 new tenure and tenure track faculty positions. In addition, after a national search, Gerard L. Coté was named the first Department Head in February of 2005. To date we have hired 10 new faculty, are on target in terms of faculty recruitment in the two special opportunity areas, and have opened up a third area in Biomaterials. We have maintained our undergraduate student numbers and increased our graduate student numbers to over 70. As we hire our last few faculty, and as the newer faculty ramp up their research programs, we anticipate expanding these numbers to roughly 120 graduate students with a slight increase in undergraduates to roughly 400. In addition, the quality of the graduate students has increased with a number of recent graduates accepting academic positions at strong institutions (e.g., at Rice University, Georgia Tech). 10 B. Mission and Vision The mission of the Department of Biomedical Engineering is to serve: to serve our students by providing an exciting and challenging academic environment, to serve our profession through the discovery and dissemination of knowledge, to serve our university system by facilitating and leading multidisciplinary biomedical research, to serve the growing biotechnology and biomedical device industry in Texas via technology transfer and educating the workforce. The vision of the Department of Biomedical Engineering is to be recognized as a premier engineering department by demonstrating excellence in research, education, and contributions to the engineering profession. To achieve this vision, we are committed to providing an environment that enhances the intellectual development of the faculty, staff, and students of the department. The Department of Biomedical Engineering can best fulfill its mission by achieving the following goals: • provide outstanding education and research programs in biomedical engineering that will attract the best undergraduate students and the best graduate students worldwide; • attract and retain faculty of the highest quality, and provide them with resources and opportunities to become national and international leaders in their professions; • furnish undergraduate and graduate students with opportunities to learn and practice the technical, communication, and life long learning skills necessary to be successful in their careers; The objectives of the biomedical engineering program are to produce: • High-quality graduates, with a broad-based education in engineering, life and natural sciences, who are well prepared for further graduate studies, careers in the medical device or biotechnology industries, or entry into medical or other health related professional schools. • Graduates who will become leaders in biotechnology industries, medicine, and in other public sectors. • Graduates who will apply acquired knowledge appropriately, work professionally with others, effectively communicate ideas and technical information, and continue to learn and improve their knowledge base and skills.