2.6 Tutorial
5 Pages
English
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2.6 Tutorial

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Downloading requires you to have access to the YouScribe library
Learn all about the services we offer
5 Pages
English

Description

Burlington-Edison Technology Competencies Imaging Devices Skills Tutor Imaging Devices • Use imaging devices such as projectors, scanners, digital cameras, and/or video cameras with computer systems and software. • Add graphics to documents, presentations, etc. • Practice good care and maintenance when connecting peripherals • Use basic troubleshooting skills • Use the HELP menu to gain information • Apply the use of graphics and peripherals to a classroom or job related project 1Burlington-Edison Technology Competencies Imaging Devices Skills Tutor • Use imaging devices such as projectors, scanners, digital cameras, and/or video cameras with computer systems and software. Basic Peripheral Use Peripheral: Peripherals includes any physical device that is connected to your computer and is controlled by your computer. This includes equipment that was connected to your computer when it was manufactured, as well as other equipment that you added later. Examples of Peripherals: Modems, disk drives, CD-ROM drives, printers, keyboards, scanners, digital cameras, scan converters, etc. Device Drivers and Peripherals: In order for a peripheral to work, it needs a “driver” installed on your computer. The driver acts much like a piece of software. In order to get the “driver installed” contact your computer specialist. Connecting Peripherals: It is advisable to turn off the computer before connecting the ...

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Burlington-Edison
Technology Competencies
Imaging Devices Skills Tutor




Imaging Devices

• Use imaging devices such as projectors, scanners,
digital cameras, and/or video cameras with computer
systems and software.
• Add graphics to documents, presentations, etc.
• Practice good care and maintenance when connecting
peripherals
• Use basic troubleshooting skills
• Use the HELP menu to gain information






• Apply the use of graphics and peripherals to a
classroom or job related project










1Burlington-Edison
Technology Competencies
Imaging Devices Skills Tutor

• Use imaging devices such as projectors, scanners,
digital cameras, and/or video cameras with computer
systems and software.
Basic Peripheral Use
Peripheral: Peripherals includes any physical device that is connected to your computer
and is controlled by your computer. This includes equipment that was connected to your
computer when it was manufactured, as well as other equipment that you added later.
Examples of Peripherals: Modems, disk drives, CD-ROM drives, printers, keyboards,
scanners, digital cameras, scan converters, etc.
Device Drivers and Peripherals: In order for a peripheral to work, it needs a “driver”
installed on your computer. The driver acts much like a piece of software. In order to get
the “driver installed” contact your computer specialist.
Connecting Peripherals: It is advisable to turn off the computer before connecting the
peripheral device.
Projectors: Projectors can be hooked up to a computer to display what is on your
computer screen to a wall or projector screen. This allows larger groups to view your
computer screen which is particularly helpful when giving a presentation or showing
students how to use software or complete assignments.
Scan converters: Scan converters are devices that connect the computer to a TV. They
allow the TV to display what is on your computer screen. Much like the projector, this
allows larger groups of people to view your computer screen which is particularly helpful
when giving a presentation or showing students how to use software or complete
assignments. The viewing may be limited depending on the size of your TV screen.
Capturing Images with a Sony Mavica Camera
Make sure you have a PC formatted disk (Windows). Macintosh computers can do this
under the Special menu. Choose the Erase Disk option. Macs can also read and write to
PC disks. (Note, you can use the camera to format the disk. If possible, use a computer to
format the disk, which will reduce the wear and tear on your camera.)
Put the disk into the right side of the camera. (With screen facing you)
Turn on the camera. The LCD screen should come on.
To take pictures, set the Play/Camera switch to Camera. (Newer camera may say
Play/Still/Movie)
2Burlington-Edison
Technology Competencies
Imaging Devices Skills Tutor

Point the camera at a subject. The zoom switch is in the upper right corner of the camera.
When you’re ready to take the picture, press the shutter button on the top-right of the
camera.
The word “recording” will appear on the LCD screen. Do not jerk the camera during
this process.
When a “live” picture returns to the screen, you’re ready to shoot again.
Viewing pictures using the camera
Set the Play/Camera switch to Play. The camera will automatically display your last
shot. At this point, you have two options:
View the pictures individually, shot by shot, using the arrow buttons
View thumbnails of the pictures by using the Index option.
When finished:
Turn off the camera.
Remove the disk.
Insert the disk into your computer, and have fun!
To use the Menu/Arrow Button:
Press on the top, bottom, and left/right to make choices.
down in the center of the button to select.
Note: This operation is similar to other camera types. Generally all digital cameras have a
record mode and a play mode to review the pictures. Higher end cameras also use
memory cards to store the pictures. You will need to hook the camera up to the computer
or use some type of memory reader.






3Burlington-Edison
Technology Competencies
Imaging Devices Skills Tutor

• Add graphics to documents, presentations, etc.
Save As Formats
In general, you want to use the save for use in. Files seem to be more compatible when
you do that. If you do need to perform a save as, here are the different file formats
After choosing one of these formats, click the options button to specify more details.
Format Description
BMP Windows Bitmap PhotoDraw supports all Windows and OS/2 bitmaps,
including RLE (Run Length Encoded) bitmaps and DIB (device-independent
bitmaps).
GIF Graphics Interchange Format PhotoDraw supports versions GIF87a
(including interlacing) and GIF89a (including interlacing and transparency).
When opening animated GIF files in PhotoDraw, only the first image in the
sequence is imported.
JPEG Joint Photographic Experts Group PhotoDraw supports version 6.0 of the
JFIF (JPEG File Interchange Format) but not JTIF (JPEG Tagged Interchange
Format) and CMYK (cyan-magenta-yellow-black) JPEG file formats.
MIX Microsoft Image Extensions PhotoDraw 2000 Version 2.0 supports version
1.0 and 2.0 of its native file format and can also save files in Microsoft Picture
It! MIX format (versions 2.0 through 4.0).
PCX PC Paintbrush PhotoDraw supports all versions of PCX file formats through
ZSoft Version 3.0, with support for 256-color images. This is the common
interchange format used by Microsoft Windows Paintbrush.
PNG Portable Network Graphics PhotoDraw exports all files conforming to
version 1.0 of the Portable Network Graphics Tenth Specification.
TGA Truevision Targa PhotoDraw supports all TGA file formats with up to 32
bits per pixel.
TIFF Tagged Image File Format PhotoDraw supports all TIF formats that
conform to TIFF Specification Revision 5.0 and 6.0, Part 1: Baseline TIFF,
including monochrome, grayscale, palette color, and RGB True Color images.
Single 8-bit alpha channel stored with an RGB True Color image is correctly
handled, as are CMYK images saved with the .tif extension.
The TIFF filter provided by PhotoDraw does not support multiple alpha
channels (stored as sub files) or alpha channels that don't have 8 bits per pixel.
4Burlington-Edison
Technology Competencies
Imaging Devices Skills Tutor


• Practice good care and maintenance when connecting
peripherals and Use basic troubleshooting skills
Basic Peripheral Use
Peripheral: Peripherals includes any physical device that is connected to your computer
and is controlled by your computer's microprocessor. This includes equipment that was
connected to your computer when it was manufactured, as well as other equipment that
you added later.
Examples of Peripherals: Modems, disk drives, CD-ROM drives, printers, network
adapters, keyboards, scan converters, zip drives, scanners, scan converters, digital
cameras
Device Drivers and Peripherals: In order for a peripheral to work, it needs a “driver”
installed on your computer. The driver acts much like a piece of software. In order to get
the “driver installed” contact your computer specialist.
Connecting Peripherals: It is advisable to turn off the computer before connecting the
peripheral device.
Projectors: Projectors can be hooked up to a computer to display what is on your
computer screen to a wall or projector screen. This allows larger groups of people to view
your computer screen which is particularly helpful when giving a presentation or showing
students how to use software or complete assignments.
Scan converters: Scan converters are devices that connect the computer to a TV. They
allow the TV to display what is on your computer screen. Much like the projector, this
allows larger groups of people to view your computer screen which is particularly helpful
when giving a presentation or showing students how to use software or complete
assignments. The viewing may be limited depending on the size of your TV screen.



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