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Island Medical Program Videoconferenced Lectures: Guidelines for Presentations Broadcasting a lecture to both local and distant site audiences presents some issues when planning visual support materials for a presentation. For UBC’s Undergraduate Medical Program video conferencing system, computer projection using Microsoft PowerPoint software is believed to be the most effective means for displaying (most) visuals. Following are some basic guidelines to follow when designing presentations to be used in a broadcasting environment: Type (text elements):• The size of the text on the visual needs to be large enough for the audience to clearly read (minimum size should be 30 points for text, 60 points for headings). • Visuals should have approximately 6-8 lines per slide and 6-8 words per line. Avoid complete sentences. • The text should be of sufficient contrast in color or density to stand out from the background. • The style of letter design should be crisp and clear for easy reading (i.e. Arial). • To emphasize a point, make important text a larger size, or in bold or italic type. Avoid using all upper-case letters. • If you distribute related text over two or more slides, link them by using the same title at the top of the slide with the word "Continued" after it (i.e. Drug Treatment Plan [Continued]). • When you have long bulleted lists, or charts or tables to display, see if there is a way to divide the chart into at least two ...

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Language English
Island Medical Program
Videoconferenced Lectures: Guidelines for Presentations
B
roadcasting a lecture to both local and distant site audiences presents some issues when planning visual
support materials for a presentation. For UBC’s Undergraduate Medical Program video conferencing system,
computer projection using Microsoft PowerPoint software is believed to be the most effective means for
displaying (most) visuals.
F
ollowing are some basic guidelines to follow when designing presentations to be used in a broadcasting environment:
Type (text elements):
The
size
of the text on the visual needs to be large enough for the audience to clearly read (minimum size should be
30
points for text,
60
points for headings).
Visuals should have approximately 6-8 lines per slide and 6-8 words per line. Avoid complete sentences.
The text should be of sufficient
contrast
in color or density to stand out from the background.
The style of letter design should be crisp and clear for easy reading (i.e.
Arial
).
To emphasize a point, make important text a larger size, or in bold or italic type. Avoid using all upper-case letters.
If you distribute related text over two or more slides, link them by using the same title at the top of the slide with the
word "Continued" after it (i.e.
Drug Treatment Plan [Continued]).
When you have long bulleted lists, or charts or tables to display, see if there is a way to divide the chart into at least
two parts and link them by title as above.
Color/Contrast:
The general rule on color for computerized projection is
darker background, light text
.
Shades of medium to dark
blue generally work well for background color, with correspondingly lighter colors for text.
While PowerPoint
template designs
are recommended, it is best to avoid complex, overly-detailed template designs,
or those that are "gimicky", or with strong, bright color contrasts.
Images
If you use images in your presentation, ensure they are in
JPEG format
.
GIF images may look slightly better when
displaying text, but are extremely poor at displaying images.
PowerPoint
animations
(i.e. sliding bullets, fancy slide transitions, pop-ups)
are not recommended
, unless there is
a significant learning benefit. (Animations do not always transmit smoothly over network.)
Any movie clips embedded into a PowerPoint presentation also have to be saved to a DVD as a separate file.
Scope/Expanse of Visuals:
Present no more than
20 slides per half-hour of discussion
. Showing a large number of overheads or slides to
audiences can negatively impact understanding, integration and recall of the information.
Put only key points on slides/overheads and plan to "speak from them" to fill in the related details. Use handouts for
complex graphical/statistical information and use slides/overheads as only a part of your entire instructional plan.
Timing:
Divide lectures into 10-15 minute blocks and intersperse when possible with group discussion, video clips, question
and answer sessions and demonstrations (live and virtual).
Remember: During a videoconference lecture, you can only cover about
two-thirds
of what you usually can in a live
session, so choose your content well.
Handouts/Notes:
PowerPoint automatically sets up handouts of your slides if you wish to give the students a copy of your presentation
as the handout.
(Handouts are particularly important for distributed lectures in the rare event that video
transmission goes down.
A well prepared lecture handout will allow students at remote sites to continue to follow
along with the lecture audio.
)
If you must keep a large, complex chart, table or list on one slide so that the information is small, dense, and difficult
to read at any distance, be sure to distribute a handout of the chart to the audience so they can follow the content as
you discuss it.
F
or more information on how to create effective PowerPoint presentations contact Erin Creak, Faculty Liaison, UBC Faculty of
Medicine at creak@interchange.ubc.ca or visit:
etc.health-disciplines.ubc.ca/etc_site_files/resources/tip_sheets/tip_sheet_files/powerpoint/pp_ease.pdf.