router tutorial

router tutorial

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How to set up a router to share you broadband connectionow that you've broadband at home, here's how to set up a router toconnect your Macs and PCs. Shopping for routers is quite a choreNespecially for us Mac users. Ask questions, surf the net check out Apple discussion boards, do yourhomework. If you can afford it, the Apple base station and airport cards isdefinitely the way to go. It's probably easiest to set up but bear in mind itcosts a lot more. Being a glutton for punishment and cheap, I opted for oneof those other routers whose manufacturers which don't provide any supportand documentation for Macs at all.They don't even mention Macs on theirboxes! You may see MAC on the box but…read on. One sales associate at a prominent store pointed that out on the box and wastrying to convince me that they did support Macs. Now, don't confuse thiswith MAC(all uppercase) that you might see on the boxes. MAC stands forMedia Access Control it is your computer's unique hardware number .If youwant to know more about that, click on http://www.whatis.com and typeMAC in the search fieldBelow is a picture of the router that John Schreck recommended, it was onsale at compUSA for $80. The model # is the !BEFW11S4.o you open the box take it out and as expected there are no instructionsfor Macs. On the back of the router you will find 5 RJ45 ports. OneSwill have WAN over it, the other will say LAN over it. No need toget into what that means to set this router up. ...

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How to set up a router to share you broadband connection
ow that you've broadband at home, here's how to set up a router to
connect your Macs and PCs. Shopping for routers is quite a chore
especially for us Mac users.
Ask questions, surf the net check out Apple discussion boards, do your
homework. If you can afford it, the Apple base station and airport cards is
definitely the way to go. It's probably easiest to set up but bear in mind it
costs a lot more. Being a glutton for punishment and cheap, I opted for one
of those other routers whose manufacturers which don't provide any support
and documentation for Macs at all.They don't even mention Macs on their
boxes! You may see MAC on the box but…read on.
One sales associate at a prominent store pointed that out on the box and was
trying to convince me that they did support Macs. Now, don't confuse this
with MAC(all uppercase) that you might see on the boxes. MAC stands for
Media Access Control it is your computer's unique hardware number .If you
want to know more about that, click on http://www.whatis.com and type
MAC in the search field
Below is a picture of the router that John Schreck recommended, it was on
sale at compUSA for $80. The model # is the BEFW11S4.
o you open the box take it out and as expected there are no instructions
for Macs. On the back of the router you will find 5 RJ45 ports. One
will have
WAN
over it, the other will say
LAN
over it. No need to
get into what that means to set this router up. If your Mac is already hooked
N
S
up for DSL or cable modem, unplug the RJ45 cable from the Ethernet port
and plug that into the port that says
WAN
then launch your browser. I use
Internet Explorer. There should be some directions there that tells you to
enter a number like this
http:// 192.168......
then you'll see the screen below.
If you see this on your screen,
you’re in good shape.
enerally these routers use an internet browser for setting up. Their
instructions will be similar or some variation of this. Under the
WAN connection Type, select PPPoE then enter your account name
that you got from your ISP and also the password. Then click “Apply.” The
basic setup for the router is done.
Now you need to set up your computer to obtain an IP address automatically
from the router when you plug the RJ45 cable into the Ethernet port.
G
For OS 9 users
nder the Apple Menu, go to
Control Panel
then to
TCP/IP.
You
should see a dialog box like this . Click on Configure and choose
“Using DHCP Server.” You’ll be prompted
to save. Name it something meaningful like
Linksys router
or something
that is meaningful.
And that’s it. If you have another Mac and are running OS 9, the above
directions should get you set up. All you need a a RJ45 cable to plug into
any one of the other 4
LAN
ports on the router.
U
For OS X users
nder the Apple menu select
System Preferences
then click on
Network ,
you should see this
:
Now under
Location
click on
New
. You will be prompted by a dialog box
to give this new location a name. Give it a meaningful name like
Linksys
router
. Then under the
Show
field, choose
Built-in Ethernet.
Then click the tab that says
TCP/IP
. When you click that tab you will see
you have different options than the above which shows the
PPPoE
tab being
highlighted.
U
Under
Configure
choose
Using DHCP
. Now your Mac which is running
OS X is ready to go. It will select a range of IP addresses assigned by your
router. Just plug your RJ45 cable into that computer’s Ethernet port and
you’re ready to do some web surfing.
Your Network dialog box should look like this with the name of your router
in the
Location
field
.
The Wireless Setup
ow comes the complicated part that I am struggling with. So if you
have more than one Mac and you don’t want to run wires, you will
need some sort of wireless card. I bought Apple’s airport card for
around $100.
I’ve read of cheaper alternatives but since I haven’t tried them, we’ll stick
with what I’m using. Depending on your Mac, it may or may not have a slot
for an airport card. To get instructions to install the airport card, look up
http://info.apple.com/usen/cip/
That URL is Apple’s Customer-Installable parts page where you can look up
the different upgrades you can do yourself all specific to your computer.
Some of these will link to a quicktime movie that you can download and
watch . You can download the PDF’s and print them for easier reference.
If you don’t own a powerbook but still want to connect your desktop
wirelessly, try
http://www.macsense.com
. That site might give you some
ideas. Even if you can’t connect wirelessly, you can still share your
broadband connection through RJ45 cables.
So after you have an airport card installed, you should be able to turn on
Aiport from the menu bar (in OS X) or the control strip in OS 9.
In OS X on top right hand corner you should see an icon that looks like a
fan. See the picture below.
N
Once that clear fan turns into this icon
, you’re ready to surf without
wires. If you have a laptop, you’ll be having loads of fun testing the range of
your wireless router.
On OS 9, you have to look for this on the control strip in the bottom of your
screen.
The green dots indicate signal strength. When you see that icon with the
green dots, you are ready to “cut the cord.”