TUTORIAL ABSTRACTS

TUTORIAL ABSTRACTS

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a University a a will will is er~tries a will a purposes. will will University will will research will York a University a S. University University a Pennsylvania Columbia a Colgate TUTORIAL ABSTRACTS Introduction to Computational Linguistics Recent Developments In Syntactic Theory and Their Ralph Grishman, Computational Import Anthony Kroch, of This tutorial provides general overview of computational linguistics. Topics to be considered include the components Syntactic frameworks currently under development in linguis- of natural language processing system; syntax analysis tics take different perspectives on several issues of computa- tional interest. Among these are: (1) the importance of stat- (including context-free grammars, augmented context-free ing linguistic theories in well-defined and explicit formalism grammars, grammatical constraints, and sources of syntactic whose mathematical properties are known or investigable; (2) ambiguity); semantic analysis (including meaning represen- tation, semantic constraints, quantifier analysis); and dis- the degree to which the syntatic properties of sentences can course analysis (identifying implicit information, establishing be understood independently of their semantic interpretation; and (3) the extent to which empirical and mathematical text coherence, frames, and scripts). Examples will be drawn results on parsing and generation can illuminate linguistic from various ...

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University
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will
will
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er~tries
a
will
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purposes.
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will
University
will
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research
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York
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Pennsylvania
Columbia
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Colgate
TUTORIAL ABSTRACTS
Introduction to Computational Linguistics Recent Developments In Syntactic Theory and Their
Ralph Grishman, Computational Import
Anthony Kroch, of This tutorial provides general overview of computational
linguistics. Topics to be considered include the components Syntactic frameworks currently under development in linguis-
of natural language processing system; syntax analysis tics take different perspectives on several issues of computa-
tional interest. Among these are: (1) the importance of stat- (including context-free grammars, augmented context-free
ing linguistic theories in well-defined and explicit formalism grammars, grammatical constraints, and sources of syntactic
whose mathematical properties are known or investigable; (2) ambiguity); semantic analysis (including meaning represen-
tation, semantic constraints, quantifier analysis); and dis- the degree to which the syntatic properties of sentences can
course analysis (identifying implicit information, establishing be understood independently of their semantic interpretation;
and (3) the extent to which empirical and mathematical text coherence, frames, and scripts). Examples will be drawn
results on parsing and generation can illuminate linguistic from various application areas, including database interface
issues. We shall discuss the perspectives on these and related and text analysis.
questions held by various current linguistic theories, including
generalized phrase structure grammar (GPSG), government
Natural Language Generation binding theory (GB), lexical-functional grammar (LFG), and
Kathleen McKeown, tree adjoining grammar (TAG).
In this tutorial, we begin by identifying the types of deci-
sions involved in language generation and how they differ
Current Approaches to Natural Language Semantics
from problems in the interpretation of natural language.
Graeme Hirst, of Several techniques that have been used for "surface" genera-
tion (i.e., determining the syntactic structure and vocabulary This tutorial provides survey of various computational ap-
of the generated text) be examined, including grammars, proaches to semantics--the process of determining the mean-
ing of sentence or other utterance. Issues addressed dictionaries, and templates. From there, we will move on to
include definitions of meaning; the differences between lin- other problems in language generation, including how the
system can decide what to say in given situation and how guistic theories of semantics and formalisms suitable for com-
it can order the information for inclusion in text. Here we putational understanding of language; knowledge represen-
study the constraints that have been used for these deci- tations that suitable for representing linguistic meaning; the
sions in domains such as expert systems, database systems, relationship between semantic processing and syntactic pars-
ing; and factors in choosing semantic formalism for par- scene description, and problem solving. We will also look at
ticular computational application. The approaches to seman- the interaction between conceptual decisions such as these
and decisions in surface generation, considering approaches tics that be discussed will include procedural semantics,
that propose an integrated solution. conceptual dependency, Montague semantics, and composi-
tional and knowledge-based approaches.
Structuring the Lexicon
Robert Ingria, BBN Machine Translation
Sergei Nirenburg, This tutorial will discuss the information that has been
stored in the lexicon. It first deal with the types of in- This tutorial will address the recent resurgence of interest in
formation that have typically been placed in lexical entries, machine translation (MT) in the United States, Europe, and
Japan. Topics to be discussed include the variety of objec- detailing what sorts of lexical information necessary for
natural language systems. The format of lexical entries and tives for MT systems; various research and developments
the relationships between lexical entries be considered methodologies; MT as an application area for theoretical lin-
next (as in cases of irregularly inflected forms, such "go", guistics, computational linguistics, and artificial intelligence;
"went", "gone", abbreviations and acronyms, such as "helo" environments for MT research; and selected case studies of
and "helicopter", and derived forms, such as "destroy" and projects.
"destruction"). Alternate places for storing information
also be considered (for example, regular morphological infor-
mation might be contained in individual lexical or in
the grammar). The tutorial will conclude with the implica-
tions of recent work in linguistic theory for the structure of
lexicons for computational
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