Tutorial - Graphics in Word
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Tutorial - Graphics in Word

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Large Documents in WordWord can handle large amounts of text fairly well, but often the incorporation of graphics will bogdown the system, causing corruption of the document and/or frequent crashes. Below are some tips forminimising the negative impact of graphics on your documents.Use the appropriate format.Word, by default, embeds graphics into the file. This makes it simplet to transport documents, but itcan quickly increase the file size to the point where storage and transportation is a problem and Wordhas difficulty assigning enough memory to open and edit the document. One of the ways of improvingthis situation is to use compact formats for your graphics.PhotosUse JPEG (.jpg) format. When saving the JPEG file, specify a medium quality. Word automatically blursplaced images, so any small artifacts in the image will be smeared anyway. At the final size in thedocument, the photo should never have more than 300 dots per inch, and 200 dots per inch is adequatefor most photographs. As an example, your digital camera might take photos 1024 pixels x 768 pixels.This would look fine in Word at a size of 5 x3.5 . If you only need the photo to been 2.5 x 1.75 inWord, scale the photo down to 512x384 pixels before placing it in Word. The file size will only be …what it was with the original shot.Clip Art and ScreenshotsArtwork that has areas of flat color is usually best saved as a GIF (.gif) format. Rather than pastingthem directly into Word from the ...

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Large Documents in Word Word can handle large amounts of text fairly well, but often the incorporation of graphics will bog down the system, causing corruption of the document and/or frequent crashes. Below are some tips for minimising the negative impact of graphics on your documents.
Use the appropriate format. Word, by default, embeds graphics into the file. This makes it simplet to transport documents, but it can quickly increase the file size to the point where storage and transportation is a problem and Word has difficulty assigning enough memory to open and edit the document. One of the ways of improving this situation is to use compact formats for your graphics.
Photos Use JPEG (.jpg) format. When saving the JPEG file, specify a medium quality. Word automatically blurs placed images, so any small artifacts in the image will be smeared anyway. At the final size in the document, the photo should never have more than 300 dots per inch, and 200 dots per inch is adequate for most photographs. As an example, your digital camera might take photos 1024 pixels x 768 pixels. This would look fine in Word at a size of 5x3.5. If you only need the photo to been 2.5x 1.75 in Word, scale the photo down to 512x384 pixels before placing it in Word. The file size will only be ¼ what it was with the original shot.
Clip Art and Screenshots Artwork that has areas of flat color is usually best saved as a GIF (.gif) format. Rather than pasting them directly into Word from the clipboard, save them into a picture editor such as PhotoShop or Corel PhotoPaint. Change them from RGB to Indexed Color. Save them with the fewest number of colours possible: This can reduce their file size dramatically. Screenshots on Windows computers are often larger than necessary because they include the window Title Bar with a graduated color. This graduated color will often add hundreds of unneeded colors to your file. To remedy this, right-click on your desktop and choose Properties from the pop-up menu. Select the Appearance tab. On the Item drop-down, choose Active Title Bar. Change Color 2 to the same color as Color 1. OK out and you will find that your screenshots can be half the file size. Depending on your operating system and version of Word, placed GIF files may come in with large dimensions on the page. Use Words Format/Picture command, select the Size tab and set the Scale to 40%.
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Link Graphics, Dont Embed Them Rather than copying and pasting pictures into your document, use Word 97s Insert/Picture/From File command. If you check beside Link to file and then uncheck Save with document, Word will leave the graphic outside the document. You can create a manual with hundreds of illustrations that is only slightly larger than a plain-text version. In Word 2000, Click on the arrow beside the Insert button and choose Link to File to accomplish the same thing.
Word 97 Insert Picture
Word 2000 Insert Picture (Arrow beside Insert button to access Link File option)
The down-side to this procedure is that Word will always expect to find the same graphics in the same folders on your hard disk. If you renamed your graphics folder, Word would no longer display the pictures. You can minimise this difficulty by saving all the graphics into the same folder as the document and linking them from there. Then you can move the document and graphics together to any other folder and Word will still link to them.
Break Up Your File If none of the above strategies work for you, consider breaking your long document into smaller chunks. Often there are natural breaks at chapters or appendices. You will have to adjust your page numbering and automatic Tables of Contents will not work, but this can be the easiest way to work around a monster document.
Stay Away From Master Documents Microsoft advocates using Master Documents and Subdocuments for long documents. Dont consider it. This feature has never worked well in any version of Word. They are easy to mess up, difficult to troubleshoot and prone to corruption.
Consider another Program Word is a word-processor, not a page layout program. If you are doing design-intensive work such as newsletters and manuals, Word is not well suited to the task. The next step up is a program like Microsoft Publisher. Publisher is inexpensive, handles graphics well and does color separations for printing on a press. You should consider a training seminar for the employee who will be doing this work. If you do a lot of these design-intensive documents, its time to bite the bullet and move to a professional page layout package like Adobe Indesign, Adobe PageMaker or Quark XPress. InDesign is capable and is the most modern software, PageMaker is the easiest of these to learn and Quark XPress has the widest support among service bureaux and printers. Training is mandatory for these unless you have someone in-house who is already familiar or has a lot of time to spare. The up-side is that your long-term productivity will be much higher and your headaches minimal.
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