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Bulletin of the European Union. 7/8 1997

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ISSN 0378-3693 European Commission Bulletin of the European Union 7/8 .1997 The Bulletin of the European Union reports on the activities of the Commission and the other Community institutions. It is produced by the Secretariat-General of the European Commission and published 10 times a year in the official European languages. The following reference system is used: the first digit indicates the part number, the second digit the chapter number and the subsequent digit or digits the point number. Citations should there­fore read as follows: Bull. 1/2-1994, point 1.1.1 or 2.2.3. Supplements to the Bulletin are published in a separate series at irregular intervals. They contain official Commission material (e.g. communications to the Council, programmes, reports and proposals). A great deal of additional information on the European Union is available on the Internet. It can be accessed through the Europa server (http://europa.eu.int) European Commission Secretariat-General Editorial team: rue de la Loi /Wetstraat 200 — B-1049 Brussels — Tel.

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ISSN 0378-3693
European Commission
Bulletin
of the European Union
7/8 .1997 The Bulletin of the European Union reports on the activities of the Commission and the other
Community institutions. It is produced by the Secretariat-General of the European Commission
and published 10 times a year in the official European languages.
The following reference system is used: the first digit indicates the part number, the second digit
the chapter number and the subsequent digit or digits the point number. Citations should there­
fore read as follows: Bull. 1/2-1994, point 1.1.1 or 2.2.3.
Supplements to the Bulletin are published in a separate series at irregular intervals. They contain
official Commission material (e.g. communications to the Council, programmes, reports and
proposals).
A great deal of additional information on the European Union is available on the Internet. It
can be accessed through the Europa server (http://europa.eu.int)
European Commission
Secretariat-General
Editorial team: rue de la Loi /Wetstraat 200 — B-1049 Brussels — Tel. 2957930
Sent to press in November 1997
© European Communities, 1997
Reproduction is authorised provided the source is acknowledged
Printed in France European Commission
Bulletin
of the European
Union
7/8 · 1997 Bulletin information service
Readers can obtain information on developments since this issue went to press (date of
adoption of instruments by the Council, of opinions given by Parliament or the
Economic and Social Committee, of publication in the Official Journal, etc.) by tele­
phoning the documentation service of the Commission Offices on the following
numbers:
(171)222 8122 London
Belfast 240 708
Cardiff 371 631
225 2058 Edinburgh
Dublin 671 2244
References in the text
References to other parts of the same issue of the Bulletin are given in parentheses in
text, thus (-> point 2.1.53).
Abbreviations
Publications cited in this Bulletin
Bull. Bulletin of the European Union
Supplement - Bull. Supplement to the Bulletin of the European Union
General Report General Report on the Activities of the European Union
Currencies
ATS Austrian schilling
BEF Belgian franc
DEM German mark
DKK Danish krone
Spanish peseta ESP
FIM Finnish markka
FRF French franc
GBP Pound sterling
GRD Greek drachma
IEP Irish pound
ITL Italian lira
LUF Luxembourg franc
NLG Dutch guilder
PTE Portuguese escudo
SEK Swedish krona
USD United States dollar Contents
ACTIVITIES IN JULY/AUGUST 1997 Part One
News in brief 6
Agenda 2000 7
Union citizenship 10
Human rights1
The Community economic and social area 14
Implementation of the White Paper on growth, competitiveness
and employment and of the initiative 'Action for employment in
Europe: A confidence pact'4
Economic and monetary policy 14
Internal market7
Competition 23
Industrial policy 39
Enterprisey 40
Research and technology1
Education, vocational training and youth 43
Economic and social cohesion5
Energy8
Transport9
Information society, telecommunications 52
Environment 55
Agriculture8
Fisheries 65
Employment and social policy8
Solidarity 70
Equal opportunities0
Public health1
Consumer policy and health protection1
Culture2
Information and communication 73
Role of the Union in the world4
Common foreign and security policy4
International organisations and conferences 81
Common commercial policy3
Development policy 87
Humanitarian aid9
Enlargement 91 Central Europe 95
Mediterranean and Middle East 97
Independent States of the former Soviet Union; Mongolia 102
103 United States, Japan and other industrialised countries
Asia 104
106 Latin America
ACP countries, South Africa and OCTs 107
Diplomatic relations 110
Justice and home affairs cooperation 112
Financing Community activities 114
Sound and efficient financial management (SEM 2000) 114
Budgets 114
Financial operations 121
Measures to combat fraud 121
Statistical system 122
124 Community law
Monitoring the application of Community law 124
126 Decisions by the Court of Justice and the Court of First instance
Community institutions 132
Parliament 132
Council 133
135 Commission
Court of Auditors 135
European Investment Bank 136
Economic and Social Committee 137
Part Two DOCUMENTATION
The ecu 140
Council recommendation of 7 July 1997 on the broad guide­
lines of the economic policies of the Member States and of the
Community 142
Interinstitutional Agreement on the financing of the common
foreign and security policy 148
Twenty-third Western Economic Summit 150
Additional references in the Official Journal 167
Corrigenda 171
Index 172 ¡Τ ON
ACTIVITIES
IN JULY/AUGUST
1997 News in brief
Agenda 2000
□ The Commission adopts the communication 'Agenda 2000 — For a stronger and wider
Union' (­» point 1.1) and, in parallel, 10 opinions on the applications of the countries of central
Europe for membership of the European Union (­* point 1.4.73).
The Community economic and social area
Economic and monetary policy
□ The Council adopts the broad economic policy guidelines for 1997 (­»■ points 1.3.14 and
2.2.1).
Employment and social policy
□ The Commission adopts a White Paper on sectors and activities excluded from the 'working
time' directive (­* point 1.3.218).
□ The Commission adopts a proposal for a Council Directive concerning the framework agree­
ment on part­time work concluded by the social partners (­* point 1.3.221).
Justice and home affairs cooperation
□ The Commission adopts a proposal for a Council joint action introducing a programme of
training, exchanges and cooperation in the field of asylum, immigration and crossing of external
borders (Odysseus) (­+ point 1.5.1).
□ The Commission adopts a proposal for a Council joint action establishing a convention on
rules for the admission of third­country nationals to the Member States of the European Union
(­> point 1.5.2).
Bull. EU 7/8­1997 Agenda 2000
Development of Union policies 1.1. Commission communication entitled
'Agenda 2000: For a stronger and wider Eu­
The EU's policies must be strengthened and rope' .
reformed in the light of the challenges it is fa­
References: cing; demographic constraints, the emergence of
Commission opinion on Cyprus's application new technologies, restructuring, greater interde­
for membership: Bull. 6­1993, point 1.3.6; Sup­ pendence between economies and the need to
plement 5/93­Bull. enhance the EU's international stature.
Conclusions of the Copenhagen European
Council: Bull. 6­1993, point 1.13 The Commission adopted four main objectives s of the Madrid European Council: for internal Community policies: establishing
Bull. 12­1995, point 1.25
the conditions for lasting growth, basing growth Council Decision 94/728/EC, Euratom on the
on knowledge, undertaking the detailed moder­system of the European Communities' own re­
nisation of employment systems and promoting sources: OJ L293, 12.11.1994; Bull. 10­1994,
point 1.5.6; 1996 General Report, point 987 a safe society which is based on solidarity, takes
the general interest into account and respects the New guidelines for the PHARE programme
concerning pre­accession assistance: COM(97) environment.
112; Bull. 3­1997, point 1.4.53
Draft Treaty of Amsterdam: Bull. 6­1997, In order to implement these guidelines, it pro­
point II.4 poses that the relative share of the internal pol­
icies in the Community budget should be
Adopted by the Commission on 15 July. This increased, with the focus on priorities such as
communication, adopted at the same time as the research and development, training and the
opinions on applications for membership pre­ major networks. It also considers it necessary to
sented by the 10 countries of central and eastern rethink its own role and to improve its manage­
Europe (­»■ point 1.4.73), constitutes the reply ment, coordination and supervisory capacities.
from the Commission to the requests made by As announced at the Intergovernmental Confe­
the Madrid European Council in December rence, it will rearrange and redefine its tasks and
1995. In a single framework the Commission reorganise its departments accordingly.
outlines the broad outlook for the development
of the European Union and its policies beyond The Commission sets out three clear priorities
the turn of the century, the impact of enlarge­ for economic and social cohesion: reducing
ment on the Union as a whole and the future regional disparities, supporting regions under­
financial framework beyond 2000. going economic changes and developing human
resources throughout the Union. These must be
The Commission stresses first of all in the intro­ reflected in three corresponding objectives. In
duction that any delay in strengthening the insti­ reducing its seven objectives to three, the Union
tutions would only compromise enlargement of will increase the efficiency and visibility of its
the Union. Under the protocol on the future of structural activities. The Commission also advo­
the institutions attached to the draft Treaty cates the greatest possible geographical concen­
adopted in Amsterdam, a more comprehensive tration: at present over half the population of the
review of the provisions of the Treaties on the Union qualifies for structural aid, and it pro­
composition and functioning of the institutions poses that this proportion should be reduced to
must be carried out before the Union acquires below 40 %. This approach, coupled with the
more than five new Member States. The Com­ decision to maintain overall expenditure on
mission suggests that another Intergovernmental cohesion at 1999 levels in GNP terms will make
Conference should therefore be convened as it possible to meet the real structural aid require­
soon as possible after 2000. ments in the present Union and to take into ac­
Bull. EU 7/8­1997 Agenda 2000
The challenge of enlargement count the new forms of solidarity imposed by
enlargement. Specifically, the allocation for the
Analysis of the effects of enlargement on the
Structural Funds and the Cohesion Fund will be
European Union's policies, particularly on agri­
ECU 230 billion (at constant 1997 prices) for
culture and the Structural Funds, confirms that
the period 2000-06 for the present 15 Member
enlargement may generate considerable political
States and ECU 45 billion for the newr
and economic benefits and advance Community
States, including ECU 7 billion in the form of
policies but at the same time it will make the
pre-accession aid. The increase in transfers to
Union more heterogeneous; this will cause cer­
the applicant countries will take place gradually
tain sectoral and regional adjustment problems,
in order to take their absorption capacity into ac­
and adequate preparations will be needed in
count. Overall transfers from the Structural
order to solve them. The Commission therefore
Funds and Cohesion Fund, should not in any
considers it crucial to make the most of the pre-
event exceed 4 % of a present or future Member
accession period in order to encourage the appli­
State's GDP. The Commission proposes that
cant countries to apply the acquis communau­
countries which form part of the euro zone and
taire upon accession, or after a reasonable tran­
whose per capita GNP is less than 90 % of the
sition period.
Community average should continue to qualify
for the Cohesion Fund, but that there should be a Analysing the situation of the various applicant
mid-term review of eligibility for the Fund. countries against the political and economic cri­
teria laid down by the Copenhagen European
The Commission considers it necessary to con­ Council in 1993, the Commission makes
detailed recommendations on each application tinue the 1992 reform of the common agricultu­
ral policy and to pursue the transition to world and the launch of the negotiating process: it rec­
market prices coupled with direct income aid, ommends that accession negotiations should be
for a variety of reasons: the danger of further opened with Hungary, Poland, Estonia, the
market imbalances, the prospect of a new round Czech Republic and Slovenia, listed in the order
of trade negotiations, the desire for a more envi­ of presentation of their membership applica­
ronment-friendly and quality-oriented agricul­ tions. The European Council decided earlier that
the negotiations on the accession of Cyprus ture and the prospect of enlargement. More spe­
cifically, the Commission plans a substantial would begin six months after the end of the
Intergovernmental Conference, following the drop in institutional prices for cereals and beef
and veal and a smaller reduction for milk subject favourable opinion issued in 1993 by the Com­
to a quota system. These reductions will be off­ mission. On the basis of its analysis and the
set by an increase in income premiums. The merits of each case, the Commission considers
consumer will therefore benefit directly from the that these countries could meet all the conditions
new approach. To avoid overcompensating for for membership, in the medium term, if they
losses of earnings resulting from the drop in continue and considerably intensify their prepar­
atory efforts. The Commission stresses that the prices, the Commission plans compensation of
less than 100 %, on the grounds that market decision to launch accession negotiations with
all these countries at once does not necessarily prices are expected to remain higher than institu­
tional support prices. It also suggests that a spe­ mean the negotiations will be concluded at the
cific ceiling be set per farm for all direct income same time; the timing will depend largely on
aid financed by the Community. how the countries pursue the efforts demanded
of them in the opinions on their applications.
The Commission also considers that the least Since the need for a fully-fledged rural devel­
prepared countries should look firmly ahead to opment policy is becoming increasingly evident,
future negotiations and proposes that a part­the Commission intends to adapt the existing
nership for accession be established with each of rural policy instruments by placing the emphasis
on structural flanking measures financed by the the applicant countries. This partnership would
have three components: progressive adoption of EAGGF Guarantee Section, increasing the bud­
the acquis communautaire, familiarisation with get resources allocated to agri-environmental
Community programmes and working methods measures and authorising the Member States to
and lastly, from 2000, financial pre-accession make direct payments conditional on compli­
aid. To that end, the Commission proposes large ance with environmental rules.
8 Bull. EU 7/8-1997