LOOKING BEYOND THE HORIZON Natalia Nevezhkina Far Eastern ...
110 Pages
English
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LOOKING BEYOND THE HORIZON Natalia Nevezhkina Far Eastern ...

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110 Pages
English

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Office of Academic Policies, Procedures and Documentation. 35-38. Center for Research and ..... Sharing between the department, College, VPR, and. Provost.

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LOOKING BEYOND THE HORIZON I may not have gone where I intended to go, But I think I have ended up where I need to be. Douglas Adams Natalia Nevezhkina Far Eastern State University, Vladivostok, Russia This study was made possible through invaluable support of Carnegie Corporation of New York, IREX (International Research & Exchanges Board), Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis, and all the people who work hard to bring excellence to faculty development program in the multicultural terrain. 1 This case study is the result of my experience working at the Office for Professional Development at Indiana University Purdue University, Indianapolis (IUPUI). Over the course of two months, I work with IUPUI faculty and staff to investigate American higher education practices to improve faculty teaching and student learning strategies. I wish to express my particular gratitude to all the people who have participated in hosting me. The enthusiasm and dedication they devote to their own work has always been contagious. My deepest appreciation goes to Sharon Hamilton as well as to Nancy Chism, Elizabeth Rubens, Jackie Singh, Mary Price, Lauren Chism, Terri Tarr, Nelson Soto and to all staff members of Office for Professional Development for their continued support. 2 CONTENTS page Introduction 6 Section 1 7-9 Forces Driving Educational change in Global Community 7-8 Divergent Views about the Purposes of College 9 Section 2 10-25 Case study premises and methods 10 Brief History of the University 10-11 IUPUI Mission Statement 11 Goals for Implementing IUPUI Mission Statement 11-21 Comparison of Federal and state Goal 22-23 Comparison of State, IUPUI and OPD Collective Goals 24-25 Section 3 26-31 Office for Professional Development 26 OPD Organizational Chart 2000 27 OPD Organizational Chart 2004-2005 28 OPD Organizational Chart November, 2006 29 OPD Infrastructure Revision 30 OPD Mission 30 IUPUI Goals-IUPUI Collective Goals 31 Section 4 32-66 OPD IUPUI Today 32-33 OPD Advisory Committee 33 Associate Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs- Dr. Hamilton 33 Administrative Unit of OPD IUPUI 33-35 Office of Academic Policies, Procedures and Documentation 35-38 Center for Research and Development 38-48 Scholarly and Creative Activity Program 38-42 Associate Faculty Office 42-43 Office for Multicultural Professional development 43-45 Office for Women 45-47 Organizational development 47-48 Center on Integrated Learning 48-52 Principles of Undergraduate Learning 48 Center for Research and Learning 52-53 3 Center for Teaching and Learning 53-62 Instructional Design and Development 60-61 Instructional Technology 61 Information Resources Unit 61-62 Center for Service and Learning 62-66 Section 5 66-68 OPD Support by Unit 2005-2006 67 OPD Funding Inclusive of Support by Other Units 2006-2007 68 Implications and Conclusions 69-82 Appendix 1 83 Appendix 2 83-88 Appendix 3 88-110 4 ABBREVIATIONS 1. OPD - Office for Professional Development 2. IUPUI- Indiana University Purdue University, Indianapolis 3. FESU- Far Eastern State University, Vladivostok 4. POD – Professional and Development Network in Higher Education 5. TESOL 6. GPPA- Guaranteed Professional Program Admission 7. AVC- Associate Vice Chancellor 8. APPD- Office of Academic Policies, Procedures and Documentation 9. ePort- electronic Portfolio 10. AFO- Associate Faculty Office 11. FACET- The Indiana University Faculty Colloquium on Excellence in Teaching 12. COIL- Center on Integrated Learning 13. PULs – Principles of Undergraduate Learning 14. TLCs- Themed Learning Communities 15. SoTL- Scholarship of Teaching and Learning 16. IU- Indiana University 17. IUB- Indiana University, Bloomington 18. CoP – Communities of Practice 19. CRL- Center for Research and Learning 20. UROP- Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program 21. SROP- Summer Research Opportunities 22. IUURC- Indiana University Undergraduate Research Conference 23. CSL- Center for service and Learning 24. COPC- Community Outreach Partnership Center 25. CTL- Center for Teaching and Learning 26. IDD- Instructional Design and Development 27. IT- Instructional technology 28. IR- Information resources 29.NINFD- New Faculty Developers 30. CLN- Community Learning Network 31. COS- Community of Science 32. SCAP- Scholarly and Creative Activity Program 33. LEC- Learning Environment Committee 34. AOD- Advocacy administrative Development 35. OMPD- Office for Multicultural Professional Development 36. DRF- Diverse Researchers Forum 37. OW- Office for Women 38. PFF- Preparing Future Faculty Program 5 INTRODUCTION From the earliest days, the United States of America have valued education. Today the tradition continues. There are more than 600 public and 1,700 private, four-year colleges and universities, as well as “proprietary schools”. Education is primarily a state and local responsibility. However, the federal government plays an important role in affecting education policy. U.S. Congress, U.S. Department of Education are enacting the traditions of Founding Fathers to create the finest system for teaching and learning by means of legislature acts and programs that guideline the major issues within the system.. One of the major activities of the U.S. Department of Education is to help identify approaches, ideas and successful teaching techniques. Colleges and universities are knowledge-driven institutions, but with a history and culture unlike other organizations. Faculty drives university teaching, research, and service with a level of self-direction and independence foreign to employees in most other organizational settings. An important challenge for the institution is the need to balance that faculty self-direction and independence with the institution’s mission, vision and strategies. So, how and why were the new vistas within the educational system of the U.S. discovered or what triggered the development of a huge network of educators working on promoting excellence and efficiency in higher education? What are the results and practical impact on the excellence and efficiency of teaching and learning? This topic is highly important for the Russian system of Higher education, though the systems are different. Today the Far Eastern Sate University thrives for excellence and efficiency, and determines as the Mission statement key aims the following issues: • Vision of human civilization development perspectives, advancement ahead of today in the University's activities; • Ensuring quality of education corresponding to the highest international standards; • Permanent development of fundamental and applied sciences as a vital prerequisite of quality education; • Internationalization of education, research, and culture, integration into the worldwide educational, research, and cultural environment; • Constant development and implementation of advanced information technologies into education, research, and various areas of world community's activities; • Protection and development of moral and cultural values of human society; • Forming moral, highly intellectual and physically healthy individuals with honor, abilities 1and will to lead, win and promote prosperity of humankind. Thus, having the hallmark opportunity to provide my home university with an experience of the best expertise I am going to investigate the strategic goals and their realization within the framework of my observations while being hosted by OPD IUPUI Fall 2006. 1 www.dvgu.ru 6 Section 1. 2Forces Driving Educational Change in Global Community Premise: Educational institutions do not exist in a vacuum. They are influenced by societal events constantly occurring around them. These varying societal events are forcing educational institutions to change. Demographics: Older students are attending at much higher rates Academic delivery for older students must accommodate their outside obligations Students are working part-time while enrolled in full-time programs Higher proportion of high school graduates Students lacking recommended college preparatory curricula Greater percentage of non-traditional students More cultural diversity with higher minority participation Economic Pressures: Enrollment and operating costs increase while funding decreases When tuition is too high, students will seek less expensive alternatives Development in the Workplace: Employers seeking technology and information literate employees Workers are required to be knowledgeable about information access, problem solving, analysis, evaluation, team work, adaptability, and decision-making Rapid change and uncertainty cause employers to seek workers already equipped with the necessary skills Learners need frequent short-term updating as required skills change More part-time workers require more flexible access to education The growth of knowledge is inhibiting individuals’ ability to remain current, with an emphasis on the ability to access, rather than memorize, information Need for high-level intellectual skills Competition: Private business’ practice of offering short, inexpensive market-specific training directly competes with traditional college programs Internet access is responsible for the global competition among educational providers New Enrollment Patterns: Increased part-time enrollment Multiple attendances Online and distance courses 2 J.Singh, Ph.D, OPD, IUPUI 7 The Information Explosion: Huge and rapidly increasing quantity of information available Loose review and control of information quality The Technological Revolution: New types of jobs for graduates Changed nature of classroom due to online learning A Stricter Regulatory Environment: Greater duty of accountability More intrusive state of regulation on the curriculum Accreditation emphasis on effectiveness and assessment New Educational Sites and Formats: Rapid growth of the for-profit higher education sector, with little regulation and accreditation Rise of the corporate university More flexible learning formats Major Global Problems Requiring Enhanced International Cooperation: Demand for technologically and quantitatively literate employees Interaction with diverse people Renewed Emphasis on Civic Responsibility and Communal Values: Rise in student volunteerism Cyclical student activism Increased pressure on colleges and university to join the community in resolving local problems Thus, it may be clearly seen from the chart that purpose of College in USA varies, depending on the consumer of education as service. 8 3Divergent Views About the Purposes of College Source: 2002 National Panel Report: Greater Expectations: A New Vision for Learning as a Nation Goes to College Students Employers Policymakers Faculty Public Would like to see Recognizes differences in higher education supply Engage students Focus on specific abilities prestige among colleges and Ticket to a good job adequate workforce intellectually and needed for employees expects quality and empowering needs while attracting seriously education from them all local business Expect colleges to graduate students able to perform consistently well, Look for economic Expect courses will well Believe deep learning Students are expected to be better communicate effectively, growth and prepare them to enter or develops the about to at thinking and at knowledge- think analytically, help improvements in change to chosen careers, defend positions based based work than after high solve problems, work statewide standards of and then advance on knowledge school collegially in divers teams living and use relevant skills of the profession Expect students to write Higher education well, think clearly, disengaged for instilling Attendance will pay off in a Expect technological and explore multiple fields skills for information more successful career, family information literacy of inquiry, and gain a and technology literate life, and place in society substantive knowledge graduates. in a field Although some look for college College learning should graduates to assume leadership result in rational and roles in the community, public Looks for quantitative reflective minds, open attention focuses primarily on reasoning to continuous learning "getting in" to college, paying throughout a lifetime. the bills, and then "getting out" with a degree. Expect its members, Wish that postsecondary both professors and degrees, like technical students, to support free Knows comparatively little about certification, ensured discussion that respects what actually happens during the documented levels of a variety of viewpoints, college years accomplishment and to embrace the active life of the mind 3 J.Singh, Ph.D, OPD IUPUI 9 Section 2. My research of the Faculty Development program is based on data collected from the Office for Professional Development at Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis – stOPD IUPUI (Fall 2006); participation in the 31 Annual Conference of the Professional and Organizational Development (POD) Network in Higher Education October 25-29 Portland, Oregon; visits to Purdue University and Indiana University - Bloomington, participation in the thIndiana TESOL Conference Nov. 10 , 2006. The methods that were used to obtain relevant data are based on multiple sources of evidence: meetings, interviews, consultations, and talks, research of theoretical issues, library work and participation in workshops, sessions, conferences, roundtables, and work with the university archives. BRIEF HISTORY OF THE UNIVERSITY Indiana University grew from the State Seminary, which was established by an act of the General Assembly in 1820. The Bloomington campus is the oldest and largest in the university, and is also the primary residential campus. There are now seven other campuses. All except for Indiana University Northwest (IUN) in Gary offer both IU and Purdue degree programs: Indiana University East (IUE) in Richmond, Indiana University Kokomo (IUK), Indiana University South Bend (IUSB), Indiana University Southeast (IUS) in New Albany, Indiana University Purdue University Fort Wayne (IPFW), and Indiana University–Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI). IUPUI is a comprehensive metropolitan campus and home base to most of the University’s professional schools in health sciences. IU administers the IUPUI campus as well as its satellite IUPU–Columbus, while Purdue administers IPFW. Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis is an urban research and academic health sciences campus, with 22 schools and academic units which grant degrees in over 200 programs from both Indiana University and Purdue University. IUPUI was created in 1969 as a partnership by and between Indiana and Purdue Universities, with IU as the managing partner. With over 29,000 students, IUPUI is the second- largest campus in the Indiana University state wide system. The IUPUI campus ranks among the top 15 in the country in the number of first professional degrees it confers and among the top seven in the number of health-related degrees. 4As it is said “Two world-renowned universities. One dynamic campus” All except for Indiana University Northwest (IUN) in Gary offer both IU and Purdue Over 29,000 students attend IUPUI representing 49 states and 122 countries IUPUI alumni account for 85% of Indiana's dentists, half of the physicians, nearly half of the state's lawyers, more than a third of the nurses, and a large percentage of the health and rehabilitation sciences and social work professionals. 4 www.iupui.edu 10