NEWSLETTER - University of Pittsburgh Department of Infectious ...
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NEWSLETTER - University of Pittsburgh Department of Infectious ...

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Learn all about the services we offer
34 Pages
English

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Infectious Diseases (http://www.idm.pitt.edu/degrees.asp#CBI). ... Biological and Biomedical Sciences at Emory University, where she is now working as a Postdoc in the ... Virginia, West Virginia, and Washington, D.C. ..... Montelaro RC, Ayyavoo V. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Vpr: oligomerization is an essential ...

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NEWSLETTER December 2010 Department of Infectious Diseases and Microbiology Graduate School of Public Health University of Pittsburgh PIONEERING GSPH GRADUATE HONORED WITH DEAN’S AWARD By C. Rinaldo On the wall outside of the Department of IDM’s main office hangs a set of plaques listing the names of all graduates of the department’s microbiology programs. The names are in chronological order beginning with the first graduate, Lourdes Espiritu Campos, MD, MPH, in 1951. Lourdes Campos with IDM chairman Charles Rinaldo  Cover Story p. 1-3 th IDM 13 Annual Meeting p. 5  Report from the Chairman p. 9  Alumni News p. 10  Baby News p 13  Spotlight News p. 14  Conference Photos p. 16  And the Award Goes to p. 21  Recent IDM Graduates p. 22  Big News p. 25  Newly Appointed p. 26  National & International Oral & Poster Presentations p. 27  Recently Published Articles from IDM p. 30 PIONEERING GSPH GRADUATE continued Over 10 years ago when I honored our graduates by creating this display, I was interested in knowing more about this first graduate with the non-Anglo name. The power of the internet led me to discover that Dr. Campos was a Philippine native with a long and illustrious professional career. Dr. Campos received her MD degree from the University of the Philippines in 1945. In my visit with her in May, she related the difficulties and hardships of studying in Japanese-occupied Manila during World War II. Some of the worst times were during the liberation by American armed forces and withdrawal of the Japanese. She recalled how a fellow student was mistakenly killed by American soldiers when crossing the bombed-out campus. A positive outcome of the war was that Dr. Campos was able to be trained in bacteriology by the US Army, setting the stage for her life-long career in this field. In 1948 she was appointed an Instructor in the Institute of Public Health, University of the Philippines. Seeking more training in her new specialty, she was awarded an international fellowship in public health and in 1949 was accepted into the Department of Epidemiology and Microbiology of the newly established University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health. Dr. Campos was one of 29 students admitted to the MPH program in 1950. Dr. Campos was the first Pitt graduate student of Dr. W. M. Hammon, a renowned microbiologist and the first chairman of the department. She has many wonderful photographs of her time in Pittsburgh, including one of the first graduating class in 1951. One of the most vivid memories of her time in Pittsburgh was spending the Christmas holidays in her rooming house, with the cold, snowy winter blustering outside her windows. This was quite a shocking difference from her tropical Philippines. Dr. Campos then returned to the Philippines to wed Dr. Paulo C. Campos. He later became well noted for his pioneering work on nuclear medicine. He is credited with establishing the first and best known Radioisotope Laboratory in the Philippines, the first Research Laboratory in the Department of Medicine, University of the Philippines and the Thyroid Clinic of the University of the Philippines-Philippine General Hospital Medical Center. From the early 1950s through the 1960s, Dr. Lourdes Campos rose through the professional ranks, leading to becoming the Chair of the Department of Medical Microbiology in the Institute of Public Health, University of the Philippines, in 1969. In 1979, after many years of planning and deliberations, the Emilio Aguinaldo College of Medicine with founded with campuses in Manila and Cavite, and Dr. Lourdes Campos as Dean. Since her retirement, she has served on the Board of Trustees of the college. Her family maintains a strong leadership role in the college. Her sons Jose Paulo E. Campos, Paulo E. Campos and Enrique E. Campos are currently president, treasurer and trustee of the college, respectively (the whole family is pictured on the right). Earlier this year, Dr. Campos was honored with the GSPH Dean’s Lifetime Achievement Award. During a visit the Philippines for a scientific meeting on AIDS, I met with Dr. Campos and members of her family. She hosted me and Drs. Beej Macatangay and Peter Veldkamp from the Pitt School of Medicine in her home for a very pleasant and sumptuous lunch. Dr. Campos discussed her medical education in occupied Manila during World War II, and her experiences at GSPH in 1950 and ’51. She showed us with great pride her album of wonderful pictures and news clippings of the first GSPH graduating class, with Dean Parran, Dr. Hammon and other luminaries. Before leaving her home we presented Dr. Campos with the GSPH award shown in the picture. In another accompanying picture you can see Peter, Beej and I wearing our new gifts from Dr. Campos, with the beautiful Taal volcano and lake in the background. Dr. Lourdes was the first leader to emerge from our graduate microbiology program. We are very fortunate that she had the foresight and tenacity to venture forth years ago and lead the way in our 60 year history of achievement. REFLECTIONS ON MY YEAR AS A STUDENT IN THE GRADUATE SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH, UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH By Lourdes Espiritu Campos, MD, MPH In 1950 I was awarded a scholarship by the United States Public Health Service to study in a newly opened School of Public Health in the University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, U.S.A. I was one of 29 students admitted to the Master of Public Health Program. Before I left for Pittsburgh, I was an instructor in microbiology teaching mainly virology to graduate and undergraduate students in the School of Public Health, University of the Philippines. The first batch of students in the new school consisted mostly of M.D.’s from Mexico, Peru, Sweden, Germany, Norway, U.S.A., and two from the Philippines. Our classes were held in the Municipal Hospital building which was near the University of Pittsburgh football stadium. Soon after classes opened, we were taken by some staff members of the school on a sightseeing tour of the city. I noticed that many buildings looked blackened with soot. At night we saw slag discarded from steel mills glaring in the dark. When the football season began we were brought to watch the game of which I knew nothing about. We were provided with blankets but I nearly froze sitting on the bench, watching the game going on. It was quite an experience for one coming from the tropics. The Dean of the school was Dr. Thomas Parran. Since I was an instructor in microbiology teaching mainly virology, my major area of concentration was in the Department of Microbiology and Epidemiology under Dr. William McDowell Hammon, chair of the department. Miss Gladys Sather was my teacher mostly in laboratory procedures. Dr. Francis Cheever was also one of our principal lecturers. The staff in the department was very friendly and helpful. I learned a lot from them. I remember the first snowfall that I had ever seen. Dr. Hammon was lecturing and I believe he noticed that I was looking out of the window most of the time instead of paying attention to what he was saying. It is hard to forget my first fall on the icy pavement which was quite embarrassing. So I learned to wear galoshes to prevent a repetition of such an experience. There was a big snowstorm that swept thru the Eastern seaboard that year. It occurred during the Thanksgiving holiday when I was visiting my uncle and his family in Franklinville, New York. There was a big, delicious roast turkey to celebrate the day. When I returned to Pittsburgh the snow was up to my knees - fortunately I had boots on and was well bundled. I had to walk from the train station lugging my suitcase over the snow. When I reached the Alpha Omega sorority house in North Bellefield Street where I was living, it was empty of residents. Fortunately I had a key to the house and some food given by my uncle. It was so cold and dark in the house and my feet were numb. The doorbell rang several times but I was afraid to open the door. After two days my housemates and our house mother finally returned and classes resumed. Christmas was a difficult time to be away from home but my uncle invited me again to spend the holidays with them. It was a happy reunion with his family and I was less homesick. The school year went so fast. On June 13, 1951, twelve of us students graduated with a Master in Public Health Degree. I am so proud to be among its first graduates. I was sad to leave the school. By that time I had many friends and it was difficult to say goodbye. The walls of the Cathedral of Learning and the Catholic Cathedral as well as other buildings were much cleaner than when I first saw them. My professors and the staff in the department gave me a little send-off party with a beautiful farewell card which I keep to this day. After I returned to Manila I went back to the Department of Microbiology, Institute of Public Health, University of the Philippines. The added knowledge I acquired during my study in GSPH served me well. Our virus laboratory became more active and functional in spite of limited funds. Many requests for diagnostic tests for suspected viral diseases from The Philippine General Hospital, the biggest government hospital in the Philippines, and other hospitals from Manila and the provinces were brought to our laboratory. Many of our government antigens and antisera were imported from the USA but we were able to produce a number of our needed antisera as our funds because available and our facilities improved. During my time the diagnostic procedures consisted mainly of trying to isolate the causative agent using a living medium such as laboratory animals, embryonated eggs and tissue cultures and indication of past or existing infections by serological means. I learned many of these procedures during my stay in GSPH. Research work became possible as we received government and foreign grants. The researches were on the isolation and identification of viruses from respiratory tract infections mainly influenza, enterovirus, arboviruses and others. Dr. Hammon and his team came to Manila to study a newly observed epidemic with hemorrhagic manifestations in children which causative agent was later identified as dengue virus. Besides diagnostic and research work in virology, I was also assigned to teach the virology part of microbiology to all students required to take the subject as part of their course. This included students of our Institute enrolled in the Graduate of Public Health Program, Hospital Administration, as well as undergraduate students of other units of the university. Faculty members in our department had a heavy teaching load. Later on when the faculty member teaching immunology left for study abroad, I was asked to teach that subject. This gave me the reason and opportunity to go to Copenhagen to attend a course for Teachers of Immunology. At present after so many years of doing research in virology and teaching in government and private institutions, I am retired but not idle. I have not been back to Pittsburgh since I left in 1951. I hear from some of my friends that it is now a beautiful, clean city and that the Graduate School had acquired a building of its own. I continue to receive publications such as the Newsletter, Report from the Chairman and Public health which keeps me updated on the many outstanding researches that are produced in that department under the leadership of Dr. Charles Rinaldo. thIDM 13 ANNUAL MEETING “An IDM Tradition” As Tevya famously said in “Fiddler of the Roof” the people are kept together by “Tradition”. And so too it is in IDM. Many traditions in the Department remind faculty, staff and student of our heritage and evolution over the years. One of the traditions for more than a decade is the Fall Annual Meeting. First convened in 1998 as the IDM Retreat, the event has successfully evolved into its present format becoming part of the Department’s tradition. In 2001, the current edition of the two day event began with the annual poster presentation and competition on tha Thursday afternoon in the Fall semester (September 16 this year) in the Students Common room of GSPH. This year 27 posters were entered into competition, 7 from MS students, 15 from PhD students, and 1 from a DrPH student. Judges Salvador Tarun, Ernesto Marques and Charlene Dezzutti reviewed poster abstracts and then spent several hours meeting with the authors of the posters. After the formal review of the posters, colleagues throughout the Department socialized over wine and cheese and informally discussed the posters with the students. Drs. Phalguni Gupta, Ernesto Marques, Charles Rinaldo and Yue Chen Kellie Smith, Ron Fecek, Emilee Knowlton and Lauren Lepone Joe Pawak and Dr. Larry Kingsley The second part of the Annual Meeting is held the following day. It has always resembled the earliest retreats in that it is located in the country, away from the environment of classroom and lab. The tradition for the past 11 years has made that location the Rose Barn or Lodge at North Park. Unfortunately this year a cool and overcast morning evolved into a cool and overcast afternoon. But never mind - part of the rustic tradition of the rural setting is roughing-it. This year roughing-it meant getting chairs at the last minute when the originally ordered failed to materialize, and shifting the venue partly from the …and the Volleyball Tournament begins…. upper to lower floor of the Rose Barn. Another tradition is the departmental volunteers who put in extra effort to make the event a success. Whether it is organizing the meeting, securing the venues, ordering the food, setting-up the AV equipment, assembling the games, or serving on the clean-up detail, a small cadre of volunteers continues to contribute to the success of the event. Following breakfast, Dr. Rinaldo began the annual meeting with a more in-depth than usual state-of-the- Department report. Titled “IDM in Year 2010 and Beyond”, he first reiterated the department’s mission and basic programs to achieve this. He then briefly updated and cataloged our current faculty members and their expertise. Audience interest intensified when he reviewed the departmental budget, showing a plateau but steady level of extramural funding over the past few years. He next emphasized the healthy increase in our graduate student enrollment over the same time period. Dr. Rinaldo rounded off his presentation by looking ahead to the exciting plans for the new GSPH laboratory building and renovation of Parran and Crabtree Halls. He ended with a rousing “Thanks to all for a great year - onward to a fantastic future!” Following Dr. Rinaldo’s report, each member of the Department’s primary faculty gave a brief presentation on their research. Aimed primarily at new students, the sessions also provide an opportunity for all members of the Department to get an update of current research developments. After a refreshing lunch, 9 teams took up the court for the IDM volleyball tournament. Every game was a hard-fought struggle but one-by-one, teams were eliminated. In the championship game the PMS-PPP emerged victorious and claimed first prize, continuing their tradition of winning Annual Meeting competitions. Congratulations to the winners and to all the contestants for supplying the entertainment. 2010 Volleyball Champions – “PMS/PPP” Standing: Scott Arrowood, Alyssa Abebe, Carol Perfetti, Nathaniel Soltesz, Greg Fisher, Jeffrey Toth, Rodger Beatty, Dave Stefanac, Nayck Feliz Kneeling: Kristen D’Acunto, Soni Sankapal, Tony Silvestre, Bridget Calhoun Mary Pavlovich, Shulin Qin, Beth Junecko, Todd Reinhart, Cynthia Klamar, Chris Bowen, Carrisa Lucero, Stella Berendam, Yang Kyu Choi Kim Griffin, Brandon Deshmukh, Emerson Evans, Adrienne Long, Greg Joseph, Sagar Nadgir , Zach Swan Nitin Bhardwaj, Jeremy Martinson, Blair Gleeson, Matthew Nicholaou, Sara Chadwick, Jess Malzahn One of the highlights of the Annual Meeting was the announcement of the names of the poster competition prize winners. After due consideration, the following posters were judged best: st1 Place – Sreya Tarafdar, “Towards the Mechanism of Inhibition of Nef-Mediated HCK Activation by Suramin” Advisor: Tom Smithgall nd2 Place – Puru Narute, “Inhibitors of NEF-Induced SRC-Family Kinase Activation are Active Against HIV-1 Replication Supported by Nef Alleles from All Major HIV-1 Clades” Advisor: Tom Smithgall rd3 Place – Nitin Bhardwaj, “Evaluation of Immune Response and Protective Efficacy of DNA and Replicon Based Vaccines Against Aerosolized Rift Valley Fever Virus Infection in Mice” Advisor: Ted Ross, PhD Nabanita Biswas, “Adenosine Deaminase Acting on RNA 1 (ADAR1) is a Novel Anti-HIV-1 Cellular Factor” Advisor: Phalguni Gupta, PhD Matthew Nicholaou, “PCSK9 and COX2 Determine Low Density Lipoprotein Levels in HIV Positive Men Receiving Highly Active Retroviral Therapy” Advisor: Jeremy Martinson, PhD Dear IDM Alumni and Friends: Updatte on the reenovations of the Gradduate Schoool of Public Health: CC onstructio nn of fou r ‐story, ne w research b uilding (se e picture in the s p ring, 2010 IDM Newslett e r )) will b e gin with d e molition o f t he ex i s ti n gg aud i toriu m in th e sp r ing of 201 1 . A new staudit o rium with a different s ize and co n figura tion w ill be con s tructed on the 1 fl oo rr n dof the new buildi n g. IDM lab o ratories w i ll occupy t h e whole 2 floor and a port ion o ff r dthe 3 floor of th e new build i ng. Huma n Genetics a n d Ep idemi i ology labo r atories wil ll thoccup yy the 4 flo oo r. Floors 2 ,, 3 and 4 wi i ll have 3 p aa rallel rows of laborat oories and suppo r t facilities runni ng pe r pendicula r to Fifth A v enue. The l a boratorie s will be a mix of “open” a n d “closed” lab config u rations. T h e re will be w alkways on each floo r connectin n g Parran Hall and the ne w lab build i ng. Th e re w ill be glas s ‐front, soci i al “break” a reas o n th e end of eac h stlab oratory floo r facing Fift h Avenu e. T he 1 fl oor entryway f ac ing Fifth Avenue wil ll retain i ts lofty ceilin g , and be wood‐p a neled and g lass‐fro n t e d. C omple t ion is expe cted by earl ly 2013. The second p h a se of the G S PH renova t ions will b e an upd a ti n g of Parra n and Crab t ree Halls t h at will foll ow complet i on of the n e w lab orat o ry buildin g . An additi o nal $1 5 mi llion is nee d ed to u pgr a de the basi c utilities, r emove the l aborat orie s , and mod erniz e thes e 45‐to ‐50 y ear ol d faci lities. In or d er t o achi eve this en d , the GS PH is plannin g a major fu n d drive. W e will be as king facult y members a nd alumni of I DDM to work together i n addressin gg this c r itic aa lly import aa nt end eav oor. Graduate student enrollment continues to grow: This fal l we had 23 new l y m atriculatin g students, compared t o only six n ew stu d e n ts 10 ye a rs a go. Thi s is largely d ue to incr eas ing o u r M PH and MS studen t e n r ollme n t . We al so c o ntinue to h ave a v e ry high gra dd uation rat ee . From 199 9 throu g h 22 003, w e gr aa duated 20 stu d ents, co mp a red to 90 s tudents gr a duated fro m 2004 thr ough 201 0 . Indeed, a measure o f our succe s s is that w e rec ently h a d to add two plaqu e s to place o ur graduat i ng studen t s ’ names on n our “Al u mni Wall” ( see picture ). What is unique about IDM: A rec ent survey o f o ur student s i n di c a te s t hat th e mo st attrac tiv e f a c t o r in cho osing IDM f o r their gra d ua te studi e s was o u r s trong p u b lic health‐r e lated emp hasis in infe ctious dise as es. We a r e now one of only sev e n depa rtm ents sp e cia llizi ng i n i n f ect i ous di s e ases o f th e 46 acc r edi t ed sch o ols of publ i c health. T h e others a r e Har var d, Johns Hop k ins, Tula n e , UC Berkel e y, U South Flor ida and Yal e (U. Washi ngton sc ho o l of public health tran sferred the i r infectio u s disease g r aduate pro gg ram to an oo ther sch oo ll several ye aa rs ago). I r ee call being tt aken abac kk a few yea rr s ago by a vv isit ing epi d emiolo gist who asked me rather b luntly, “W h y do you e x ist?” I pau s ed, smiled and a n s we r ed “Be cause it wo r ks.” Follow the money: The t o tal extr am u ral researc h funding i n IDM in 20 09‐2010 w a s approxi mately $16 mill i on, of whic h $3 m illio n was for in direct cost s (overhead )). Our total researc h f unding h a s r emai ned wel ll above $13 million sin cc e 2003. WW e hope to mm ainta in t h i ss strong res s ea rch fund ii ng base a s ww e na viga t ee thr ough the Gr e at Rec essi o n. Alu mni and for m er staff a n d faculty m embers – p lease keep in touch! Wit h kind rega r ds, Congratulations to IDM MPH Graduate Anne Nagy IDM is delighted to announce that Annie Nagy has been awarded an Albert Schweitzer Lambaréné Fellowship for 2010 (http://schweitzerfellowship.org/ ). Only six of these prestigious fellowships were awarded this year, and Annie is the first Lambaréné Fellow ever to be selected from the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health. Annie will be working at the Schweitzer Hospital in Lambaréné, Gabon, Africa. Founded in 1913 by Nobel Peace Laureate Dr. Albert Schweitzer, Schweitzer Hospital has served as the surrounding region's primary source of health care for nearly 100 years; today, it provides skilled care through over 35,000 outpatient visits and more than 6,000 hospitalizations annually for patients from all parts of Gabon. Annie joins the more than 100 senior medical and public health students who have been competitively selected as Lambaréné Schweitzer Fellows (http://schweitzerfellowship.org/features/lamb/fellows.aspx) since 1979 - each traveling to the iconic Schweitzer Hospital in Lambaréné; spending three months conducting village-based community health outreach; and returning to the U.S. as a Schweitzer Fellow for Life (http://schweitzerfellowship.org/features/fellows/) committed to working with vulnerable populations throughout his or her professional career. Annie graduated from our program this year with an MPH in Community and Behavioral Intervention in Infectious Diseases (http://www.idm.pitt.edu/degrees.asp#CBI). Her master's thesis was on the "Socio- Demographic Factors Associated with Condom Use in the Cameroon Military". She is also completing her doctoral dissertation work in the University of Pittsburgh Department of Anthropology. Annie was named the 2010 Outstanding Master's student for the Department of Infectious Diseases and Microbiology. During her time as a Lambaréné Public Heath Schweitzer Fellow, Annie will be working with an international staff of the hospital's Gabonese and expatriate professionals, supporting the Hospital's Community Health Outreach Program in providing village-based health care. Specifically, she will be working with local doctors and community health workers to launch a tuberculosis (TB) program at Lambaréné. There is currently no program in place so most individuals that arrive at the hospital are in the late stages of TB. They only remain at the hospital for 2 weeks for treatment before they are sent home to continue their own treatment. The internationally recommended strategy for treating TB, Directly Observed Treatment Short course therapy (DOTS), does not work well in rural areas of Africa for a plethora of reasons, so Annie will be working on training community health workers on implementing a revised version of DOTS in their villages. She will also be training them on how to identify TB patients and send them for testing at the Schweitzer hospital. The program will be launched in June of this year and the goal is to identify and treat all TB patients in the Lambaréné area by December 2011. The Schweitzer Fellowship will enable Annie to combine her anthropological expertise with the knowledge and skills she acquired in our MPH in Community and Behavioral Intervention in Infectious Diseases (http://www.idm.pitt.edu/degrees.asp#CBI). Annie will have an opportunity to make a valuable contribution to the patients of the Schweitzer Hospital, and will return ready to expand and continue her career in Public Health.