CLERMONT Paul - SYLLABUS P2 - Plan de cours Proposition of seminars -  p2
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English

CLERMONT Paul - SYLLABUS P2 - Plan de cours Proposition of seminars - p2

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Seminars proposal to University Jean Moulin Lyon3 (By Professor Paul Clermont) PERIOD 2 The new commercialization challenges: a North American view This seminar will present to the European participants the view of the new challenges in commercialization as perceived and lived in the North American market. It will explain the revolution lived in North America in the distribution and retail industries, the implications that it had on the manufacturing and agriculture sectors, and its implications on the perceptions of the business decision makers of the opportunities and threats that exist and will appear on the international markets. (Some private testimonies of retailers will be presented on videos) The learning process will be done by a specific succession of presentation by the professor on a specific topic followed by a discussion with the group to bring their own experiences and perceptions as to ensure a personal synthesis and positioning on the presented topic. The presentation by the professor will be focused on actual market realities and on a practical approach to the different strategies and tactics to bring a product or services to the North American market. Some examples and case study will also bring some “cross-cultural” reference to other way of marketing and commercializing product in other world markets. Some open discussions will also be done on a few actual problems referring to lager issues involving commercialization. These ...

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Seminars proposal to University Jean Moulin Lyon3
(By Professor Paul Clermont)
PERIOD 2 The new commercialization challenges:a North American view
This seminar will present to the European participants the view of the new challenges in commercialization as perceived and lived in the North American market. It will explain the revolution lived in North America in the distribution and retail industries, the implications that it had on the manufacturing and agriculture sectors, and its implications on the perceptions of the business decision makers of the opportunities and threats that exist and will appear on the international markets. (Some private testimonies of retailers will be presented on videos)
The learning process will be done by a specific succession of presentation by the professor on a specific topic followed by a discussion with the group to bring their own experiences and perceptions as to ensure a personal synthesis and positioning on the presented topic.
The presentation by the professor will be focused on actual market realities and on a practical approach to the different strategies and tactics to bring a product or services to the North American market. Some examples and case study will also bring some “cross-cultural” reference to other way of marketing and commercializing product in other world markets.
Some open discussions will also be done on a few actual problems referring to lager issues involving commercialization. These problems will contain elements of business ethics, conflict resolution, international trade, cross cultural openness, leadership style, and marketing know how.
The topics that will be presented and discussed are as follow:
·A description of some of the major differences in commercializing products in the North American and European markets. The legal contexts o The market structures o The customer relation paradigms o The priorities in logistics o ·The loss of power of the manufacturers. An economy building more and more choices for consumers o The customer as the new decision maker o The ten “demandments” of the 21century consumers o ·The new middle man: representing clients not producers.
The strategies used in the consolidation of the wholesale distribution o industries. The attraction of mass merchandising as a multiple channel industry o ·The new middle man as a manufacturer, Branding generic products, o Pushing the price of manufacturer down, o Asking to have more and more from the manufacturers and producers o (rebates, services, marketing tools, diversities of lines of product) and less and less trouble for the middle man (just in time, on line information, presence in the stores, electronic transfers of orders and payments, less suppliers in numbers, etc…) Always moving to the best deal with no fixed assets o ·From the a location business to a process business: the new retail Making money on both sides, the new profit centers… o The electronic revolution: more changes inside the store than outside o of it! From “eating data” to expressing “intelligence” in due time o ·A few success stories on best practices in the North American retail industries: Branding o Building customer traffic o Merchandising o Use of customer information o Use of internet and web technologies. o ·The tool for domination: the information system Productivity gain o More adaptability o The year to the quarter to the week to actual time… a shrinking time o span for decision makers ·A few actual problems to be discussed : What are the possibilities of market access for small and medium o manufacturers in North America? Are they now condemned to serve only relatively small niche? Can manufacturers regain their edge and power in the o commercialization game? If so how can they do it? What effect can optimisation have on the durability of jobs, business, o and local communities? Can small regional retail companies survive in the near future? What could be their strategies to hold their position?
Will the public local authorities have the power to dictates bylaws o applicable to large retail chains, or will this be perceived as barriers to free trade? Are the forces driving for “mass buying” to have economy of scales o have as a secondary effect the destruction of the small and medium business? Do you think that the different government (in Europe and in North America) in doing so in their public market are sacrificing tools for the development of their own entrepreneurship forces?
The participants to the seminars will receive a code name and a password that will them access to a specific section of the personnel web site of the professor containing: texts, bibliographic notes, forms and methods of analysis, and working tools related to the topics of the seminar.
Essential texts will be given and synthesize during the seminar.
Some of the work on which the presentation of the professor will be based, a part from extensive work experiences and numerous interviews are:
Adam J. Fein, “Winning strategies for a consolidating wholesale distribution industry”,Distribution research and education foundation, NAW, Washington, 2000
R. M. Gordon and Barron A. Weitz,“A key to best practices in the U.S. retail industry”, Center for retailing education and research, University of Florida. Kelly Mooney with Laura Bergheim, ‘The ten demandments”, McGraw-Hill, 2002 Paco Underhill,Call of the mall2004”, Simon & Shustrer Paperback, Al Ries and Laura Ries, “The 22 immutable law of branding”, (including the 11 immutable laws of internet branding), Collins business, Harper Collins publishers, 2002.