The Little Green Data Book 2010
248 Pages
English

The Little Green Data Book 2010

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This pocket-sized reference on key environmental data for over 200 countries includes key indicators on agriculture, forestry, biodiversity, energy, emission and pollution, and water and sanitation. The volume helps establish a sound base of information to help set priorities and measure progress toward environmental sustainability goals.

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Published 25 June 2010
Reads 74
EAN13 9780821382455
Language English

From World Development Indicators
The Little
Green Data Book
Agriculture
Forests and biodiversity
Energy
Emissions and pollution
Water and sanitation
Environment and health
National accounting aggregatesTHE LITTLE GREEN2010 DATA BOOKCopyright ©2010 by the International Bank for
Reconstruction and Development/THE WORLD BANK
1818 H Street, N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20433
U.S.A.
All rights reserved
Manufactured in the United States of America
First printing June 2010
ISBN: 978-0-8213-8245-5
eISBN: 978-0-8213-8446-6
DOI: 10.1596/978-0-8213-8245-5
SKU: 18245
The Little Green Data Book 2010 is a product of the
Development Data Group of the Development Economics Vice Presidency
and the Environment Department of the World Bank.
Editing, design, and layout by Communications Development Incorporated,
Washington, DC. Cover design by Peter Grundy Art & Design, London, U.K.Contents
Acknowledgments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iv
Foreword. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .v
Data notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . viii
Regional tables. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
East Asia and Pacific . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Europe and Central Asia. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Latin America and the Caribbean . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Middle East and North Africa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
South Asia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Sub-Saharan Africa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Income group tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Low income. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Middle income. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Lower middle income . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Upper middle income13
Low and middle income . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Euro area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
High income . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Country tables (in alphabetical order) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Glossary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 229
References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 235
The Little Green Data Book 2010 iiiAcknowledgments
The Little Green Data Book 2010 is based on World Development Indicators
2010 and its accompanying CD-ROM. Defining, gathering, and disseminating
international statistics is a collective effort of many people and organizations.
The indicators presented in World Development Indicators are the fruit of
decades of work at many levels, from the field workers who administer
censuses and household surveys to the committees and working parties
of the national and international statistical agencies that develop the
nomenclature, classifications, and standards fundamental to the international
statistical system. Nongovernmental organizations have also made important
c o n t r i b u t i o n s . W e a r e i n d e b t e d t o t h e World Development Indicators partners,
as detailed in World Development Indicators 2010. The financial assistance
of the Government of Sweden is also gratefully acknowledged.
The Little Green Data Book 2010 is the result of close collaboration between
the staff of the Development Data Group of the Development Economics Vice
Presidency and the Environment Department of the Sustainable Development
Vice Presidency. Mehdi Akhlaghi, Jeff Brez, Lopamudra Chakraborti, Richard Fix,
Kirk Hamilton, Andreas Kopp, Alison Kwong, Glenn-Marie Lange, Roger Morier,
and Giovanni Ruta contributed to its preparation. Meta de Coquereaumont,
Christopher Trott, and Elaine Wilson of Communications Development
provided design, editing, and layout. Staff from External Affairs oversaw
publication and distribution of the book.
iv 2010 The Little Green Data BookForeword
Welcome to The Little Green Data Book 2010. Ten years ago we published the
first edition of what has come to be a key reference for many practitioners
in the environment and development field. In that 2000 edition, Kristalina
Georgieva and Shaida Badiee—then Directors of the Environment and the
Development Data Group, respectively—wrote that to achieve lasting results
in environmental management, “we need to start from a sound base of infor-
mation that helps us set priorities and measure progress.” Then, as today, we
believe that The Little Green Data Book is a step in this direction. Over the
past 10 years it has grown in presentation and outreach as its informative
value has maintained the high standards we set out to achieve.
Under the headings of agriculture, forests and biodiversity, energy, emissions
and pollution, water and sanitation, environment and health, and national
accounts aggregates, we compile 50 indicators for over 200 countries
each year. The presentation of this information allows an easy comparison
of country-level data with benchmark regional and income group values.
Combining different indicators, it is also possible to obtain more metrics
relevant to different users.
Over the past 10 years we have taken the pulse of the world’s environment,
and we have seen progress in some areas but regression in others. The
data also show wide disparities across regions. For example, urban air pol-
lution declined in most countries between 2000 and 2006 (the most recent
year for which data is available), with the greatest progress in low-income
and lower middle-income countries. But concentration levels are still nearly
three times higher in these countries than in high-income countries. We have
tracked how the world has become drier as water resources per capita have
diminished under the pressure of fast-growing population. Water availability
is below scarcity levels in the Middle East and North Africa and South Asia.
Forest cover has fallen in Latin America and the Caribbean, South Asia,
Urban air pollution, by income group, 2000 and 2006
Urban population-weighted particulate matter (PM10)
concentration, micrograms per cubic meter 2000 2006
100
75
50
25
0
Low Lower Upper High
income middle income middle income income
Source: World Development Indicators data files.
The Little Green Data Book 2010 vForeword
Internal freshwater resources per capita, by region, 2002 and 2008
Thousands of cubic meters 2002 2008
30
25
20
15
10
5
0
East Asia Europe Latin Middle East South Sub-Saharan
& Pacifc & Central America & & North Asia Africa
Asia Caribbean Africa
Source: World Development Indicators data files.
Annual average change in forest area, by region, 2000–07
Thousands of square kilometers
10
0
–10
–20
–30
–40
–50
East Asia Europe Latin Middle East South Sub-Saharan
& Pacifc & Central America & & North Asia Africa
Asia Caribbean Africa
Source: World Development Indicators data files.
Energy from biomass products and waste, by income group,
2002 and 2007
Share of total energy use (percent) 2002 2007
50
40
30
20
10
0
Low Lower Upper High
income middle income middle income income
Source: World Development Indicators data files.
vi 2010 The Little Green Data Bookand Sub-Saharan Africa. In developing countries the net loss of forest area
for 2000–07 is estimated at 80,000 square kilometers a year. Finally, the
lack of access to energy continues to be an important health risk factor in
the poorest countries, where nearly 50 percent of energy use comes from
biomass fuels and waste.
The Little Green Data Book also estimates adjusted net savings, which mea-
sures the annual changes in a country’s total wealth. The literature shows
that a positive adjusted net savings rate is a necessary condition—although
not a sufficient one—for sustained growth. Unfortunately, many economies
appear to be failing this practical test.
The Little Green Data Book 2010 is a knowledge resource that aids policy-
makers in using environmental data more effectively to support priority-setting
and improved development outcomes. It is a collaboration between the
Development Data Group of the Development Economics Vice Presidency
and the Environment Department of the Sustainable Development Vice
Presidency of the World Bank. As we have every year for 10 years, we wel-
come your suggestions on how to improve future editions and make them
even more useful.
Shaida Badiee James Warren Evans
Director Director
Development Data Group Environment Department
The Little Green Data Book 2010 viiData notes
The data in this book are for the most recent year available. Regional
aggregates include data for low- and middle-income economies only.
Aggregates for regions and income groups are shown only if data are available
for 66 percent of the economies in that group.
Symbols used:
0 or 0.0 indicates zero or small enough that the number rounds to zero
at the displayed number of decimal places.
.. indicates that data are not available.
$ indicates current U.S. dollars.
Data are shown for economies with populations greater than 30,000 or for
smaller economies if they are members of the World Bank. The word country
(used interchangeably with economy) does not imply political independence
or official recognition by the World Bank but refers to any economy for which
the authorities report separate social or economic statistics.
The selection of indicators in these pages includes some that are being
used to monitor progress toward the Millennium Development Goals. For
more information about the eight goals—halving poverty and increasing
well-being by 2015—please see the other books in the World Development
Indicators 2010 family of products.
viii 2010 The Little Green Data Book