The Promise of Early Childhood Development in Latin America and the Caribbean
222 Pages
English

The Promise of Early Childhood Development in Latin America and the Caribbean

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Early childhood development outcomes play an important role throughout a person's life, affecting one's income-earning capacity and productivity, longevity, health, and cognitive ability. The deleterious effects of poor early childhood development outcomes can be long-lasting, affecting school attainment, employment, wages, criminality, and social integration of adults.
The authors first take stock of early childhood development indicators in the region and explore access to early childhood development services for children of different backgrounds. They review recent evidence on the impact of early childhood development interventions in the region and investigate more deeply a selection of programs in Latin America and the Caribbean to distill lessons related to their design, implementation and institutionalization processes. The book concludes with a discussion of the challenges of scaling up and presents policy options to develop national early childhood development policies and programs that may be effective and sustained over time.

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Published 03 December 2009
Reads 80
EAN13 9780821381649
Language English
Document size 2 MB

The Promise of
Early Childhood
Development
in Latin America
and the Caribbean
Emiliana Vegas and Lucrecia SantibáñezThe Promise of Early Childhood
Development in Latin America
and the Caribbean The Promise of
Early Childhood
Development in
Latin America and
the Caribbean
Emiliana Vegas and Lucrecia Santibáñez
with
Bénédicte Leroy de la Brière
Alejandro Caballero
Julien Alexis Hautier
and
Domenec Ruiz Devesa©2010 The International Bank for Reconstruction and Development / The World Bank
1818 H Street NW
Washington DC 20433
Telephone: 202-473-1000
Internet: www.worldbank.org
E-mail: feedback@worldbank.org
All rights reserved
1 2 3 4 12 11 10 09
This volume is a product of the staff of the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development
/ The World Bank. The findings, interpretations, and conclusions expressed in this volume do not
necessarily reflect the views of the Executive Directors of The World Bank or the governments they
represent.
The World Bank does not guarantee the accuracy of the data included in this work. The boundaries,
colors, denominations, and other information shown on any map in this work do not imply any
judgement on the part of The World Bank concerning the legal status of any territory or the endorse-
ment or acceptance of such boundaries.
Rights and Permissions
The material in this publication is copyrighted. Copying and/or transmitting portions or all of
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normally grant permission to reproduce portions of the work promptly.
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All other queries on rights and licenses, including subsidiary rights, should be addressed to the Office
of the Publisher, The World Bank, 1818 H Street NW, Washington, DC 20433, USA; fax: 202-522-
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ISBN: 978-0-8213-7759-8 eISBN: 978-0-8213-8164-9
DOI: 10.1596/978-0-8213-7759-8
Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data
Vegas, Emiliana.
The promise of early childhood development in Latin America and the Caribbean / Emiliana Vegas
and Lucrecia Santibáñez.
p. cm.—(Latin American development forum series)
Includes bibliographical references and index.
ISBN 978-0-8213-7759-8—ISBN 978-0-8213-8164-9 (electronic)
1. Children—Latin America—Social conditions. 2. Children—Caribbean Area—Social conditions.
3. Child development—Latin America. 4. Child development—Caribbean Area. 5. Child welfare—
Latin America. 6. Child welfare—Caribbean Area. I. Santibáñez, Lucrecia. II. World Bank. III.
Title.
HQ792.L3V44 2011
305.23109729—dc22
2009040426
Cover design: ULTRAdesigns.
Printed in the United States.Latin American
Development Forum Series
This series was created in 2003 to promote debate, disseminate informa-
tion and analysis, and convey the excitement and complexity of the most
topical issues in economic and social development in Latin America and
the Caribbean. It is sponsored by the Inter-American Development Bank,
the United Nations Economic Commission for Latin America and the
Caribbean, and the World Bank. The manuscripts chosen for publication
represent the highest quality in each institution’s research and activity out-
put and have been selected for their relevance to the academic community,
policy makers, researchers, and interested readers.
Advisory Committee Members
Alicia Bárcena Ibarra, Executive Secretary, Economic Commission for
Latin America and the Caribbean, United Nations
Inés Bustillo, Director, Washington Office, Economic Commission for
Latin America and the Caribbean, United Nations
José Luis Guasch, Senior Adviser, Latin America and the Caribbean Region,
World Bank; and Professor of Economics, University of California, San
Diego
Santiago Levy, Vice President for Sectors and Knowledge, Inter-American
Development Bank
Eduardo Lora, Principal Adviser, Research Department, Inter-American
Development Bank
Luis Servén, Research Manager, Development Economics Vice Presidency,
World Bank
Augusto de la Torre, Chief Economist, Latin America and the Caribbean
Region, World Bank
vTitles in the Latin
American Development
Forum Series
Discrimination in Latin America: An Economic Perspective (2010) by
Hugo Ñopo, Alberto Chong, and Andrea Moro, editors
The Promise of Early Childhood Development in Latin America and the
Caribbean (2010) by Emiliana Vegas and Lucrecia Santibáñez
Job Creation in Latin America and the Caribbean: Trends and Policy
Challenges (2009) by Carmen Pagés, Gaëlle Pierre, and Stefano Scarpetta
China’s and India’s Challenge to Latin America: Opportunity or Threat?
(2009) by Daniel Lederman, Marcelo Olarreaga, and Guillermo E. Perry,
editors
Does the Investment Climate Matter? Microeconomic Foundations of
Growth in Latin America (2009) by Pablo Fajnzylber, Jose Luis Guasch,
and J. Humberto López, editors
Measuring Inequality of Opportunities in Latin America and the Carib-
bean (2009) by Ricardo de Paes Barros, Francisco H. G. Ferreira, José R.
Molinas Vega, and Jaime Saavedra Chanduvi
The Impact of Private Sector Participation in Infrastructure: Lights,
Shadows, and the Road Ahead (2008) by Luis Andres, Jose Luis Guasch,
Thomas Haven, and Vivien Foster
Remittances and Development: Lessons from Latin America (2008) by
Pablo Fajnzylber and J. Humberto López, editors
Fiscal Policy, Stabilization, and Growth: Prudence or Abstinence? (2007)
by Guillermo Perry, Luis Servén, and Rodrigo Suescún, editors
viiviii other titles in the series
stRaising Student Learning in Latin America: Challenges for the 21 Cen-
tury (2007) by Emiliana Vegas and Jenny Petrow
Investor Protection and Corporate Governance: Firm-level Evidence
Across Latin America (2007) by Alberto Chong and Florencio López-de-
Silanes, editors
The State of State Reform in Latin America (2006) by Eduardo Lora,
editor
Emerging Capital Markets and Globalization: The Latin American Expe-
rience (2006) by Augusto de la Torre and Sergio L. Schmukler
Beyond Survival: Protecting Households from Health Shocks in Latin
America (2006) by Cristian C. Baeza and Truman G. Packard
Natural Resources: Neither Curse nor Destiny (2006) by Daniel Leder-
man and William F. Maloney, editors
Beyond Reforms: Structural Dynamics and Macroeconomic Vulnerability
(2005) by José Antonio Ocampo, editor
Privatization in Latin America: Myths and Reality (2005) by Alberto
Chong and Florencio López-de-Silanes, editors
Keeping the Promise of Social Security in Latin America (2004) by Inder-
mit S. Gill, Truman G. Packard, and Juan Yermo
Lessons from NAFTA: For Latin America and the Caribbean (2004) by
Daniel Lederman, William F. Maloney, and Luis Servén
The Limits of Stabilization: Infrastructure, Public Deficits, and Growth in
Latin America (2003) by William Easterly and Luis Servén, editors
Globalization and Development: A Latin American and Caribbean Per-
spective (2003) by José Antonio Ocampo and Juan Martin, editors
Is Geography Destiny? Lessons from Latin America (2003) by John Luke
Gallup, Alejandro Gaviria, and Eduardo Lora About the Authors
Emiliana Vegas is a Senior Education Economist at the Human Develop-
ment Department of the World Bank. During 2003–08, she worked in the
Bank’s Latin America and Caribbean Region. In this capacity, she advised
the Chilean and Uruguayan authorities on early childhood development
policies and interventions to raise the quality of basic and secondary edu-
cation. She is the author of several articles in peer-reviewed journals and
institutional reports, many of them focusing on education quality, teacher
labor markets, and teacher incentives. Her previous books include Raising
Student Learning in Latin America: The Challenge for the 21st Century
(2007, The World Bank Press, co-authored with Jenny Petrow) and Incen-
tives to Improve Teaching: Lessons from Latin America (2005, The World
Bank Press, Editor). She holds a Doctor of Education degree from Harvard
University, an M.A. in Public Policy from Duke University, and a B.A. in
Journalism from Andrés Bello Catholic University in Caracas, Venezuela.
Lucrecia Santibañez is a partner at Fundación IDEA in Mexico City, a
non-profit, independent think tank focusing on education and public pol-
icy analysis. Until 2009, she was professor of public policy at the Centro
de Investigación y Docencia Económicas (CIDE), where she began work
on this book. Before that, she was a researcher at the RAND Corporation.
She has published extensively on teacher incentives, teacher labor markets,
educational evaluation, and school quality. She is a frequent consultant for
The World Bank. She holds a Ph.D. in Education, an M.A. in Economics,
and an M.A. in Latin American Studies, all from Stanford University.
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